Are Australian pull ups useful for those who can do 10+ pull ups?

Waltdisney199

First Timer
I'm trying to increase my reps to 15-20 pull ups. Is it better to conserve my energy and just do standard wide and neutral grip pull ups, or will Australian pull ups be beneficial?
 

H. Mac

Double-Digit Post Count
Welcome to the forum!

I was unaware until yesterday that the term, “Australian Pull Up,” is now being used for the exercise better known as the Inverted Row.

In my view, three components are key to improving Pull Up performance: Grip strength (governs the length of time one can stay on the bar); Pulling strength (determines how well, how high and the number of Pull Ups that one can perform); and Core strength (essential for proper form).

The FPP, regular and negative Pull Ups and Chin Ups with various grips, Bar Holds, and Deadlifts helped me increase my Pull Up capability. Another exercise, the Scapular Raise (basically a Pull Up with locked elbows, with the shoulders being slowly raised and lowered through their full range of motion) also seemed to help.

But I think Inverted Rows could be beneficial too, although perhaps after performing the other exercises I mentioned. It might be wise to try them using various grips and angles, and perhaps with the feet placed on a bench.

Pull Ups are great, and good luck with your plan to improve your performance!
 

Marc

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
By australian pullups you mean inverted rows, right?

In that case, I'd say they are useful. It is a horizontal pull (pull ups being vertical). Your goals will determine your rep range but speaking of the movement per say, stil recommended.
 

George Locke

Double-Digit Post Count
Horizontal pulls strengthen the upper back very well. If you really want to focus on pull ups, then vertical pulls are going to be most important, but, among other things, hitting the muscles from more angles will probably promote hypertrophy, which will help. I'm guessing vanilla bodyweight rows are probably pretty easy for you, so you may like variations like (tucked) front lever rows or archer rows may be useful for bringing you into a rep range below 30.
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

I would use OA Australian pull up (or even OA OL Australian pull up) as an antagonist exercise of the OA push up or OAOL push up.

Otherwise, I'd Simply use weighted pull ups or typewriter pull ups.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
I'm trying to increase my reps to 15-20 pull ups. Is it better to conserve my energy and just do standard wide and neutral grip pull ups, or will Australian pull ups be beneficial?
Do you feel that there is a particularly weakpoint that is holding you back? If it were grip then I would simply hang from the bar actively and passively. Generally, choose your supplementary exercises to work on a weakness or to provide balance, for example adding rows if you have too much pressing.

Have you heard of the tactical strength challenge? Look at the standards for the event and then if you learn (improve) snatch and deadlift you would have something to aim for that would motivate your training.

When you ask questions, try to provide more information about your current ability, background, and goals. We don't know if you can do two now or ten. Our advice would depend on many factors.

Also, have a look at the concept of Grease the Groove if you are not familiar with it. Perfect for pullups.
 

Bauer

More than 500 posts
It depends.

Andy Bolton considers rowing to be the most important assistance exercise for DLs and presses.

If you want to be really strong and pull huge numbers on the deadlift, you have to have a strong back. In fact, for all three of the powerlifts (squat, bench, and deadlift), a stronger back will lead to stronger lifts. There are many exercises that you can use to train your back. In this chapter you are going to discover some of the best, how to perform them properly and where to put them in your training program. The exercises that you will use to train your back can be divided into two main categories: Horizontal pulling movements (rows) Vertical pulling movements (pull-ups/ pull-downs)

Bolton, Andy; Pavel Tsatsouline. Deadlift Dynamite: How To Master The King of All Strength Exercises (Kindle-Positionen2573-2579). Publications, Inc. Kindle-Version.

Here are four important tips for training your back: Do more upper body pulling than you do pressing. This is great for shoulder health and balance in your physique. If you do 100 reps of pressing in a training week, do at least 100 reps of pulling (rows and pull-ups/ pull-downs). (...) Do your upper body pulling movements after your big compound strength movements like squats, deadlifts, presses, snatches, and cleans.

Bolton, Andy; Pavel Tsatsouline. Deadlift Dynamite: How To Master The King of All Strength Exercises (Kindle-Positionen2712-2720). Publications, Inc. Kindle-Version.
This last bit might be important for bodyweight training, too. A lot of folks I know focus on pushups, dips and pullups. To balance things out, Aussie Pullups might be a good fit in this case.

And another application might be back-off sets, where you do 20+ reps in a single set at the end of a workout for better recovery and gains. So you could just add on high-rep set of rows after your pullup session.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
It depends.

Andy Bolton considers rowing to be the most important assistance exercise for DLs and presses.

If you want to be really strong and pull huge numbers on the deadlift, you have to have a strong back. In fact, for all three of the powerlifts (squat, bench, and deadlift), a stronger back will lead to stronger lifts. There are many exercises that you can use to train your back. In this chapter you are going to discover some of the best, how to perform them properly and where to put them in your training program. The exercises that you will use to train your back can be divided into two main categories: Horizontal pulling movements (rows) Vertical pulling movements (pull-ups/ pull-downs)

Bolton, Andy; Pavel Tsatsouline. Deadlift Dynamite: How To Master The King of All Strength Exercises (Kindle-Positionen2573-2579). Publications, Inc. Kindle-Version.

Here are four important tips for training your back: Do more upper body pulling than you do pressing. This is great for shoulder health and balance in your physique. If you do 100 reps of pressing in a training week, do at least 100 reps of pulling (rows and pull-ups/ pull-downs). (...) Do your upper body pulling movements after your big compound strength movements like squats, deadlifts, presses, snatches, and cleans.

Bolton, Andy; Pavel Tsatsouline. Deadlift Dynamite: How To Master The King of All Strength Exercises (Kindle-Positionen2712-2720). Publications, Inc. Kindle-Version.
This last bit might be important for bodyweight training, too. A lot of folks I know focus on pushups, dips and pullups. To balance things out, Aussie Pullups might be a good fit in this case.

And another application might be back-off sets, where you do 20+ reps in a single set at the end of a workout for better recovery and gains. So you could just add on high-rep set of rows after your pullup session.
Good reminder. Thanks.
 
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