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Kettlebell Can you actually JUST use KB’s as a primary cardio?

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
That article talks about yet another use of S&S as a foundational, GPP program that can help one achieve other goals.


One can't disagree with that statement, but some of us don't run slowly and run in good form at the same time, and I'm one such person.

My favorite expression from all of Dr. McGill's writings is "self-selecting," the idea that some pursuits aren't good for a few/some/many/most people and that, at the highest levels of those pursuits, you're looking at the people who can tolerate what they must go through (and you're not seeing all the people who dropped by the wayside). I consider myself such a person when it comes to long, easy distance running.

-S-
Well the term ‘slowly’ was the articles author, not mine. This is one reason I object to the term LSD; at least to those who will listen. :cool:
The term better used is LED, with the E standing for Easy. In the context of running, cycling, and other locomotive endeavors Easy does not have to be synonymous with Slow.
 

PeterLuffman

Level 6 Valued Member
Whether I’m going neuperts snatch or giant protocols or Brett Jones IC (iron cardio, pun intended), for cardio i don’t do anything at all. I’m sure there are other threads on this and sorry if there are.

I walk all day at work. Sometimes 3-6 miles a day, sometimes more or less. Would you count this as getting some form of cardio? I dont Mean to sound silly but I’m just really curious on what can be sufficient for getting your cardio with bells without having to actually do regular cardio.

Walking is great, if you are doing lots of walking you are active, but you are not aerobically fit. That's something different unless your walking is uphill and moves your HR into zone 2 (130-150bpm).

The KB protocols you mention will work your cardio-vascular system, but not as optimally as more traditional cardio methods.

Running, cycling and skiing for example elicit 100% maximal oxygen uptake, they increase stroke volume and build a larger heart that can pump blood around your body with less beats. The KB training protocols you mention will elicit about 30% maximal oxygen uptake. So you are doing something for your metabolic health, but you'd certainly benefit from some steady state cardio done 1-2 per week. Of course adherence is the biggest factor in all of this. If you enjoy it, you keep doing it.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I wonder if something like the 10k challenge could be done aerobically, due to the fact that these are not "HardStyle". For instance, using a breathing ladder or something along these lines

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Bill Lets

Level 5 Valued Member
My two cents.

Your a big guy fifty three to fifty eight range is not extremely low so you are probably good. It may be a good idea to get tested for hypothyroidism, symptoms include weight gain and slowed heart rate, also called bradycardia.

I have hypo my heart rate while at rest can be in the low forties. I take Armor Thyroid which brings my levels within a normal range also iodine.

side note* Frank Zane would take Armor for pre contest to shed some fat (as if he had any).
My resting heart rate in the mornings is usually 53-58….
 

Sam Goldner

Level 5 Valued Member
Yes, there are studies that show those benefits associated with aerobic fitness…but there’s more than one way to get “aerobic fitness” and more than one way to get those same benefits from “just” strength training or walking even if you want to say those won’t helps. Your aerobic fitness or don’t count as cardio.

Again, Joel is fantastic and has WAY more experience than I do in training athletes and in focusing on conditioning as a specialty. That definitely counts. However, he’s not actually backing up his key statement in this post that “Lifting weights and going for walks to get your steps in simply is not enough if your goal is to maximize your health and live the longest life free of disease possible.” He‘s brilliant, he’s experienced, but I don’t know if what he wrote is true; it’s educated conjecture.
 

TedDK

Level 5 Valued Member
Yes, there are studies that show those benefits associated with aerobic fitness…but there’s more than one way to get “aerobic fitness” and more than one way to get those same benefits from “just” strength training or walking even if you want to say those won’t helps. Your aerobic fitness or don’t count as cardio.

Again, Joel is fantastic and has WAY more experience than I do in training athletes and in focusing on conditioning as a specialty. That definitely counts. However, he’s not actually backing up his key statement in this post that “Lifting weights and going for walks to get your steps in simply is not enough if your goal is to maximize your health and live the longest life free of disease possible.” He‘s brilliant, he’s experienced, but I don’t know if what he wrote is true; it’s educated conjecture.
Do you back anything up? ;-)
 

Boris Bachmann

Level 7 Valued Member
Do you back anything up? ;-)
Fwiw, I agree w. Sam. I think there will eventually be a corpus of research showing that, for example, a continuous hour of (lighter) kettlebell snatches is as good as just about any other more traditional aerobic exercise, but that day might be a long way off. If SF or some other organization would help organize and fund it, well maybe it could happen sooner rather than later but who knows?
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Fwiw, I agree w. Sam. I think there will eventually be a corpus of research showing that, for example, a continuous hour of (lighter) kettlebell snatches is as good as just about any other more traditional aerobic exercise, but that day might be a long way off. If SF or some other organization would help organize and fund it, well maybe it could happen sooner rather than later but who knows?
I’m assuming here that when you say “is as good as” you are talking about heart health?
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Fwiw, I agree w. Sam. I think there will eventually be a corpus of research showing that, for example, a continuous hour of (lighter) kettlebell snatches is as good as just about any other more traditional aerobic exercise, but that day might be a long way off. If SF or some other organization would help organize and fund it, well maybe it could happen sooner rather than later but who knows?
I'll volunteer as a guinea pig!
 
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