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Kettlebell Bent press/side press question

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sizzlefuzz

Level 6 Valued Member
I was speaking with someone recently about how I was looking to learn the bent press & side press, and they commented that I would be better off just doing windmills and military presses because the bent press and side press are a case of "half-a#@" movements. Is there any truth to that, or was I dealing with someone who is uninformed?
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

To a certain extent, military presses and windmills are "components" of the bent press.
> Windmills will bring some torso flexibility and strength. Plus some shoulder work (flexibility)
> Press will mostly bring the triceps work

However, BnP also uses a kind of squat, so it implies some hip flexibility and mobility, plus some leg strength. BnP obliges to have a strong coordination (when to press, how to be placed, how to breathe, etc...). This is a very old school lift, not that used anymore.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Shawn90

Level 5 Valued Member
the bent press and side press are a case of "half-a#@" movements. Is there any truth to that, or was I dealing with someone who is uninformed?

''uninformed'' is an understatement... On top of the excellent points @pet' made;

I don't know about the Side-Press, but the Bent Press, in my book, is the king of lifts. Not because strong guy's say so, but because I like to practice it regularly.

1. I think it's much better than a military press. Because you can lift a s***load of weight in a bent press, on one arm. Perhaps even more weight than you could do with a military press. (2 arms) The bent press might not work the muscles that hard, since you rather support it on your BONE structure, supporting alot of weight in the first place strengthens your bones. So (for me) that is one valid point why BtP is better than MP. More weight = stronger bones, stronger bones = stronger ligaments and tendons = stronger everything

2. BtP gives thoracic spine (upper back) flexibility. Lots of people lack this.
3. it requires skill... lots of skill practice. Complex movements are good for the brain...
4. BtP is full body.
However, BtP also uses a kind of squat, so it implies some hip flexibility and mobility, plus some leg strength.
BtP execution is quite personal, not everyone will be using ' a kind of squat' or a forward bent, lots of people bent side-way's, some keep their legs straight. I have tried both and must say I prefer the forward bent with squat at the end. Bending side-ways stresses the erectors more. Forward bending hits the LATS like a truck

5. Isn't the Bent Press part of the SFGII certification standard ??

6. Most people I spoke with never heard of the bent press. Hell i've trained for 8 years at a gym that didn't have real barbells or heavy dumbbells. Or even taught people to deadlift or squat. So if theres something you want to do, learn, experience. Just do it alright ? If you learn the Bent Press you will fall in love with the lift, most definitly. I know I did.

7. and final. It looks beautiful :D
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
It's a serious lift. Check out Alydia Bryant doing a bent press with 48kg.

I'm only up to 32kg so far. But I'm sure I'll go farther. In comparison, can only MP 24kg, and that only on a good day.

Isn't the Bent Press part of the SFGII certification standard ??

Yes, but not heavy -- for example, my required weight at the cert is 16kg (snatch-test sized bell). Funny thing is, when I bent press 16kg it never feels right, at least on the right side. 20kg and heavier and everything smooths right out.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I agree with @Shawn90 's post. I noticed that BnP is as functional as TGU, assuming I added a grind of the leg (such as loaded pistol).

From my experience, I trained long time with 36kg for BnP, and 28kg for loaded pistol. This lead me directly to a 40kg GU. However, I can MP only 28kg.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Dasho

Level 6 Valued Member
Sounds like you were dealing with someone who has never done the movements in question...

When I was first learning kettlebells and doing S&S style workouts, I had actually used a Clean and Press into Windmill combo as a substitute for TGUs, because at the time I was exercising in a dirty warehouse on my lunch break and didn't want to roll around on the floor.

Fast forward to now, after I purchased Taming the Bent Press and started learning the Bent Press, and I can tell you that it is another creature entirely. I had to do a lot of mobility work and progressions to even come close to doing a proper rep. It is a rewarding movement when everything starts to 'click', but definitely not a half-assed exercise, whereas almost anyone of average strength could probably manage their way through a press and windmill.
 

Snowman

Level 6 Valued Member
because the bent press and side press are a case of "half-a#@" movements.
I'm trying not to be too dismissive, but to me this just speaks to a lack of understanding. Like saying the push press is just a half-a#@ military press. It's a totally unique movement, with unique demands, and it produces unique adaptations. Don't do a push press and call it a military press. Don't do a push press if a military press would produce more appropriate adaptations. But don't say a push press (or side press, or bent press, or bosu ball overhead pistol squat) is "bad," just because you don't understand the context in which it's useful.

Look at the people who do a lot of bent pressing and/or side pressing. Evaluate their results, then decide if those results are something you would like for yourself. If your goal is to get better at BJJ, then I think you would see slightly better result from side presses, bent presses, and TGU's. They require (and develop) a high degree of mobility and coordination along with strength, and it seems like that would be more useful when grappling (disclaimer: I have done very little grappling).
 

taikei

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
At some point, professional strongman Eric Moss was suggesting to alternate sets between military press and bent press. This comes from a guy who places a steel bar on his nose and bends it.

My opinion on bent press is, this is an honest scapula movement lift which cannot be cheated.
 
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