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Kettlebell De-Loading Options Post-Cert

Ryan Arnold

First Post
Certified Instructor
Good Morning,
I recently became SFG I certified and have been trying to figure out how to move forward over the next couple of months.
Does anybody have any thoughts on a period of time in a de-loading regimen (Lighter weight, less 'intense' practices) and duration?
I do not feel as though I have plateaued, but I've been training for 18 months straight now, 9 of those months at 5 days a week. Would some de-loading time be of benefit?
Thanks in advance for your input!
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
thoughts on a period of time in a de-loading regimen (Lighter weight, less 'intense' practices) and duration?
Periodization Training

Periodization Training is a key to maintaining lerm term progress.

It consisist of planned progressive loading with pushing the exercise to failure or near failure in final week of the Traning Cycle.

Once that final high intensity week is achieved, a New Training Cycle is begun with a light load with the loading progressing again to the final week.

"Training Age"

The length of a Training Cycle is determine by an individual's "Training Age"; how long one as been training, not their chronoligical age.

1) Novice Lifters

These individuals adapt slowly. Thus, they can perform the same training for about 6-8 weeks before they need to change it.

2) Advance Lifters

Advanced Lifter adapt quickly. Their training need to be more frequently changed; every 3-4 weeks.

Short DeLoads and ReLoads

Short Term DeLoads and ReLoads are ineffective for Long Term Results.

I do not feel as though I have plateaued, but I've been training for 18 months straight now,

More Effective Approach

Training for 18 months without a plateau means you haven't pushed it hard enough.

Periodization Trainng is planned cycles that employ Recovery Periods that are in the first part of a New Training Program. Recovery is where the body increases size and strength, dependent on how the program is written.

The final week of a Periodization Training Cycle is where the muscles are overloaded; which trigger a greater anabolic effect, when followed with a New Training Program with a lighter load. This method evokes "Active Recovery".
 
Last edited:

Ryan Arnold

First Post
Certified Instructor
Hi @Ryan Arnold ! Welcome to the forum and congrats on SFG I.

I think a week of deload post-cert is enough. Then, back to training! Do you have a new goal or objective to aim for?
Thanks Anna!
At this time, my main goal is to increase my press weight in order to prepare for SFG II in a couple of years and possibly make a run at Sinister down the road. Before I began training for SFG I, I made timed simple and since then I replaced the 32kg with the 40kg on swings and 20% of the get-ups.
 

Ryan Arnold

First Post
Certified Instructor
Periodization Training

Periodization Training is a key to maintaining lerm term progress.

It consisist of planned progressive loading with pushing the exercise to failure or near failure in final week of the Traning Cycle.

Once that final high intensity week is achieved, a New Training Cycle is begun with a light load with the loading progressing again to the final week.

"Training Age"

The length of a Training Cycle is determine by an individual's "Training Age"; how long one as been training, not their chronoligical age.

1) Novice Lifters

These individuals adapt slowly. Thus, they can perform the same training for about 6-8 weeks before they need to change it.

2) Advance Lifters

Advanced Lifter adapt quickly. Their training need to be more frequently changed; every 3-4 weeks.

Short DeLoads and ReLoads

Short Term DeLoads and ReLoads are ineffective for Long Term Results.



More Effective Approach

Training for 18 months without a plateau means you haven't pushed it hard enough.

Periodization Trainng is planned cycles that employ Recovery Periods that are in the first part of a New Training Program. Recovery is where the body increases size and strength, dependent on how the program is written.

The final week of a Periodization Training Cycle is where the muscles are overloaded; which trigger a greater anabolic effect, when followed with a New Training Program with a lighter load. This method evokes "Active Recovery".
Thank you for the insight Kenny,
Most of my practicing was involved with the technical aspects of learning the lifts as well as simple and sinister, so I can see the point about not pushing hard enough.
I hadn't thought of recovery like that. Thank you for sharing.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
Thanks Anna!
At this time, my main goal is to increase my press weight in order to prepare for SFG II in a couple of years and possibly make a run at Sinister down the road. Before I began training for SFG I, I made timed simple and since then I replaced the 32kg with the 40kg on swings and 20% of the get-ups.
I had similar goals after my SFG I, and did SFG II just under 2 years later. In between I did a lot of A+A heavy swing and snatch protocols, and deadlifting. I might suggested barbell work to build your press strength if you are so inclined, but it's not necessary. Most people probably recommend some time with ROP for pressing. S&S, Q&D, ROP... can't go wrong with any of those. I'd say pick a program that appeals to you and work it for a while... and DON'T WORRY about the things you're not doing while you do the program... i.e. don't try to maintain everything you learned at SFG I and related stuff by keeping them all fresh... they'll come back quickly when you do them again later.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Does anybody have any thoughts on a period of time in a de-loading regimen (Lighter weight, less 'intense' practices) and duration?

I know I love how lifting makes me feel, so after a big event, I stop and only start again when I start missing it. I use it as a time to walk more, stretch more, catch up on yard work, and the like. A week is a nice amount of time to target, IMO, but as I get older, sometimes it's more like 10 days. When I start up again, I'll go down a size for things like presses and swings to start, again transitioning back to more normal working weights by feel.

One thought I keep in mind: a recovery period not only _can_ cause you to lose strength and conditioning, it _should_ do that. You need to let go of some of your fitness and then work back to where you were and hopefully beyond.

-S-
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
@Ryan Arnold - welcome and congrats! I think it depends on how you feel. I took an easy week to recover (physically). Mentally I am tired of the “pressure” so am taking some time to train but without much specific focus or goals. I use training for more than just a physical outlet, so I don’t like much time down, but I’m taking the pressure off for a while.

That might sound like the opposite of a lot of what people hear, but it’s something *I* need. For my training, that looks like a lot of “punch the clock” workouts focusing more on easy strength development, with a baseline of 50-60% “conditioning” training (so if I can do 100 reps in 5 min when I push it, I do more like a 10 reps OTM, as an example). Almost all of the mental pressure for me came from the snatch test, so dialing that work down takes most of the mental pressure off. Keeping it at 50-60% helps me maintain some measure of that without the stress.
 

Mike Torres

Level 6 Valued Member
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
I use these times to explore / practice and don't worry about doing ANYTHING prescribed.

I typically, 1) keep the sessions short, light, and focused (no more than 30 mins all-in) and 2) don't plan them in advance so I can just follow my curiosity. I'm not focused on a goal or an outcome, I'm simply moving my body based on whatever I feel like doing. I usually train on vacation this way too.

Some of my go-to kettlebell options: 5 swings on the minute for 30 minutes, 5 snatches on the minute for 20 minutes, "Iron Cardio" (I usually do single-arm clean, press, squat, snatch on the minute for 20-30 minutes), a couple Easy Strength barbell lifts, Q&D (either swings/push-ups or snatches), or what I'll be doing tomorrow as I recover from being sick: the Moving Target Complex (see the article). The goal for me is just to have some fun. No pressure.

This usually doesn't last long (a week, maybe a few) and then I get the itch to get back to focused training.
 
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