Aerobic?

Al Ciampa

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Certified Instructor
Agree with both these points.

I definitely sweat a bit more on the rower as there is no cooling breeze (Concept C2 fans are useless for cooling).

Would you subscribe to the idea of varying MAF rate according to exercise? Or are all these forms of locomotion similar enough to stick with the 180-Age formula?
Karl, I subscribe to using MAF in general only as a very rough guide. Most important is the feedback I see working with an individual over time.

In general, I'd say yes--you should drop target HR in an activity that causes, relatively, unusual spiking of your HR.
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
I certainly don't agree with his view that rowing and cycling would be more similar to each other. Cycling is a much more localised effort (legs) than running (legs, core, bit of arms) and I think even that is more localised than rowing
To a point. But there is a big difference in (and a wide variety of) types of cycling. Aggressive Mountain Biking and Cyclocross are two examples that come to mind. Not to mention hilly road rides.
 

banzaiengr

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I find MAF pace rowing easier than MAF pace running and I get less HR drift which I interpret as slower depletion of glycogen stores.
Very little experience on the rower. But I do find less drift on the airdyne than when running.

Over the almost two years now that I've been restricted to the airdyne I've found that going lower than MAF seems to be the place for me. I recall a post by @Harald Motz where he looked for a pace he could do all day. That's what I've done at only a 3 HR reduction than my adjusted MAF. At first it cost me almost a half mile in distance on a 30 min. ride but over time I'm starting to see that distance slowly come up.

In general, I'd say yes--you should drop target HR in an activity that causes, relatively, unusual spiking of your HR.
Don't interpret what I'm saying as at least what I'd call spikes. It's just a drift that slowly goes one way or the other if I'm not paying attention. But lets not forget that for most of the HR monitors there is some error so sometimes I've wondered if that's not the case.

Am I on the wrong forum? What's all this aerobic talk.
 
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krg

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To a point. But there is a big difference in (and a wide variety of) types of cycling. Aggressive Mountain Biking and Cyclocross are two examples that come to mind. Not to mention hilly road rides.
I think I would characterise my cycling as semi-aggressive commuting with a rucksack. I certainly never get out of the saddle.
 

Harald Motz

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Certified Instructor
I find MAF pace rowing easier than MAF pace running and I get less HR drift which I interpret as slower depletion of glycogen stores.
Now most of this might be a personal exercise preference - as a 115 kg silver-back, me and running are never going to have a happy ending. But I don't see any good reason to treat the MAF rate differently for running or rowing.
Because of your BW.
Heavyweight blueprint rowers are 190-200cm weighing 90-100kg, roughly. Not svelte.

Bodyweight is the factor, when you have to fight gravity. 25-10 years ago, I liked to ride my racing bike in my hilly countryside hills up, and down and up and down and up and down. In that time period I was 75-78 kg and I have only two front chain wheels (I think nowadays three is standard). When 80+ kg I just feel having not enough gear to climb up, so I have not been riding really for the last years.

The same is with running. The last months I was 85-86kg, currently I am 83-84kg. What I can say for sure is that only one or two kilos less makes running a ton easier. Simple as that.

I recall a post by @Harald Motz where he looked for a pace he could do all day.
all day, on almost any day. Something like this. When I go short say around 30-40min then I go towards my MAF, but otherwise...its to hard for me.
 
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