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Other/Mixed Aerobic Deficiency Syndrome

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

LoneRider

Level 6 Valued Member
I found this article in my newsfeed today from the fine folks at Mountain Tactical Institute as run by Rob Shaul (founder of Mountain Athlete and Military Athlete).

 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
I found this article in my newsfeed today from the fine folks at Mountain Tactical Institute as run by Rob Shaul (founder of Mountain Athlete and Military Athlete).

Good article.
 

WhatWouldHulkDo

Level 7 Valued Member
If there is a vague idea of an aerobic base pertaining to endurance sports that rely on a big aerobic base, then what about anaerobic sport?....Really vague, I suppose?
You know, if any of this stuff had a 100% clearly defined science that applied across all cases, we'd all be doing it, and there wouldn't be any debate (except among folks who don't want to believe science). And of course, strength training (or to put it in your lane, speed training) is no different. There are methodologies that have been very successful, but to any methodology it seems like you can always find an anecdotal counterpoint.

I am just as skeptical of any attempt to draw a line that says "now you have enough aerobic capacity" as I am of any attempt to draw a line that says "now you are strong enough". Such assertions are marketing pitches, not absolute truths. The measurement has to be made in the application, not in the lab; if your most strenuous activity is picking up groceries, then your aerobic capacity test should be done in the grocery store.

If I was interested in scaling mountains or running marathons, then absolutely I'd be looking for aerobic capacity recommended by guys who scale mountains or run marathons. And therein might be the real magic; we all need to find aerobic capacity recommendations from people who are doing exactly what we wish we could do. For example, the Hulk recommends enough aerobic capacity to smash at least 4 alien soldier battalions without going anaerobic.

Apologies for the non-scientific rant.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Great article @LoneRider ! My two favorite quotes:
These are certainly getting better and better every year, but I would argue that a person is better served learning to read their own body. Personally, I’ve found myself during many training sessions frustratedly chasing heart rates, stopping me from simply finding a zone and enjoying the experience. But if I simply settle into a comfortable, nose-breathing (or conversational) pace, I can maintain pace longer and enjoy the training much more.
Rob and I probably could’ve passed a Bill through the molasses-covered halls of Congress with all of the time we spent kicking ideas, experience and research back and forth while I slogged through this writing.

The latter because it is funny, the former because it echoes my own experiences and why I am such a proponent of ventillatory threshold as a training marker.

Anyways, in slightly unrelated news, I saw an article that Aleksandr Sorokin broke the 100 mile record running with an average pace of 6:31 min per mile. That's just mind boggling. He definitely has ADS. ;)
 
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