Kettlebell Battle ropes

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Provx

Level 4 Valued Member
How many of you are using battle ropes in combination with kettlebell or original strength training. The ropes make a lot of sense to me and could add some variety.

I am doing crawling, rucking, carries, and simple and sinister at the moment, would could the ropes add?
 

Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
I used to do a lot of Battle Ropes with my brother some years back. Bought my own ropes and always took them to the woods, wrapped them around a tree and trained. Nice memory, I really enjoyed it...

Anyhow, they make a good conditioning exercise but it really depends on your goals since they can be quite demanding.
If you specify your goals we might help you better.
 

Provx

Level 4 Valued Member
Im basically in fat loss mode while trying not to bulk up as to not hinder my golf game.

I usually worry about strong legs, core, hands , wrists and avoid overdoing bicep, chest and shoulder exercises.

Simple and sinsister seems to be helping my golf game, crawling really losens up my back and makes me feel better in general.

Rucking is just something i like to do from time to time to add variety.

My thinking with the ropes would be they would hit grip strength while helping fat loss
 

Marc

Level 6 Valued Member
Well, if you are already doing S&S you have 5-7 sessions/week which does not leave too much room for extra sessions.
You could do S&S 4x/week and do ropes 2x/week.
There are differenz modalities you could do them: really hard variations/fast moves @10-20 sec with longer rests bacically A&A style. Or more glycolitic based.
Honestly, if you do S&S 5-6x/week I see no additional benefit from ropes that S&S does not provide aside from variety.
 

wespom9

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I use battle ropes with clients mostly as part of a "metabolic finisher" in a circuit. It's a relatively low stress (assuming no neck/shoulder issues) thing to add in combo with some loaded carries, using the rower, etc. My clients seem to like these circuits at the end of sessions.

I actually really like it for a couple reasons with my youths - we do a tall kneeling rope slam where each kid has an end of the rope and holds it in front in a tall kneeling stance. One slams it sending a wave of energy toward the other, who has to "catch" the rope and not get knocked over. I learned about it at an FMS course for power - there is a theory (that seems to work practically) that being able to accept force allows greater production. It's actually harder to not get knocked over than you think if you don't cheat it and stay true tall kneeling, pelvis level. Not only that, the student sending the force gets a great overhead slam equivalent to a med ball, and my kids absolutely love it. When you tell them to try as hard as they can to knock over their partner, you organically get some great powerful movements.
 

Griff

Level 6 Valued Member
I've used battle ropes on and off for years. I think they can be used at the end of a session of S&S if you keep the volume low and the rest long. I think a better option would be performing short sets spaced throughout the day (GTG) - 5-6 sets spaced in an 8 hour time period.

Remember that golf is a rotational power sport with short intervals and long rest as you walk/drive to your ball. You can use the ropes to replicate that but don't get too carried away or it will effect your recovery from S&S.

On a side note I've recently written an article about a "new" variation to battle ropes, it may help you develop leg/core power. I haven't tested it for golf yet so it's just a hypothesis. If you do try it let me know how it goes.
Battle Rope Leg Waves: The Ultimate In Lower-Body Power And Pump

With regard to fat loss I'm sure you know this already but I wouldn't count on activity to make much of a difference. The only people I've seen that work for have put in time to get really strong and carry around more muscle mass than most. Watching what you eat will probably be more effective.

Cheers!
 

Provx

Level 4 Valued Member
I've used battle ropes on and off for years. I think they can be used at the end of a session of S&S if you keep the volume low and the rest long. I think a better option would be performing short sets spaced throughout the day (GTG) - 5-6 sets spaced in an 8 hour time period.

Remember that golf is a rotational power sport with short intervals and long rest as you walk/drive to your ball. You can use the ropes to replicate that but don't get too carried away or it will effect your recovery from S&S.

On a side note I've recently written an article about a "new" variation to battle ropes, it may help you develop leg/core power. I haven't tested it for golf yet so it's just a hypothesis. If you do try it let me know how it goes.
Battle Rope Leg Waves: The Ultimate In Lower-Body Power And Pump

With regard to fat loss I'm sure you know this already but I wouldn't count on activity to make much of a difference. The only people I've seen that work for have put in time to get really strong and carry around more muscle mass than most. Watching what you eat will probably be more effective.

Cheers!


Im going to be honest, that looks amazing.
 

Dasho

Level 6 Valued Member
You could play around with subbing in rope swings for kettlebell swings:


Not sure if there's a tangible benefit over kettlebells, but it could give you a 'taste' of battle ropes without stretching yourself too thin.
 
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