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Kettlebell Alactic + Aerobic

Oscar

Level 7 Valued Member
Harald

Any thoughts on a controlled drop of the kB to rack before dropping the kB between the legs for snatches, rather than a drop from overhead position? Would get some benefits from the eccentric part of the press, and may make the drop portion less technically challenging (and taxing).

Thanks

Take a look at this old post by @Rif where he calls it his "new favorite lift".

My new favorite lift


I was thinking the other day that it seems like a good regression to learn how to snatch. The drop is a lot easier, its not so demanding on grip, it doesnt hurt the hands as much, its probably safer for a beginner, etc. What do people think?
 

DavThew

Level 6 Valued Member
@Oscar looks like a good choice for someone who wants to keep their press up whilst giving all their time to the snatch. I have noticed with double snatches that pulling the kbs down in to the rack lights up the abs and chest like very little else out there.

This would make a good addition to my old A+A medley. You line up a few different kbs and do ballistics with them for the appropriate rep range with a standardised rest in between.

My ususal choice was:
32kg one arm LCCJ 2 reps
Rest
28kg snatch 5 reps
Rest
Double 24kg LCCJ 2reps
Rest
28kg snatch
Rest
Return to the start.
 

Augustus F-N

Level 6 Valued Member
Running is too boring. There must be another way, and I will find it.

I disagree. Running for me is adventure, peace, play, moving meditation, and the times I push the pace and gulp down the runner's high, something approaching ecstasy.

After running 8 miles (roughly, I never measure or time) I'm sad it's over; I now have to wash my muddy legs and return to the world as a responsible adult. But I'm never bored. To each their own. Maybe I'm just simple minded.
 

Harald Motz

Level 8 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
rhymes with boring. Although I am on it almost every day, maybe only because I have such a great taste of music I put on my ears.

I disagree. Running for me is adventure, peace, play, moving meditation, and the times I push the pace and gulp down the runner's high, something approaching ecstasy.

After running 8 miles (roughly, I never measure or time) I'm sad it's over; I now have to wash my muddy legs and return to the world as a responsible adult. But I'm never bored. To each their own. Maybe I'm just simple minded.
I am with this on running.

Running is too boring. There must be another way, and I will find it.
rowing, rucking, walking, swimming, cross-country skiing, cycling, airdyne, elliptical... something that engages the whole body, with unrestricted breathing through the nose for some extended time for some times per week done over some considerable time frame.

doing some relaxed slow locomotion is the thing for recovery, from set to set, and session to session with the weights. And as @aciampa said somewhere, there is no way around it.

With weights and even light bells moved quickly as with the ballistics there is tension which puts restriction on breathing and blood flow which makes up for an inferior cardio tool, when it comes to build up aerobic capacity.
 

Kettlebelephant

Level 6 Valued Member
rhymes with boring. Although I am on it almost every day, maybe only because I have such a great taste of music I put on my ears.
I agree that it can be boring, especially if you look against a wall, but the great thing about a rower is that you can do it in your home and it's relatively cheap (compared to a treadmill).
So you can just place it in front of your tv and watch your favorite movie or series and it won't be boring anymore.
I know some people want to keep their training clean of things like the tv or music and just focus on the task at hand.
I agree when it comes to strength training, but for me listen to music, a podcast or audiobook makes my runs (and other forms of LSD work) very enjoyable.
 

Al Ciampa

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Running is too boring. There must be another way, and I will find it.

Perhaps figure out what is boring about it and change that.

I fall in with the others who use no music or distraction and find running for hours thrilling and satisfying. And mind you, I am not a typical runner... at 235lbs and sciatica usually causing some degree of pain and numbness, I shouldn't enjoy running.

In the end, if running bores you and you aren't tested in it, you don't have to run... but make no mistake; there is no other way to derive the benefits of running (cross-country skiing, maybe?).
 

Norcoaster

Level 2 Valued Member
Take a look at this old post by @Rif where he calls it his "new favorite lift".

My new favorite lift


I was thinking the other day that it seems like a good regression to learn how to snatch. The drop is a lot easier, its not so demanding on grip, it doesnt hurt the hands as much, its probably safer for a beginner, etc. What do people think?
Nice - seems I’m not the first to think of it, but great minds think alike ;)
 

WhatWouldHulkDo

Level 7 Valued Member
I'm certainly in the camp of needing to have my music to do a long run. I can't quite claim to love it, but I do appreciate the zen of just shutting off my mind and letting the body hit cruise control for a while. Can't really do that with a strength session.

I will throw out that getting into a few large races helped change my perspective on running when I started years ago. Running with a few thousand people around you is a much different experience than being out on your own - sort of like being a wolf running with your pack. I think mixing the experience of pack running and lone running helps to give it all purpose.

I also think people find running boring if they don't fully appreciate what they take away from it. For me, the biggest the payoff of a good run is the sense of accomplishment I come away with when I'm done - the knowledge that, if I'm ever called on to do so, I can move myself around 6 miles or whatever, and still be strong enough to be useful when I get there. I think it's easy for folks around here to take that sense of accomplishment away from a strength session, just gotta learn to use it elsewhere.
 

Ian V

Level 5 Valued Member
This would make a good addition to my old A+A medley. You line up a few different kbs and do ballistics with them for the appropriate rep range with a standardised rest in between.

My ususal choice was:
32kg one arm LCCJ 2 reps
Rest
28kg snatch 5 reps
Rest
Double 24kg LCCJ 2reps
Rest
28kg snatch
Rest
Return to the start.

@DavThew
I really like the look of that - how many rounds would you expect to do ?
 

DavThew

Level 6 Valued Member
@DavThew
I really like the look of that - how many rounds would you expect to do ?

I used to do 5-10 rounds (20-40 sets in total). One warning would be to do this before a rest day. I think LCCJ are less forgiving than snatches and demand a bit more recovery.
 

Ian V

Level 5 Valued Member
I used to do 5-10 rounds (20-40 sets in total). One warning would be to do this before a rest day. I think LCCJ are less forgiving than snatches and demand a bit more recovery.
Many thanks - 10 rounds would be well over my limit - I am seriously considering using this maybe 3 times a week but with no more than 3 rounds and will be including some swings. Not sure if that will give me the full benefit but it suits what I want to do. Many thanks for the idea - I will certainly be using it in some form.

Best regards,

Ian
 

Harald Motz

Level 8 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I'm certainly in the camp of needing to have my music to do a long run.
rowing, never without, running never with music. That's me.

Coming from an hour run half an hour ago. I often think: this overall feeling after a relaxed run in pill form I may swallow it, but I would not get the many adaptations from it. It builds the foot, Achilles and calf complex, it builds a spring literally, it builds posture. Breathing is totally unrestricted and free as for rowing there is more tension from pulling and isometric contraction of the upper body. At the same heart rate rowing feels harder to me, it is in a kind more engaging than running. With running I can let my legs go for a run, rowing I always have to be pulling. For rowing my right dose is 10km most of the time it takes me 45min. With running when I want to run for 45 min I only have to run for 22,5min. 22,5min in one direction, turning around and then 22,5min back home. Rowing and Running are totally different not only movement and physical wise, but psychological as well.

There's running around your block(s) on sidewalks or paved streets in your neighborhood. And there's running on trails through forests, mountains, and open country...
over the last year or so I ran almost the same route exclusively along the street near a local creek. In former times when I ran, I ran trail frequently hills up and down through the woods. When it is one thing that the Westwood/Westerwald has to offer, than it is trails. I think I will begin running through the woods again, but recently the wolf was seen after many decades in the Westerwald again...
 
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