Cheap substitute for gripper

Tarzan

More than 500 posts
How does it compare to a #1 COC gripper Steve ?

I know some of those clamps have a surprisingly strong little spring in them.

My dodgy old pliers had the cutting jaws worn down almost flat and cutting through heavy gauge steel wire was tougher than closing a #1 COC gripper. I had some jobs where I'd have skin off my hands after using them all day. In the end it was tougher to cut wire than closing a #2 COC gripper and I had use 2 hands to get the job done.

I don't know why I kept those pliers for so long, but they did strengthen my hands, after I bought a new set I could chop through almost anything with them using one hand.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Senior Certified Instructor
@Tarzan, I don't do gripper work much at all these days - I spend too much time playing musical instruments and it's too hard on my hands. Barbell deadlifts and kettlebell swings for me, thank you. I know I could figure out a way to work back into using grippers but there are only so many hours in my day, and barbell deadlifts and kettlebell swings both offer so much for a small amount of time invested in regular training.

I didn't actually compare the $2 clamp with any of my C of C grippers, just guesstimating that it was like a trainer - I have a T and a #1 and more here, and if I can locate them, I'll try to make a more proper comparison later today.

-S-
 

Harry Westgate

More than 500 posts
On the subject of reducing torn up hands from grip training, I purchased Beyond Bodybuilding the other day, not so much because I was looking for a new routine, but more because I just fancied reading another strength training book from Pavel. In the Naked Warrior chapter, Pavel talks about bodyweight grip training, and I am so glad to have found this gem!

The exercise I really like from this chapter is the 'grip-up' - plant your hand(s) on the wall, edge your feet away from it,and, without hyperextending the fingers (that's cheating), kind of claw your hand up to push your palm away from the wall, a bit like flexing your forearm for a wrist curl.

I've found this exercise to be an awesome way to not tear up the skin on my hands, whereas grippers can be rough if you're not careful, so I've started alternating GTG sets of gripper reps and grip-ups to save my hands from getting too torn up while still strengthening my hands.
 

Steve W.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
My dodgy old pliers had the cutting jaws worn down almost flat and cutting through heavy gauge steel wire was tougher than closing a #1 COC gripper. I had some jobs where I'd have skin off my hands after using them all day. In the end it was tougher to cut wire than closing a #2 COC gripper and I had use 2 hands to get the job done.

I don't know why I kept those pliers for so long, but they did strengthen my hands, after I bought a new set I could chop through almost anything with them using one hand.
IIRC, John Brookfield has recommended cutting wire with pliers as a hand exercise.
 

banzaiengr

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I have an old Ivanko I bought from Perry Radar years ago. It has two adjustable springs on it so the tension can be adjusted. Warren Tetting even thought those were o.k. : ) I still think there's nothing better than modeling clay. You can really training many different finger movements with it. Grip strength was always my weak link in wrestling. I was not one of those guys who grabbed you and you thought you were in a vise. I'll have to post a pic of the Ivanko.
 
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