Body weight Options

Steve Rogers

Level 6 Valued Member
Hello Strong First Family,

I normally hangout in the Kettlebell threads and I have done some S&S until having issues with my shoulder and then selling all my Kettlebells.

Which brings me here. I’ve finished my rehabilitation of my shoulder and I have started doing Original Strength and then continued stretching of my shoulder.

Since I don’t have any kettlebells or barbells I wanted to see what my options might be for body weight.

Can you list some Strong First body weight options for training for strength?
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@Steve Rogers
First of all, I hope your shoulder is now fine.

As far as strength goes, if you look for some kind of bodyweight version of S&S, this protocol is interesting:

If you do not want to do OAP / OAOL PU, you can do HSPU. Both have advantages and drawbacks:
OAP / OAOL PU will drastically work on your core, so this is "time efficient". Nonetheless, OVH press (so HSPU here) transfer better to horizontal push than the other way around. The drawback is that HSPU engages less the core, so if you want to be more "well rounded", it can be interesting to add a core training.

It will be hard to replicate the hip hinge provided by the swings. But you can do shrimp squats which are some kind of "hip hinge" squat. So when you perform a pistol, immediately after you can perform the shrimp (with the same number of repetitions)

As far as the conditioning goes, LSD / rucking / swimming, etc... For AGT training, sprint repeats (with plenty of rest between sets)

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Steve Rogers

Level 6 Valued Member
Sorry @Karen Smith I just saw this. My shoulder was very inflamed after moving several hundred heavy boxes for my FedEx job. I have had x-rays and an MRI and nothing is visibly torn or fractured so I have been given the green light to workout. However, I have noticed that I get some pain when I do pull-ups.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

For the push ups, good ways to make them easier or to get a rehab is to do them hand elevated (on chair for instance) or doing them on the knees.

Hand and placement is important : I like putting them shoulder width, with fingers pointing slightly outwards (this engagez the lats).

I also like leaning a little forward

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member
It will be hard to replicate the hip hinge provided by the swings. But you can do shrimp squats which are some kind of "hip hinge" squat.
I recently started doing wrestler's (neck) bridges, inspired by the Gamma the Wrestler thread. They feel to me quite a bit like squat/DL combo in different plane and of course, with different ROM. I was working on gymnastic/yoga bridges and found that my shoulders hated them like the behind the neck presses they are. Wrestler's bridge is a whole different animal. One caution, they are surprisingly intense. Last time I did them was in high school in late 1960's (YIKES! So long ago). I still have the muscle memory and first day did 3 sets of 5 up the middle followed immediately by holding at the top while going as far as ROM allows, ear to ear (5 each side). Mild DOMS so next day did 5 sets with no issues. Then did 3 sets of 10 and got a lot more sore. 5X10 caused acute need for a couple days off. Felt a lot like too much vol/intensity of deadlifts.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I agree with you @GeoffreyLevens . Bridges can replicate to a certain extent, as you said, the hip hinge motion. I remember that Al Kadadlo, alongside with bdw single leg DL can help to build / replicate a regular deadlift.

Below is video of him performing it by the way. This is a move I really like because if done very explosively, it helps to maintain swings. I often pair it with hanging leg raises to get a flexion and an extension. Usually, I do 5 HLR and 6 bridges.

I remember neck bridges training when I practiced judo. They were extremely hard. I think they are not for everybody, at least not for me !

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member
2 cautions: The full bridge Al demonstrates contains, as I mentioned, a behind the neck press which can be problematic if you have shoulder and/or thoracic mobility issues. I do neck bridge a bit differently than he does. I use my neck as part of the power generator to get up into position. And there again, due attention must be paid to mobility. Be very certain you know where you are going, how far you can go, and don't exceed that if/when you do them explosively. A catastrophic neck injury can talk to you for the rest of your life. I do them at a much more contained pace rate, faster than a full grind but definitely NOT explosively. Goals are crucial as always.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

The pistol is a nice blend of strength, balance and mobility.

The full back bridge is also some kind of interesting blend: hip strength and power (I'll come back to that after), spine and shoulder flexibility.

I do not use my neck at all during this move. As far as shoulder goes, I stretch them everyday. Initially, the back bridge was part of my daily stretch routine, but with only 1 or 2 repetitions. Doing it as a portion of my current routine, meaning doing more repetitions, is something "new". However, I guess that stretching this move for years prior help me to handle it.

The power I put in the move through my hips permits me to initiate the motion. Then, the flexibility of the shoulders and the spine does the rest of the job. There is indeed a slight behind the neck press in all cases, but the more power I put through the hips, the less pressing strength I have to use. This is almost the same concept between a strict kb press and a jerk / push press.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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