2019: Goals?

WhatWouldHulkDo

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I'm all about goals - I love the process, but I love to be challenged too. As a result, I have a habit of doing a laundry list of goals. Case(s) in point:

  • Another 2x BW DL vote for me.
  • Add 1 more pullup to my max reps at each TSC.
  • Longer term, running a Spartan Beast is on my list, but I don't see that happening in 2019. Instead, I'm looking to run a Super without cramping.
  • Get my 10k time under 57 minutes consistently (i.e. without feeling like I have to kill myself to do it). Yeah, I know that's barely a crawl for some folks... what can I say, I'm a plodder.
  • By the end of the year, would love to feel ready to switch into the elite division for the TSC (i.e. for 2020). Not in it to win it - but able to get in and not embarrass myself.
  • A pistol squat. Just one, that's all I'm asking for!
... and become bulletproof.
 

dcc449

Triple-Digit Post Count
*2.5x bodyweight deadlift
*Snatch the 32 for a nice volume of reps on regular basis (maybe 500 reps/week as a sustainable baseline)
*Run a respectable distance race...20ish mins for 5k or equivalent for longer distance
*Be able to do these pretty much simultaneously, meaning none are ‘peak’ efforts
 

JCavin

Double-Digit Post Count
Also going to have my first go at bow hunting. Would really like to attempt to feed the family from game that I’ve hunted personally.

Trying to take steps to being more mindful in everyday life. Knowing the sacrifice an animal makes to sustain you and your family is important. To me.
 

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
To be 1 year younger by next Dec ROFL,
seriously though, stay healthy, snatch alot and have my calf ready and be running consistently..
 

Martin Joe

Triple-Digit Post Count

A worthy goal. .. but not always under your control, you know?

I'm sure you mean self-inflicted. Just pointing out that setting goals that rely on the outside world to do (or not do) something is a recipe for disappointment that I see in a lot of folks.
Hi @WhatWouldHulkDo
Thanks for your comment

I like your point!
You are right about avoiding self-inflicted injuries.

In 2018 I was hit by "jumpers knee" due to overtraining (self-inflicted)
AND I fell of a train and was injured pretty bad - Real World Problems

I am fed up with being injured and it really means something to me not to be injured :)

/M
 

mikhael

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
My goals:
  • eat paleo
  • reduce weight to 69kg (currently 78)
  • become stonger (be able to perform OAPU, Pistol Squat, mayby OA Pull-up)
  • run a marathon
  • read 10 books (all in English since I'm learning English)
  • improve my English
  • learn new language (still struggling with which should I choose Japanese or Russian)
 

conor78

More than 500 posts
Certified Instructor
Read at least 2 books per month
Compete in a BJJ tournament
Attend W Hoff Seminar
Compete Short course KB Strong 36kg

Maybe,,, Try GS comp in April
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
My goals:
  • eat paleo
  • reduce weight to 69kg (currently 78)
  • become stonger (be able to perform OAPU, Pistol Squat, mayby OA Pull-up)
  • run a marathon
  • read 10 books (all in English since I'm learning English)
  • improve my English
  • learn new language (still struggling with which should I choose Japanese or Russian)
There is an interesting article on T-Nation right now on eating Neolithic.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
Do you have any goals for 2019? I'm interested to know what you all aspire to achieve next year as reading about your stories on these forums is a source of inspiration, amazement and awe. I am consistently astonished by what is possible.

I'll kick things off in unorthodox fashion by not answering my own question :confused:

A few years ago I heard an interview with Sir Dave Brailsford (the mastermind behind the British cycling team 'medal factory' and the professional cycling team, Team Sky). Sir Dave spoke about a key factor in his success with those teams being attributable to focusing on the process not the goal. I've been mulling this over for a while now and I think the basic idea is that the goal guides you to where you'd like to go, but it is the process that will get you there. Ever since then I've been transitioning my way of thinking towards improving my processes, habits and skills. Consequently my objectives for next year are to improve my strength skills, my bike handling skills and to be consistent in my practice of beneficial skills and habits.

For what it's worth I do have some goals, which are to achieve the simple standard and to complete at least one wild camping expedition. I might just push myself to do a camp in January because what I'd really like is to complete one a month for the next year.
There is actually such a thing as "process goals" and these are superior according to research. You are not really able to predict what will happen and you are not in control of many external factors, so like stoic philosophy, you will be better off if you focus only on what you can control.

Not lose ten pounds, but stick to a particular diet consistently for four months except one cheat day a week, for example. The weight loss will take care of itself. You may even surpass your goals. Deadlift 400 pounds -> Follow the PTTP program four times a week on weekdays for six months. Achieve Simple S&S -> Do S&S five days a week consistently for the next three months and good things will happen. etc. In short, we are rarely able to predict or control outcomes, so we should instead control the process.

Other proven factors to improve goalsetting are to predict where you will fail or find difficulty, the sticking points. IF I feel like doing X or X happens THEN I will do Y. Example, If I get too busy or stressed at work, I will train for at least 15 minutes and do 40 instead of 100 swings.

Having only one challenging goal for a year or maybe every three or four months seems to improve results. You can cycle through your goals over the course of a few years. Having one maintenance goal (keep your current PR) and one challenge goal is also a good idea. We tend to discount the difficulty and importance of maintaining strength in favor of the shiny new workout. For example, every winter for two months, I get my 2x deadlift back.

When starting a new skill or habit start slow and ramp it up only when it takes as a habit. Not 100 pushups a day but start with X and add 1 each day, for example. I do one set per day before lunch. Most people binge and bail like all the new health club members in January.

Hope everyone meets their process goals this year. Happy Holidays!
 
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