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Bodyweight AGT Running

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
If i would follow some kind of AGT/Strong endurance training while running.
How would that look like?
 

TimothyGander

Level 5 Valued Member
AGT is based on short, high-power bursts of activity. You would probably need to do some intense sprints (maybe uphill) separated by generous rest periods of light walking of something like that. Pavel recalls some sprint routines and veloergometer based research in Q&D - you might research these for more detail. You may also try and "convert" kettlebell routines to running.
 

Georgiaoutdoors

Level 2 Valued Member
If i would follow some kind of AGT/Strong endurance training while running.
How would that look like?
I think you could apply most of what is talked about in the various A+A approaches in various forum posts and articles with hill or stair sprints. Also A+A swings, jump squats, or jumping split squats will probably have some carryover to running. In The Quick and the Dead, Pavel references some sprint workouts that you could try. I would be conservative with true sprint workouts. Make sure you are well trained and do a good warmup, as injury is pretty easy. Supplement the above with LISS walking, jogging, rucking, or cycling where you nose breath or hold a conversation.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
If i would follow some kind of AGT/Strong endurance training while running.
How would that look like?
Walk or jog easily, then sprint - I find about 20 steps is about right. Go all-out, like you're trying to get faster with every step. Then walk or jog again until you feel completely recovered, and then wait another minute. And repeat. You basically want to use a Q&D snatch protocol but sprint instead of snatch.

I haven't done this with jogging - I've walked instead. But assuming you're able to run very easily, that should be OK.

-S-
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
I don't know about the entire breadth of AGT research and practice.
But I do know what the StrongFirst Strong Endurance manual is. has to say.

Pass the talk test.
be able to keep your pace for an hour or more.
Trust the process, and utilize consistency over time as a driver of results.
Wave the load / Distance.
sprint some days with plenty of rest between attempts.
and when you go for a run for distance make sure you're not breaking your anaerobic threshold, and keep that target pace.

Do your best to emphasize these regions of the chart.
1664052485477.png


The more you can do to tap without overwhelming your ATPCP system, and your aerobic system, the more you'll encourage those pathways to increase their energetic substrates, and the more you can do that the more they will help augment the glycolytic fuel system should it be called upon on race day. but in training - for AGT reasons, do NOT dig into the Glycolytic region.

maybe that means lots of good Zone-2 Aerobics; say 30-90 minutes working up to a race pace coupled with short bursts with plentiful rest in between repeats, 3-5 minutes or till you feel fresh again. and do maybe 10-25 of those sprints on a sprint day. maybe you run these training days two days of zone 2 and 2 days of sprints per week and see how that goes?

A: Light sprints 50 yds 5-10 repeats @ 5 min.
B: Zone 2 pace @ 30 min
C: hard sprints 100 yds 5-10 repeats @ 5 min.
D: Zone 2 pace @ 60 min.

But really it has to be designed around where you are and where you wanna go. I'm just spitballing here.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
If i would follow some kind of AGT/Strong endurance training while running.
How would that look like?
Check "Easy Interval Method" by Klaas Lok from the Netherlands, available via amazon.

It is very much in line with StrongEndurance.

You train at the desired intensity (say, for a half-marathon at your half-marathon race pace), but for short repeats and then recover with easy jogs (and maybe even some walking) inbetween, postponing the accumulation of unwanted metabolic byproducts.

Not sprints, not steady state, but easy intervals... as the name states.
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Check "Easy Interval Method" by Klaas Lok from the Netherlands, available via amazon.

It is very much in line with StrongEndurance.

You train at the desired intensity (say, for a half-marathon at your half-marathon race pace), but for short repeats and then recover with easy jogs (and maybe even some walking) inbetween, postponing the accumulation of unwanted metabolic byproducts.

Not sprints, not steady state, but easy intervals... as the name states.
I have it allready.
But he recommend as i remember minimum of 6hours of running a week and Im not even close. So i havent looked much into it.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
I have it allready.
But he recommend as i remember minimum of 6hours of running a week and Im not even close. So i havent looked much into it.
Yes, for running as your primary goal. But when asked if people with less time should train more intense, he advises against it, IIRC.
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Yes, for running as your primary goal. But when asked if people with less time should train more intense, he advises against it, IIRC.
I have just looked a little in the book and its not at All like fx whats recommended as AGT for kb training. 15-30sec work EMOM FX.
 

randyh

Level 4 Valued Member
edit…sorry I just saw the bodyweight part of the title…but for AGT with weights for runners, Pavel recommended I try with my athletes ( mid distance to marathoners) super slow goblet Squat with super slow band assisted pull-ups. 2-reps, down 7.5 seconds, up 7.5 seconds. My cue is “2 reps to failure.” Rest to top of minute + a couple minutes more and move on to pull-ups. Bands for pull-ups are to insure a slow tempo, perform them same as squats. Rest, and repeat the cycle until talk test stops you…especially good for base mileage phase. (Shorter faster sets of swings I use in sharpening / peaking phases) You will just touch lactic if you do it right…slow twitch fiber automatically includes the mitochondrial machinery, monocarboxylate trasnsporters, etc. this protocol will help add more batteries to your tesla And strength.
bodyweight:
I assign super slow push ups and band assist pull-ups instead of goblet squats sometimes… you could also do fast, explosive pushups and split switch squats (or step ups or short hill sprints) for the shorter AGT method. Mt proximity probably makes for more efficient sport specific clearance of lactate, but you can make your upper body part of the lactate sink too.
 
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Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
I have just looked a little in the book and its not at All like fx whats recommended as AGT for kb training. 15-30sec work EMOM FX.
Okay, maybed the more relevant question is: What are you trying to accomplish? Why do you want to do AGT with runnning?

StrongEndurance is more than A+A. I haven't attended it, but I am confident, that the principles apply to Easy Interval, too.

To me, the main principle of SE is to train at the desired intensity and to stop the sets before the glycolytic system takes over, then rest enough for waste products to be cleared (more or less complete) and to start over. The specifics then depend on the type of intensity, exercise, and desired outcome.

For power exercises, this mean short sets, because they are fueled by the alactic system. Classic A+A. If you want to use running as a power exercise, go ahead and sprint. Q&D and S&S are similar, but make more use of using acidity for triggering certain adaptations.

However, SE also applies to different muscle fibers not only to the alactic energy system. The "Step up" protocol based on SE is an example. And then it is also dependent on the exercise and weights that are being used. KBSF Plan A is also pretty different from what you describe.

Other ideas are to improve endurance via slow twich hypertrophy (pre-quipped with mitochondria), as @randyh illustrates.

To come back to Easy Interval: Usually people train LISS + high intensity intervals, actually omitting race specific paces. However, Lok prefers to train at race specific paces, but to stop before lactate (or other by-products) start to build up. For the shorter distances, this is similar to A+A: 100-200m at 3k race pace, walk, jog, repeat. For longer distances it looks different, but the principles still apply: 1000m at 10k to half-marathon pace, 1000m walking and jogging for recovery, repeat.
 

mar2safety

Level 5 Valued Member
Strong Endurance in Schools to Strengthen the Next Generation | StrongFirst
This article has a great sprint/pushup session that is fantastic. I've used this template often, usually warming up with a 2km slow run to the soccer field near my house. There is adequate rest built in and the switching between sprints and pushups feels great. I walk during rest cycles.
jason-avelar-strong-endurance-table-1-big.jpg
 

ali

Level 6 Valued Member
https://www.b⁶⅝bc.co.uk/sounds/brand/m00127y4?partner=uk.co.bbc&origin=share-mobile

Thought to post this here, a little off piste: the dissection of a cheetah to unravel why they're so fast. Evolutionary adaptation processes and the trade off between speed and duration and the mechanisms that support that are discussed.
Perfect to listen to if you're squeamish.

People outside the UK may not be able to access it. Sorry about that but on the upside at least you don't have to live here.

One way to escape watching a country implode is to marvel at nature and the fact that cheetah's have big livers.

Off for a sprint...
 

Torin

Level 4 Valued Member
Pavel recommended... super slow goblet Squat... 2-reps, down 7.5 seconds, up 7.5 seconds... Rest to top of minute + a couple minutes more
Thanks for sharing this randy!
This variation of the slow twitch protocols is just what I was looking for.
 
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