Bodyweight.. Or weighted bodyweight ?

q.Hung

More than 500 posts
More ROM and more tension are the keys in calisthenics. Get you self the rings, those will take care of upper body exercise.
About ROM, for example, the headstand push up and the handstand push up are two different moves, with the later is more difficult because of greater range of motion.
With the lower body, honestly i have no idea how to progress in calisthenics
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

@Kozushi
I see you train a lot, and basically are quite active !

My training week involves three judo sessions of a total of 4 hours altogether, several daily sessions of sets of max slow reps of dips and chinups, S&S twice a week at least, hikes or walks of well over an hour several times a week and/or running with 3lbs dumbbells, some iron mace training when I feel like it, and some kendo moulinettes (suburi is the Japanese word). This could change next month if I get some new ideas or whatever, but it gives you the idea.
I usually do 3 boxing sessions a week, for a total of 4h30. Of course, this includes the technique and the sparring. Depending of the teacher we have, some sessions are more demanding than others. For instance, when we do 6 rounds, plus some interval of heavy bags, plus technique well...you end up quite done.

My "side training" is done everyday, first thing in the morning. It varies a lot. Currently, I do some "StrongFirst" roadwork, as follows:
300 rounds, 1 * 2 OAOL PU ES, 1 * 1 OA PU ES, 5 OA swings @40ES, during 20 minutes. During the day, I do multiple sets of regular push ups (up to 1000 a day, with full ROM and "regular pace"). For each set of push up, I do 1 pistol.

Otherwise, I walk a lot (up to 1h45 a day). We chose not having a car. Then I carry all the stuff (food, water...) everyday and never use the elevator. Eventually, I am always moving.

Given my size, dips and chinups are the heaviest things I can do for those movements. I'm pushing off or pulling down 100kg! That's quite a lot of weight to do reps for if we're talking for general athleticism.
Yes this is true. You can make things harder by slowing down the eccentric phase and making the concentric more explosive. With a dip: you get down in 5 seconds, then no stop at the bottom (but still in full ROM) and get up in only 1s. I got good results using this. This is called "functional hypertrophy". There is plenty of information on it on the Charles Poliquin's website if you are interested in it. It works well !

I don't understand boxing or kickboxing too well, but my impression has always been that if we're talking about building and using strength, the wrestling arts are better but if we're talking about real combat the striking arts are better. Wrestling arts are still good as a base to build striking arts on top of, of course, and they can work for self-defence etc in spite of lacking some aspects, against most people I figure. You might find you'll get a bigger kick out of judo than out of boxing if you give it a real try, given your interest in strength.
Clearly, judokas, wrestlers, etc... are stronger than boxers. In boxing, we can work on max strength, to then progress on explosive strength and power. But there is less focus on this.

In the real world, I think judokas, wrestlers, etc...have a more "useful" strength (endurance for "heavy duty"). In fighting, I do not know. I think this is better to be a good judoka than a bad boxer, or a good boxer than a bad judoka. MMA may be the more "complete" ?

This is why I will never train especially for boxing. I practice boxing, but I train more for GPP than anything else !

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
More ROM and more tension are the keys in calisthenics. Get you self the rings, those will take care of upper body exercise.
About ROM, for example, the headstand push up and the handstand push up are two different moves, with the later is more difficult because of greater range of motion.
With the lower body, honestly i have no idea how to progress in calisthenics
Regarding lower body I think running on the one hand and walking carrying something heavy like a backpack on the other ought to do it. I'm not sold on bodyweight squats for serious training unless we're talking one legged squats - that's different.
 

Kozushi

More than 2500 posts
Hello,

@Kozushi
I see you train a lot, and basically are quite active !


I usually do 3 boxing sessions a week, for a total of 4h30. Of course, this includes the technique and the sparring. Depending of the teacher we have, some sessions are more demanding than others. For instance, when we do 6 rounds, plus some interval of heavy bags, plus technique well...you end up quite done.

My "side training" is done everyday, first thing in the morning. It varies a lot. Currently, I do some "StrongFirst" roadwork, as follows:
300 rounds, 1 * 2 OAOL PU ES, 1 * 1 OA PU ES, 5 OA swings @40ES, during 20 minutes. During the day, I do multiple sets of regular push ups (up to 1000 a day, with full ROM and "regular pace"). For each set of push up, I do 1 pistol.

Otherwise, I walk a lot (up to 1h45 a day). We chose not having a car. Then I carry all the stuff (food, water...) everyday and never use the elevator. Eventually, I am always moving.


Yes this is true. You can make things harder by slowing down the eccentric phase and making the concentric more explosive. With a dip: you get down in 5 seconds, then no stop at the bottom (but still in full ROM) and get up in only 1s. I got good results using this. This is called "functional hypertrophy". There is plenty of information on it on the Charles Poliquin's website if you are interested in it. It works well !


Clearly, judokas, wrestlers, etc... are stronger than boxers. In boxing, we can work on max strength, to then progress on explosive strength and power. But there is less focus on this.

In the real world, I think judokas, wrestlers, etc...have a more "useful" strength (endurance for "heavy duty"). In fighting, I do not know. I think this is better to be a good judoka than a bad boxer, or a good boxer than a bad judoka. MMA may be the more "complete" ?

This is why I will never train especially for boxing. I practice boxing, but I train more for GPP than anything else !

Kind regards,

Pet'
I didn't have a car for years as an adult for the same philosohpical-exercise reason as you! Your level of activity is similar to mine but I think you're more active by a bit. I did just S&S and rings today and nothing else, for example.
 

pet'

More than 5000 posts
Hello,

Regarding lower body I think running on the one hand and walking carrying something heavy like a backpack on the other ought to do it. I'm not sold on bodyweight squats for serious training unless we're talking one legged squats - that's different.
+1 !

Everyday life can be used as a leg training (because this is the goal of the current post). For instance, instead of using the bus for all the way, you can stop 1 or 2 stations before, etc.. Carrying the water supply and the grocery in bags and backpack. All these kinds of things build strong legs and maintain / increase cardio-conditioning.

Pistol squat using GTG also works quite well and are convenient.

If a pure training session is more convenient, the best thing I found for the legs, using bodyweight only is as follows:
This is a squat regression (we start from the hardest variation we are able to do, then we do an easier one with minimum rest, then to another one with minimum rest, etc...)
Pistol squat > Cossack squat > Hindu squat > Regular squat > Lunge

Each regression works a bit as a drop set.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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