Other/Mixed could you explain TRM?

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)
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elli

Level 9 Valued Member

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
A certain set TRM, like the 5TRM, is five reps you can do with perfect form on each of the reps. If 5 was your TRM, when you tried to do a sixth rep, some part of your form would be compromised. In the squat example one could do 5 reps just like each one of them looked the same, but on the sixth, the weight comes up, but the movement slows down and the upper body angle changes less vertical. So, even if in the example the person could squat six reps, her TRM is only 5 reps, since for 5 reps the technique was spot on and it broke on the sixth. The sixth was still a squat, and would have got three white lights in a squat competition, but it didn't have the desired form anymore.
 

elli

Level 9 Valued Member
A certain set TRM, like the 5TRM, is five reps you can do with perfect form on each of the reps. If 5 was your TRM, when you tried to do a sixth rep, some part of your form would be compromised. In the squat example one could do 5 reps just like each one of them looked the same, but on the sixth, the weight comes up, but the movement slows down and the upper body angle changes less vertical. So, even if in the example the person could squat six reps, her TRM is only 5 reps, since for 5 reps the technique was spot on and it broke on the sixth. The sixth was still a squat, and would have got three white lights in a squat competition, but it didn't have the desired form anymore.
Got that! Thank you.
Applying this to bodyweight training it is not the weight I am using but the progression I pick, e.g. kneeling push ups, regular push ups, feet elevated etc.?!
 

jca17

Level 5 Valued Member
So if you're going for a rep max with a given variation, you would see how many you could do before your form changes. For pushups, you'd stop counting as soon as your lower back sagged, or your upper back felt engaged differently etc. With barbell, you can see how much weight you can lift with perfect form for a given number of reps. Since weight isn't the variable you're changing with bodyweight exercises, its easier to count the number of reps.

That might have been confusing. If you are doing any exercise where you can change the weight, you pick a number of reps and find how much weight you can do without form changing. If you can't change the weight (bodyweight) you pick a variation and count the number of reps you do with perfect form. Fixed weight - see how many reps. Adjustable weight - fix number of reps and find your limit by increasing weight.
 

elli

Level 9 Valued Member
So if you're going for a rep max with a given variation, you would see how many you could do before your form changes. For pushups, you'd stop counting as soon as your lower back sagged, or your upper back felt engaged differently etc. With barbell, you can see how much weight you can lift with perfect form for a given number of reps. Since weight isn't the variable you're changing with bodyweight exercises, its easier to count the number of reps.

That might have been confusing. If you are doing any exercise where you can change the weight, you pick a number of reps and find how much weight you can do without form changing. If you can't change the weight (bodyweight) you pick a variation and count the number of reps you do with perfect form. Fixed weight - see how many reps. Adjustable weight - fix number of reps and find your limit by increasing weight.
Thank you for your reply.:)
Now I know more and think about strucutring my programme like it is described regarding to sets and reps in the article I have mentioned above.
Thank you @Antti once again!
 
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