500 lb Deadlift for Men - Sinister?

Is a 500 lb barbell deadlift a good equivalent of the 48 kg "Sinister?"

  • Yes,5 big wheels, 495/500 lb or 225 kg, is a Sinister barbell DL.

    Votes: 37 69.8%
  • No, 5 wheels is too heavy.

    Votes: 3 5.7%
  • No, 5 wheels is too light.

    Votes: 13 24.5%

  • Total voters
    53
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)

Thomas Scott

Level 1 Valued Member
I agree with Zach. Although accomplishing both would be ideal, I would rather be the guy who can complete Sinister with a kettlebell (100 swings, 10 getups) than Sinister with a barbell (single deadlift). It just seems to be a healthier endeavor.
 

Zach Ganska

Level 3 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
@Steve Freides- haha, nice.

On a serious note, given what's been written about your approach you have included the splits and other marks to be vigorous (healthy and strong). Have you since changed your approach and do not feeel that training was valuable.

Since we're discussing creating something from scratch then why not make the goal more useful for those who will chase it?

600, 500 pounds etc. is debating only one perspective. Quite frankly we're debating someone's innate potential at that point, not their resilience and other trainable attributes that can be developed if we frame this in a more useful way.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@Thomas Scott, @Zach Ganska, you're taking this more seriously than I intended. Not debating anything, just kicking around a number or two.

Speaking as a person who can indeed do a side split, I don't want that to be part of the discussion here. I'm also not asking if a barbell Sinister is somehow better or worse than a kettlebell Sinister. Health, well-roundness, etc., isn't at issue here. It would be a separate, and interesting, discussion as to whether the person who can do the Sinister getups is stronger than the person who can deadlift 500 lbs.

But let's save comparing apples and oranges for another thread. :)

-S-
 

Zach Ganska

Level 3 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
@Steve Freides I must have misiniterpreted the original question framed this debate, ""Is a 500 lb deadlift the equivalent of a 48kg "Sinister?" as an evaluative question.

"No."
 

Steve W.

Level 7 Valued Member
@Steve Freides,
How about putting the link to Craig's spreadsheet in a more conspicuous place so more people are likely to see it.

BTW, I edited my bodyweight lower since that is what I weighed when I hit or first hit the maxes I listed.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@Zach Ganska, we are looking for something in the same ballpark, not an exact equivalent since an exact equivalent cannot ever be found, anyway. IOW, Sinister is something a person of average abilities can achieve with a laser focus on the task at hand and the patience of Job, and a person of above average abilities can achieve more easily but will still have to work at. I am looking for that sort of thing, a deadlift that a person of average abilities can achieve after a few years of hard, smart training and that might come more quickly, but still not completely easily, to a person of above average gifts.

Does that make more sense than my previous explanation?

-S-
 

ali

Level 7 Valued Member
if there is a parallel to S&S, the standards of S&S must be considered 'on almost any day'. So simple isn't just crossing the line, it is owning it. Perhaps not always easy but feeling good it should always be doable.
So with a barbell and rep max, if a simple analogy is 300, is that a rep max? I've been playing with deadlifts, hence my question about this in another thread, would 5 reps at a weight be a better option than a rep max. I don't know the barbell terminology but wasn't there a blog by Fabio about 5 technical rep max, TRM. 5 reps for strength v simple power endurance. Only thinking out loud. No idea, 500 at 5 reps, 300 for that matter seems totally extreme to me!!
For simple 5 solid reps almost any day v 1 rep max, similar to crossing the line and owning it? Dunno?
 

Kettlebelephant

Level 7 Valued Member
IMO owning would be in the ballpark of the old strongman. They performed feats of strength (e.g. heavy bent presses) multiple times per day, 6-7 days per week and made it look easy.

Being able to walk up to a 10 plate barbell and pick it up whenever you want to is Sinister in my book.
 

JeffC

Level 7 Valued Member
@Kettlebelephant The Oldtime Strongmen did not just walk up to a feat and lift it, they warmed up with "calisthenics", as it was called then. They stretched, and did bodyweight exercises to prepare for heavy lifting feats. They made it look easy because it was their job, and they regularly performed nowhere near their max effort, and rested during the entertainment aspects of their performance.

@Harald Motz To own a weight, first you must be able to lift more weight.
 

Rif

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
@Zach Ganska, the goal isn't to be useful here. :) Just kicking around an idea that might make it fun for people who deadlift.

-S-
Yes. to me 500 lbs is when stuff becomes very serious in the dl. 400 lbs is not that uncommon at all in the powerlifting world for men or women. But 500 is when everyone starts paying attention.
The equivalent would be 400 lb bench press. 315 is not that uncommon but 400 is serious.
JMO
 

Deleted member 5559

Guest
Was giving this a little more thought today during a run. Perhaps the grip needs to be overhand and able to perform both sumo and conventional. Then 500# starts to take a new meaning for me.
 

Glen

Level 7 Valued Member
see this is where I kind of disagree @Rif as in my mind someone who can bench 300 should be able to deadlift 500 - I've always liked the ratios (amounts can differ but ratio should be similar IMO) of the 300 bench, 400 squat, 500lb dead - for the average limb length athlete at least.

unfortunately 300lb bench is a lot more common than 500lb pulls as people are obsessed with benching
 

Rif

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
@Glen, perhaps but I still don't think 300 is the bench equivalent of 500 in the dl. as you said, 300 is very common whereas 500 pulls are not and these days plenty are deadlifting. anywhere close to either is very decent strength regardless :)
 
Status
Closed Thread. (Continue Discussion of This Topic by Starting a New Thread.)
Top Bottom