Anyone read Barbell Prescription: Strength Training for Life After 40

Antti

More than 2500 posts
I find that recovery is very, very individual and there are a myriad of factors that go into it. And some of them are psychological and/or simply a matter of adaptation, while the others are not. So I find hard-programmed deload periods odd.

Of course, one might ask whether it makes sense to hard-program the training if there is a significant individual variation in it as well. A good question. I think this is one of the matters which comes into more focus as the trainee becomes more advanced, and the more advanced one becomes, the more individual the training and recovery becomes.
 

jef

I am a student of strength.
Certified Instructor
I was surprised to see in the SS NLP program that you just keep going up in weight, with no deload periods.
To be fair, there is some "wave the load" in Starting strength also, but they do not insist much on it, focused as they are to present it as the "most efficient way to get strong". Pure NLP is only a few weeks, then some waves are introduced.
Once we cannot do 3 sets of 5 with more weights, we try again once or twice, and if we fail again, we are supposed to introduce a light squat day. Also, there is a chapter on deload of both volume and intensity (either small one, if we get stuck by little, or big one if we fail by a lot), but I do not remember if it is in Starting strength or Practical programming.
As much as I remember, it is also written this way in The barbell prescription, and the programs given in example are waving the load too.
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
My understanding of the theory is that a novice doesn't need a deload, but a program designed for an intermediate or advanced would need one because the period of stress within the stress/recovery/adaptation cycle is longer; a week or several weeks to build fatigue before taking a deload and allowing the fatigue to dissipate.
Periodization Training

The foundation of a well written and executed training program is reliant on Periodization Training; progressive overload training session followed for a number of weeks. Once the lifter has peaked, the lifter drops the training load/percentages or changes exercise.

Periodization Training Cycles program contain periods of progressively overload followed by recovery periods in which lifter, dramatically decrease the load/percentage and or volume. The over a period of weeks progressively increase the load/percentage or volume for personal records, get stronger.

The General Adaptation Syndrome

The foundation of Periodization Training is built on this principle that virtually applies to everything in life. It is part of the ebb and flow sleep and work.

The number of week in a Periodization Training Program Guidelines are based on...

Training Age

This mean how long a lifter has been training.

Novice Lifer adapt slowly. This allows them to continue to make progress for longer periods of time before they adapt; around 8 - 12 week training cycles before a new cycle 8 - 12 week training cycle need to be implemented.

Advance Lifter adapt faster. This means they need to change their training program about every 3 - 4 weeks.

Active Recovery

Periodization Training's progressive overload is followed by a new easier training cycles. The new easier training cycle fall into the category of Active Recovery. Light load are employed which allow for recovery; strength increases during recovery.

Deloads for a one or two training session are not as effective as Periodization Training Cycles over a number of weeks.

Novice, Intermediate, Advance


Periodization Training with planned period of pushing the limit and planned recovery periods work for everyone.

Kenny Croxdale
 

krg

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Yes... this area interests me as well. Deloads are covered nicely in SFL. I've had deloads in every program I've done, except S&S; bike base training, 5/3/1, SFG Prep, A+A... My body often feels refreshed and recovered, as well as stronger, after a deload. I was surprised to see in the SS NLP program that you just keep going up in weight, with no deload periods. I guess I'll find out if that works for me as I carry it out. My understanding of the theory is that a novice doesn't need a deload, but a program designed for an intermediate or advanced would need one because the period of stress within the stress/recovery/adaptation cycle is longer; a week or several weeks to build fatigue before taking a deload and allowing the fatigue to dissipate. For a novice, the S/R/A cycle is just 48-72 hours, so there is no accumulating fatigue over the course of several sessions.
I guess when you plateau you switch to Texas Method or some other protocol where you wave the load more.

Stronglifts 5x5 recommends a 10% deload if you've failed to make your reps a couple of times in a row.

My view would be that some deloading becomes necessary whenever recovery is sub-optimal (age, sleep, nutrition, stress).
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
a 10% deload
So, are there two definitions of deload? I have heard it used like this, as is, "reduce the load slightly." But mostly I take it to mean a deliberately planned period of time (usually a week) where BOTH the volume and intensity are reduced significantly, perhaps as much as half, from the weeks leading up to it.

@kennycro@@aol.com , good information, and yes training age is definitely an important consideration.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
So, are there two definitions of deload?
I don't think there's a definition per se. Just take it easy. I think - and this seems like common sense to me - how much you have to unload depends on how hard you pushed up to that point. E.g., because I compete, I generally take a week off and do whatever I feel like. It's not so much that I don't do any exercise, or do some calculated percentage of rolling back load and/or volume, as that I do whatever strikes me as enjoyable and/or restorative. The "deload" is mental, too - no program to follow.

But, OTOH, if I finish a program without a competition or max test, I may just go right into something different, and the fact that it's different is enough of a change that I don't need any down or particularly easy time.

-S-
 

MikeTheBear

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Agree with @Antti My training involves lots of autoregulation. If I push myself hard for a number of workouts I'll just naturally back off on subsequent workouts. I also agree with @Steve Freides (See Steve, we can actually agree on some things!) If I need a break from heavy lifting I'll do a workout where I'll just do a few sets of a barbell or kettlebell complex.
 

Abdul-Rasheed

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Pure NLP is only a few weeks
Makes sense to me. If I were to do this program, I am pretty sure I would hit the plateau soon.

Sorry if it is off topic, whats your suggestion on deload for Faleev's 80/20 program, if at all applicable? If the trainee fails to meet 5x5 for certain weight I think it suggests to stay at that weight until 5x5 is reached (if there is a competition in which case it suggests 4x4, 3x3...). I don't compete. What if I to do so 2-4 weeks in a row? What do you think of applying deload perhaps 10% (as mentioned above for StrongLifts)? Or what other options?
 

KIWI5

More than 300 posts
Anna C- I'm midway through Dry Fighting Weight, as I've increased the days off to 2 after each session, I don't feel like a deload is necessary yet, but once I'm finished- a week of flex/mob will certainly be in order. I made the mistake of taking no deload periods last year (while barbell training) and developed a few injuries as a result (I am an intermediate barbell lifter). I tried to contact Andy Baker regarding deload periods, however he did not reply. That's where the book Ageless Athlete excels; deload periods are a large part of the successful long term strategy (especially the older lifter).
 

KIWI5

More than 300 posts
While I won't provide the link- Andy Baker has recently posted on 'deloads'- and how he programs these for his clients. His methodology closely follows what Kenny Croxdale outlined above- why he omitted this in 'Barbell Prescription' is beyond me....?
 

Stefan Olsson

More than 500 posts
Anna C- I'm midway through Dry Fighting Weight, as I've increased the days off to 2 after each session, I don't feel like a deload is necessary yet, but once I'm finished- a week of flex/mob will certainly be in order. I made the mistake of taking no deload periods last year (while barbell training) and developed a few injuries as a result (I am an intermediate barbell lifter). I tried to contact Andy Baker regarding deload periods, however he did not reply. That's where the book Ageless Athlete excels; deload periods are a large part of the successful long term strategy (especially the older lifter).
Ageless Athlete is great, not only for older lifters but also younger who needs to changes their training due to injuries etc.

While I won't provide the link- Andy Baker has recently posted on 'deloads'- and how he programs these for his clients. His methodology closely follows what Kenny Croxdale outlined above- why he omitted this in 'Barbell Prescription' is beyond me....?
Why not post the link?
 

KIWI5

More than 300 posts
I wasn't sure if posting the link would violate the forum rules- seeing as Andy Baker sells his own products. One could look at Andy Bakers website and they would see the latest blog post- just don't tell Steve Freides I sent you there!
 

Stefan Olsson

More than 500 posts
I wasn't sure if posting the link would violate the forum rules- seeing as Andy Baker sells his own products. One could look at Andy Bakers website and they would see the latest blog post- just don't tell Steve Freides I sent you there!
Andy is great!

I would advice Ageless Athlete by Jim Madden for older lifters who wants to get stronger AND well conditioned! Im not allowed to post a link for convenience, but I highly advice people to google it!
 

KIWI5

More than 300 posts
Yes - Ageless Athlete is EXCELLENT. After reading Barbell Prescription, I purchased both Tactical Barbells & Ageless Athelete. I haven't seen anything as comprehensive and well put together as these books.
 
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