Back to Basics: Faleev vs ReLoad

Mr. Nobody

Double-Digit Post Count
Hi everyone!

What's the party line on the pro's and con's comparing these two programs for a newbie who "used to lift"?

I was thinking about doing this:
Day 1: Heavy Squat 5x5
Day 2: Heavy Bench 5x5, Chins/Lat Pulldown 5x5
Day 3: Heavy Deadlift 5x5
Day 4: light bench 4x5, chins/lat pulldown 4x5
Day 5: light squat 4x5

After reading ReLoad the closest setup to the above would look likes this:
Day 1: Heavy Deadlift 5x5, light bench 5x5, upper back
Day 2: Heavy Bench 5x5, light squat 5x5, abs
Day 4: Heavy Squat 5x5, light press 5x5, upper back
Day 5: Heavy Press 5x5, light deadlift 5x5, abs

So 40% more volume for lower body, +100% more volume for presses and a bit less volume for upper back.

Is ReLoad flat-out better? The extra work will probably yield more gains in the long run.
But the book mentions that this is not meant to be run long-term. Can someone explain that? Is there any information on how to run this set up for longer periods of time.
Faleev seems convinced that a bare bones program like his can work well long-term doing little extra work and building extra muscle mass using the same setup but with higher reps. Opinion on that? Would that work with ReLoad as well?

I guess the biggest downside using Faleev would be the lack of the overhead press? The biggest upside more recovery and shorter workouts?

I guess S&S twice a week could make up for the lack of overhead work and add some extra work for the posterior chain?


Here is some background information on me:

I am 30 y.o, 6'4'', 220lbs and out of shape. I "used to lift" and have worked up to the Simple standard and decent barbell lifts (~1xbw overhead press + 2xbw squat) in the past. But after 3 years of being a lazy couch potato with lots of bad habits my performance has gone down a lot. I am actually a bit lighter than I was and still look "in shape" when wearing clothes. But most my muscle mass has been replaced by fat (I was surprised when I saw the results on the scale because I look a lot fatter than I used to :D ) and I honestly struggled with the TGU using the 16kg KB when I started working out again over the holidays. :(

Anyways, my goal for 2020 is to go down to 200lbs bw and work up to 200/300/400 in the 3 powerlifts. In addition to barbell lifting I will do steady state cardio (running) for at least 3x30 minutes per week to help with weight loss. Nutritional guidelines will be a simple 1lbs of veggies and stake per day + carbs to meet my caloric needs.


I hope everyone had a good start into 2020 and thanks for helping!
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
I would recommend a simple linear progression as you build back up. Last year after surgery I had to build my strength and lifts back up, and it worked great. Simple and effective. Pick your lifts, do a reasonable 3x5 each session, and add weight to the bar each time, lifting 3x/week... or something like that according to a basic program. Then when you run out of gains on simple programming, then go for one of the above.

I would recommend 3x30 min walk instead of running, unless running is really easy for you and you can hold a conversation the whole way. Maybe work in a few short stints of jogging to your walks as time goes by.

Congratulations on getting back on the strength & fitness wagon! You'll do fine I'm sure.
 

Mr. Nobody

Double-Digit Post Count
I would recommend a simple linear progression as you build back up. Last year after surgery I had to build my strength and lifts back up, and it worked great. Simple and effective. Pick your lifts, do a reasonable 3x5 each session, and add weight to the bar each time, lifting 3x/week... or something like that according to a basic program. Then when you run out of gains on simple programming, then go for one of the above.

I would recommend 3x30 min walk instead of running, unless running is really easy for you and you can hold a conversation the whole way. Maybe work in a few short stints of jogging to your walks as time goes by.

Congratulations on getting back on the strength & fitness wagon! You'll do fine I'm sure.
Hi Anna, thanks for answering!

Something like...
Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Deadlift 3x5
Upper Back/Abs
... 3 times a week?

What's the upside of this? Just the faster progression?

And why no running?

Again, thanks for answering. Just curious :)
 
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Kettlebelephant

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
And why no running?
Because running and strength training don't go together well. It can be done, but if you don't need to run for work or competition I would recommend to do something else for conditioning like walking/rucking, biking, swimming or rowing.
I think it's mostly the high impact that makes running especially detrimental when you also want to do strength work.
@kennycro@@aol.com probably has more info on this.
 

Mr. Nobody

Double-Digit Post Count
Because running and strength training don't go together well. It can be done, but if you don't need to run for work or competition I would recommend to do something else for conditioning like walking/rucking, biking, swimming or rowing.
I think it's mostly the high impact that makes running especially detrimental when you also want to do strength work.
@kennycro@@aol.com probably has more info on this.
Ok, thanks for the info Kettlebelephant! Wow, didn't expect that. Any additional information on this?
 

Kettlebelephant

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Any additional information on this?
"So, there’s one major takeaway here – aerobic training does not hamper strength training in and of itself. The effect starts materializing when it begins causing additional stress to the muscles and soft tissues. Running, with its impact element, affected strength and size gains especially as volume increased, whereas cycling didn’t."
- From Cardio and Lifting - Cardio won't hugely impact your gains in the short run, and may be beneficial for strength and size in the long run • Stronger by Science

It's still an "it depends" thing. To a 150lbs small guy with perfect running form & economy, running won't be nearly as detrimental as to a 220+lbs big dude with bad running form.
 
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Mr. Nobody

Double-Digit Post Count
"So, there’s one major takeaway here – aerobic training does not hamper strength training in and of itself. The effect starts materializing when it begins causing additional stress to the muscles and soft tissues. Running, with its impact element, affected strength and size gains especially as volume increased, whereas cycling didn’t."
- From Cardio and Lifting - Cardio won't hugely impact your gains in the short run, and may be beneficial for strength and size in the long run • Stronger by Science

It's still an "it depends" thing. To a 150lbs small guy with perfect running form and economy, running won't be nearly as detrimental as to a 220+lbs big dude with bad running form.
Thanks, Kettlebelephant! That kinda makes sense. I have never been a good runner but never had any negative experience either except some mild pain in my shins when I was really heavy. I assumed that running would be one of the better supplements to barbells because it also conditions you lower legs. Guess even that has a negative impact.
 
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Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
And why no running?
Yep, what @Kettlebelephant said.

I think of it in terms of stress and adaptation. If I'm completely sedentary, walking is a new stress. If I walk but haven't run in years, then running is a new stress. When I start a new strength program, the strength session is a new stress. Your body has a limited amount of recovery resources (and remember, you don't get stronger during the strength training session, you get stronger as your recover from the strength training session). These recovery resources are further stretched thin if you're not on point with nutrition, sleep, and life stress management.

But for someone that is so adapted to running that they can really do some easy, easy runs... no problem. Might even help recovery.

I'm certainly not saying running is a thing to avoid; just that it's not a good thing to start doing along with starting a serious strength-building program.

Something like...
Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Deadlift 3x5
Upper Back/Abs
... 3 times a week?
Yes, something like that. The only one I have personal experience with is Starting Strength, and I can tell you it works well. Simple, hard, and effective. But there are other linear progression program options out there.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
Reload or similar programming can work well, IMHO, done half the year: 3 months of Reload, 3 months of something else, repeat. Aim for a new best at the end of each Reload 3-month period.

You can also hire StrongFirst to write a PlanStrong program for you, see our web site. Because you fill out a questionnaire, they will tell you if they think it's suited to you and, if they don't think it is, they'll refund your money. But they're very good, combining the art and the science of strength training programming.

-S-
 

q.Hung

More than 500 posts
Base on my experience, the only downside of Reload for beginner in my opinion is the 1RM and the 5RM test. The beginner may not know how to grind probably, and the weight could be to light/ to heavy at the begin of the cycle, and/ or the weight jump is not suitable.
 

Blake Nelson

Double-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
I would recommend a simple linear progression as you build back up. Last year after surgery I had to build my strength and lifts back up, and it worked great. Simple and effective. Pick your lifts, do a reasonable 3x5 each session, and add weight to the bar each time, lifting 3x/week... or something like that according to a basic program. Then when you run out of gains on simple programming, then go for one of the above.

I would recommend 3x30 min walk instead of running, unless running is really easy for you and you can hold a conversation the whole way. Maybe work in a few short stints of jogging to your walks as time goes by.

Congratulations on getting back on the strength & fitness wagon! You'll do fine I'm sure.
Anna is totally right here. If you are coming back to things you should enjoy the linear progress while you can. Keep things reasonable and let your body get used to training again.

Then follow Reload to the letter. It is straightforward and it works.
 
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