Best variation of pull ups for BJJ?

John Crotty

Still New to StrongFirst Forum
Certified Instructor
What would be the best variation of pull ups (overhand grip, underhand grip, etc.) for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?
 

Pantrolyx

Triple-Digit Post Count
I guess it depends on your strengths and weaknesses, but you kan easily emulate the sportspesific gripping by doing pull-ups from a hanging belt or gi.
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

In addition to @Pantrolyx LSit rope climbing or even pull up hanging from belt / gi, with raised legs.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

FifthForge

First Timer
Gi or NoGI? I partially agree with Pet', Rope climbing is the best bang for your buck pulling exercise, although too much compounded with the gripping from training can cause medial epicondylitis (golfer's elbow). (Pancake/straddle can be substituted for L-Sits if you're unable to doe them.Anecdotal experience from my own training shows that training the extensors extensively can help negate this.

If rope's aren't an available, I find that Pull-ups with "Fat Gripz" are fantastic coupled with close grip chins.

Experience: BJJ & Luta Livre for 10 years.
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
If you believe that pull-ups will help your bjj, and based on the nature of the sport then I would suspect you would want to apply multiple variations. Overhand, underhand, uneven grip, and especially using a belt, gi, or towel as has already been suggested.

And also as noted.... you need to watch the elbows for signs of overuse injury when doing lots of pull-up training.

Disclaimer:
BJJ experience = 0
Pull-up & grip training experience = 45yrs
 

WeightedPullups

Double-Digit Post Count
What would be the best variation of pull ups (overhand grip, underhand grip, etc.) for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu?
Do them all. Start with the most challenging and work your way down to the easiest. So for example IMHO of what is the hardest down to easiest (each line represents a set)
Pull-ups
Chin-ups
Neutral Grip
 

Tuebor

Double-Digit Post Count
Jump pullups.

Pullup and when you are at the top release your hands from the bar, re catch the bar on the way down.

When you get proficient at hand release pullups switch to pullup/ chin-ups. Do a pullup and hop your grip to a chin-up on the way down, chin-up hop grip back to a pullup.

I believe these work the grip in a very specific way to be prepared for the shock of grabbing someone to establish your man dominance.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Anything that makes you stronger in any way will be helpful for BJJ. I'm not sure pullups or chinups really mimic the movement patterns of the sport well though. I've been at this stuff for 30 years. Chinups are something that help keep you fit and strong, but as for actually progressing your game, there's better stuff out there.

I don't think it matters what kind of chinups or pullups you do. In BJJ your grip could be supinated or prone, depending on the situation. The commando chinups are also good, where you have one hand prone, one hand supinated.
 

Tony Gracia

Double-Digit Post Count
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I would agree with the responses suggesting you use a variety of grip options, so long as they seem agreeable with your joints (some people get irritation in elbows and/or shoulders and/or wrists with certain grips). Pick a few options that don't seem to bug anything and use all of them from time to time.
 

ShawnM

More than 2500 posts
Towel pull ups are great, I prefer neutral grip pull ups as I don't over use my elbows and don't get the pain I do from standard pull ups.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Don't forget about dips though. If you're going to do chinups then why not dips? They'll fill in the other half of your upper body muscles.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Still, the hip hinge strength is important in BJJ. Chinups and dips don't develop it. If you're weak at the waist you can't bring the strength of your lower body to help your upper body.

BJJ is less power driven than judo i.e. it's more raw strength based. I'd recommend deadlifts over any kind of callisthenics. And, as a program, S&S has served me terrifically well for both judo (which is my real, main sport) and BJJ.
 

Pantrolyx

Triple-Digit Post Count
Still, the hip hinge strength is important in BJJ. Chinups and dips don't develop it. If you're weak at the waist you can't bring the strength of your lower body to help your upper body.

BJJ is less power driven than judo i.e. it's more raw strength based. I'd recommend deadlifts over any kind of callisthenics. And, as a program, S&S has served me terrifically well for both judo (which is my real, main sport) and BJJ.
Well, explosive stuff like muscle-ups, and the somewhat easier varieties, are excellent for working the snap in the hip for martial arts. I'm not very competent at it myself, but I did learn to master the "pop-up" from Movnat a few years ago, and it surely works the hips and abs a whole lot.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Well, explosive stuff like muscle-ups, and the somewhat easier varieties, are excellent for working the snap in the hip for martial arts. I'm not very competent at it myself, but I did learn to master the "pop-up" from Movnat a few years ago, and it surely works the hips and abs a whole lot.
I've never done one so I can't speak to it. I do think however that a lot of people put a lot of effort into the wrong exercises for their goals. I know guys who do lots of slow heavy lifting for judo and it just isn't making them any better at judo. Chinups or anything is always good to do to get stronger, but if we're talking BJJ, you're going to develop the strength basically to pull your upper body up and to curl your arms, which are part of the game, but if you aren't coordinating your strength through your hips to your legs, you're choosing to make your weak link your hips, and you'll get folded in half by stronger guys.

I'm maybe out to lunch as I often am, but in judo and BJJ you're holding onto a foreign object (your opponent) and so lifting free weights is much more aligned with these sports than callisthenics. But you're getting this from a guy who back in his competitive days in judo and a bit in BJJ used chinups, dips and walking as his staple off mat exercises, hahaha, and I didn't do too badly in the matches. :)

So, here's my opinion on this:

1. Do as many chinups and variations as you want.
2. Balance these out with dips or pushups.
3. DO NOT neglect some kind of hip hinge strength exercise such as kettlebell swings or barbell deadlift, cleans or high swings or similar.

Last but not least, please report back to us on your successes or failures with your new training regimen.
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

What follow will not be a pull up variation, even if there's a pull involved in it: clean and press. Here, starting with the bell on the ground. If one adds a squat after getting the bell in the rack position (once the press / push press is done), then I guess one has a acceptable complex.

Depending on the weight, EMOM, AA, and so on may be a good "bang for the buck" in terms of strength and conditioning. Nonetheless, if we consider additional grip training, the heavier the better in this case.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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