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Kettlebell Can you actually JUST use KB’s as a primary cardio?

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
How do you determine your goals for Zone 1 or Zone 2 or both? With walking with my dog, I can only do Zone 1. With a KB in hand, walking on sand (have a near by sand track field!) I can hit zone 2 with minimal possible impact on my joints but I don’t have any idea on how to decide which is better or from which one I need to do how much?

There are training protocols for in-season and off-season for rowing that provide targets for Zone 2 and Zone 5 work over the course of a season
 
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John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Steve, didn't one of the early RKC's train for a marathon or half-marathon, by just doing KB swings and/or Snatches? I remember him posting his routine and how the event went in comparison to times he trained only by running. I vaguely remember him saying it was mostly favorable, with little drop off. I thought he may have done 3 short runs a week, so his running muscles still were conditioned.
(edit:) I'm remembering it may have been Rob Lawrence?)
This article might be in a similar vein - a SFG used kettlebells to train for a sub-two hour half marathon.

 

TedDK

Level 5 Valued Member
This article might be in a similar vein - a SFG used kettlebells to train for a sub-two hour half marathon.

But why?
You shouldnt run much to do this?

I wouldnt train for a powerlifting meet with mostly running.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
But why?
You shouldnt run much to do this?

I wouldnt train for a powerlifting meet with mostly running.
Did you read the article? The article is specifically about a man who did not like to run but wanted to see if he could use kettlebells to prepare him for a half marathon, and he specially says at the end of the article he wouldn’t necessary recommend training like this - it was an experiment. And if you read the article he attempts to dissect the necessary qualities involved in a half marathon and then attempts to train them separately from running.

As for why I posted it, I was specifically replying to another member who was remembering an RKC/SFG who used mainly kettlebells to prep for a race, and I thought it was relevant to what he was thinking about.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
But why?
You shouldnt run much to do this?

I wouldnt train for a powerlifting meet with mostly running.
Pretty good older thread about using only or mostly intervals to train for a marathon. Nobody recommends it as a first choice but it can certainly work, and well in some cases.

 

Joel the Savage

Level 6 Valued Member
Whether I’m going neuperts snatch or giant protocols or Brett Jones IC (iron cardio, pun intended), for cardio i don’t do anything at all. I’m sure there are other threads on this and sorry if there are.
First of, it depends...
Actual studies (sciency-studies) show that swings are about 60% of VO2max of running. Snatches about 85%.
So me for example, I will not go out and jog cause I find it to boring. So for me kettlebells is a great cardio exercise cause I will do it. Way better than running, which I won't do.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
Interestingly, rowing results in higher VO2 and VE Max than running, but with a slightly lower HR.

VEmax was larger during rowing than during running (males, 157 +/- 16 vs. 147 +/- 13 L min(-1); 114 +/- 9 vs. 105 +/- 11 L min(-1), P<0.01). Also VO2max was larger during rowing than during running (males, 4.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.3 +/- 0.4 L min(-1); females, 3.3 +/- 0.4 vs. 3.2 +/- 0.4 L min(-1), P<0.01). However, HRmax was lower during rowing than during running (males, 194 +/- 8 vs. 198 +/- 11 beats min(-1); females, 192 +/- 6 vs. 196 +/- 8 beats min(-1), P<0.05). VEmax was correlated to body mass and fat-free mass, as was VO2max. Thus, the oxygen pulse (VO2max/HRmax) was larger during rowing than during running, while the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (VEmax/VO2max) was similar

 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

Here is something not really traditional about how to train for long running events but it seems to work though:

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Hello,

Here is something not really traditional about how to train for long running events but it seems to work though:

Kind regards,

Pet'
And yet at the same time… directly quoted from this guys article:

There’s little doubt that the best way to run your fastest race is to train with a lot of miles, most of them slow. This is how champion runners train,
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
Here is something not really traditional about how to train for long running events but it seems to work though:
That article talks about yet another use of S&S as a foundational, GPP program that can help one achieve other goals.

There’s little doubt that the best way to run your fastest race is to train with a lot of miles, most of them slow. This is how champion runners train,
One can't disagree with that statement, but some of us don't run slowly and run in good form at the same time, and I'm one such person.

My favorite expression from all of Dr. McGill's writings is "self-selecting," the idea that some pursuits aren't good for a few/some/many/most people and that, at the highest levels of those pursuits, you're looking at the people who can tolerate what they must go through (and you're not seeing all the people who dropped by the wayside). I consider myself such a person when it comes to long, easy distance running.

-S-
 

TedDK

Level 5 Valued Member
That article talks about yet another use of S&S as a foundational, GPP program that can help one achieve other goals.


One can't disagree with that statement, but some of us don't run slowly and run in good form at the same time, and I'm one such person.

My favorite expression from all of Dr. McGill's writings is "self-selecting," the idea that some pursuits aren't good for a few/some/many/most people and that, at the highest levels of those pursuits, you're looking at the people who can tolerate what they must go through (and you're not seeing all the people who dropped by the wayside). I consider myself such a person when it comes to long, easy distance running.

-S-
But if you and others cant tolerate Long runs fx. Then MT/HMT/IM and so om isnt the best thing to do.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

The way I view it is as follows: if one wants to be really good at something, one has to practice the craft per se. Running is no exception. Usually, the classic way to train is 70-80% of weekly volume in Z2. Roughly, the remaining portion is equally divided into interval work and sprint work (Z5). All this volume usually has to be done with running because running remains a skill.

If one do not like running, then, challenge aside, there is no reason to run an ultra. Almost everyone is able to run a 5K or 10k, assuming there is no previous injury or medical constraints. However not everyone can run a 10K in 30 minutes. Plus, being able to run a 10k without being injury during or afterwards does not mean one has good form. It may simply mean that one did not reach the threshold where poor form ends up in injury

GPP will obviously help, whether we use S&S as main tool or CF or whatever. For instance, will a military run / ruck faster and heavier than average ? Probably. Will he be able to lift more and more often than average ? Probably. However, will he be better than a professional runner ? Probably not.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 
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