all posts post new thread

Barbell 1-Leg Deadlift

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I am not, but just a question. Is it one leg and two hands like in a conventional deadlift, or one leg one hand like a suitcase deadlift?
One leg, two hands.

I'm currently using 105 lbs (48 kg) and can manage two doubles in a session. (On each side, so it's 4 doubles altogether.) Noticeable burn in those under-used glute muscles.

The key is to keep the movement slow and controlled, really push the leg into the ground, and go all the way to lockout, pause there, and return to the ground slowly and under control again. For my doubles, I lower until the plates touch the ground, pause there for 1 second without completely releasing the tension on the bar, and go up again for the next rep.

-S-
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
It is an exercise I like and train regularly but not frequently. It is very common in my coaching. I think it's a great part of a warm up.

I can't say about loading. It is one exercise where I'm not that keen on aggressive progression. I'm not sure if it can be progressed in that aggressively.

It is obviously an exercise that teaches balance and in which balance and the balancing muscles are the limiting factor. And the relative usefulness also comes back to this.
 

Starlord

Level 5 Valued Member
Anyone else training the 1-Leg Barbell DL?

I am doing it as assistance for my conventional DL and find it particularly rude to perform (which is why I'm intent on becoming more friendly with it).

-S-
I've done 1 legged Romanian deadlifts with a kettlebell in the opposite arm.

You will definitely feel engagement in your obliques in ways you wouldn't with normal deadlift variations. It is also a brilliant tool for building angel stiffness for runners and field athletes too.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
I have only done them with a kettlebell but since receiving a barbell set might try the two hand version at some point. I also had a period of doing double kettlebell kickstand deadlifts and enjoyed those a lot. The toes of the non-working leg give you just enough "support" (balance?) that it felt somewhere between a standard deadlift and a one-legged deadlift.
 

Neuro-Bob

Level 9 Valued Member
How do you set it up?

Do you do a normal deadlift, shift to one leg, and essentially “start from the top”? Or do you approach the bar on one leg and start from the “bottom”?
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
How do you set it up?

Do you do a normal deadlift, shift to one leg, and essentially “start from the top”? Or do you approach the bar on one leg and start from the “bottom”?
1 foot under the center of the bar, bend down, grab the bar, stand up.

What you said would certainly be possible, but you'd be missing the most fun part of the lift ...

-S-
 

Cearball

Level 6 Valued Member
Have you thought of trying kickstand deadlift?

I am always paranoid about loading up single leg deadlift.

I'm thinking this
But allow rear leg to come up on toes.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Have you thought of trying kickstand deadlift?

No. For me, it's about finding all those little muscles.

I am always paranoid about loading up single leg deadlift.

If a rep starts to go south, I just put the other foot down, and if that happens near the beginning, I abort the rep and start over.

Here is an opposite stance, front foot on toes, completely by accident, and just because the bar got stuck on my clothing.




I post this to say that not having one heel on the ground didn't feel like it changed the lift all that much for me and I'd rather tough it out with only one foot on the ground.

The key to me is not looking at the 1-leg barbell DL as an act of balance but an act of strength - because this is an assistance exercise for my regular deadlift and because, hey, strong first. I am trying to create stability by pushing my foot really hard into the ground and not by any other means.

And besides, when you deadlift this way, you no longer have to choose between conventional and sumo, right? :)

-S-
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Love them to a certain degree, I don't like the barbell though. KB/DB for me unless there is a specialty bar (Like a trap bar, but open in the back).
I personally didn't like how it felt on the knees once I got to within ~20lbs body weight. I'm (farily) confident in my form but just gave me a weird feeling. I don't have many students get to this point, but the few I've had report similar once the weight starts to get north of 135. For some maybe it's fine.
I use it mostly as a light day, or as a back off from a heavier loaded hinge.
Tons of value as a warmup, either unloaded or contralateral loaded.
 

barrak

Level 6 Valued Member
@Steve Freides ... Why don't you push the... ummm... the bar a little bit and try uneven weights for some contralateral challenge?

I think I'll experiment with this movement using my trap bar... after I get a little stronger with the kettlebell contralateral 1LDL.
 

godjira1

Level 5 Valued Member
i find them pretty difficult and that i have to really get the tension going to lift even fairly light weight (eg 70kg). probably pretty good work for the posterior chain without loading the nervous system as much - am just speculating here.
 

Pete L

Level 5 Valued Member
No. For me, it's about finding all those little muscles.



If a rep starts to go south, I just put the other foot down, and if that happens near the beginning, I abort the rep and start over.

Here is an opposite stance, front foot on toes, completely by accident, and just because the bar got stuck on my clothing.




I post this to say that not having one heel on the ground didn't feel like it changed the lift all that much for me and I'd rather tough it out with only one foot on the ground.

The key to me is not looking at the 1-leg barbell DL as an act of balance but an act of strength - because this is an assistance exercise for my regular deadlift and because, hey, strong first. I am trying to create stability by pushing my foot really hard into the ground and not by any other means.

And besides, when you deadlift this way, you no longer have to choose between conventional and sumo, right? :)

-S-
Blazer and tie!! Love it
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 6 Valued Member
the balancing muscles are the limiting factor.
Stabilizer Muscle Training

A One Leg Deadlift primarily works the Stabilizer Muscles, as it does with One Leg Step Up; which has been addressed in previous post.

If increasing Stabilize Muscle is the objective, Stabilizer Movement are very effective.

However, Stabilizer Movement are not effective in Overloading the...

Primary Muscles

The Primary Muscle are more effective Overloaded when the Stabilizer Muscle are taken out of the equation.

Machines like the Leg Press, Smith Machine, etc. are more effective with increasing mass and strength in the Primary Muscles; since they take the Stabilizer Muscle out of the equation.

Barbell Exercise such as the Squat, Pressing, Deadlifts fall somewhere in between.

Thus, it come down to the Training Objective.

One Leg Deadlift Stabilization Training

One method that allows allows increasing the workload in Primary Muscle in a One Leg Deadlift is to perform them holding on to a Kettlebell or Dumbbell with one hand. With the other hand, hold on to something like a Power Rack, Chair, etc.

This method shifts more of the workload to the Primary Muscle in a One Leg Deadlift. This method is the same as with Step Up, noted in previous posts.

Training The Stabilizer and Primary Muscles

One approach would be to include both One Leg In-Stability Deadlift Training as well as One Leg Stability Deadlift Training into a Training Program. There are various way that could be used.

If a rep starts to go south, I just put the other foot down,

One Leg Barbell Deadlift Assisted Overload

Actually, this is a very effective method of performing an Assisted Overload.

It essentially the same as let's say performing a Bench Press with a Spotter. When you being to fail with the Concentric Part of the Bench Press, the Spotter provide some Assistance when you hit the the Sticking Point.

The Assisted Bench Press Training with a Spotter allow a lifter increase the Overloading in the movement.

The same is true by putting your other foot down to assist in the One Leg Deadlift that performing the work.

The beauty of it is it's simplicity.

Once the Stabilizer Muscle are fatigued (have been Overload) performing the One Leg Deadlift, placing the other foot down continuing the exercise, take the take the fatigued Stabilize Muscles out of the equation. The load is shifted to the Primary Muscle in the Movement.

Increasing The Stability Training

Attaching Band to an Ascending Strength Curve Movement (Squat, Press, Deadlift, One Leg Deadlift, One Leg Step Up, etc.) allows muscles to be Overloaded through a greater range of the movement.

One of the additional benefits of Attaching Bands is that it provide some additional Overloading on the Stabilizer Muscles.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom