Critique my two handed swing.

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Hi @Nick_The_Painter

It's a start!

Your setup is OK, but get in a bit more of a flat back position (think "arch the back" just a bit) and put the kettlebell further out in front of you to start with, and hike it back strongly.

Hinge position is really good. Gaze is good. Shoulders are good. Stance is good.

The main thing you're missing is a QUICK and FORCEFUL (Explosive, like a vertical jump) movement from hinge to plank. Don't think about the kettlebell. Just snap into the standing plank position, and that movement will "throw" the bell. Don't lift it with the arms... the arms stay relaxed.

Keep after it and post another video or let us know if you have questions.

I would ask if you're anywhere near an SFG... but that's sadly not a good option, currently :(
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 7 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
The hips drive the bell in the swing.

Here's a drill that may work for your case..


It may be worth exploring working online with an SFG given this pandemic
 

Nick_The_Painter

Level 1 Valued Member
Thanks everyone, hugely appreciated. I think my hip hinge is probably not too bad because of my judo but the finer points definitely need work, one to one with an instructor would be best I agree! Anyway I shall try both suggestions and also re read S&S and try and get the hip snap while tensing the glutes.
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 7 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
OK since you do judo let's try applying a similar concept..

Work your hike pass.. Hike pass is the uchikomi of kettlebells ballistics

Focus on letting the hips snap forward and dig your feet to the ground.. The bell will float and feel weightless if done properly
 

Nick_The_Painter

Level 1 Valued Member
I like that analogy, so in short the hike pass in the fulcrum? If so that makes sense, I know when I've done it properly because the kettlebell floats up but obviously consistency is key. Thanks for the advice.
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 7 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
I like that analogy, so in short the hike pass in the fulcrum? If so that makes sense, I know when I've done it properly because the kettlebell floats up but obviously consistency is key. Thanks for the advice.
Yes although I usually use the slingshot analogy...

Same thing as a properly executed throw.. You won't have to use any force, it will feel light and almost effortless
 

Nick_The_Painter

Level 1 Valued Member

So I've taken all that was said on board and tried to drive through the hips with a snap and the kettlebell does feel like its just floating up more so now which I think is a good sign.

All comments welcome.
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 7 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
So there is some improvement.. Now let us work on the timing of when you need to break at the hips..

Watch your video again.. Notice that as soon as the bell reaches its peak height you almost instantly break at the hips?

You want to hold your plank longer..

So wait til your arms connects with your torso, then break at the hips.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Think "tighter and faster"....

Something like this is what we're trying to coach you towards:

 
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