Deadlift form feedback please

guardian7

More than 500 posts
Could I have feedback on my DL form please.

This is rep 2 of 5 of a PTTP set. I do a full reset after each rep. Last workout, I failed my previous attempt with double overhand but with the advice of this board just kept going with the first session using a mixed grip. I am 50 years old. 75KG.

This is a RPE of about 7.5, so it is good for a form check. A park bench workout.


Self-analysis:

Shoulders rounded from poor posture, back OK, not good, but adequate and not dangerous.
Leaked a bit of tightness after wedging in the split second before initiating the lift.
Hinge a bit shallow between stiff leg and conventional DL. Tight hamstrings maybe.

The rack on the ground is required by the health club due to noise of dropping plates from the floor below. I am unable to change the music....
 

Anna C

> 6k Posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Could I have feedback on my DL form please.

This is rep 2 of 5 of a PTTP set. I do a full reset after each rep. Last workout, I failed my previous attempt with double overhand but with the advice of this board just kept going with the first session using a mixed grip. I am 50 years old. 75KG.

This is a RPE of about 7.5, so it is good for a form check. A park bench workout.


Self-analysis:

Shoulders rounded from poor posture, back OK, not good, but adequate and not dangerous.
Leaked a bit of tightness after wedging in the split second before initiating the lift.
Hinge a bit shallow between stiff leg and conventional DL. Tight hamstrings maybe.

The rack on the ground is required by the health club due to noise of dropping plates from the floor below. I am unable to change the music....
Looks basically good, @guardian7
  • I would agree with your self-analysis.
  • You might get more t-spine extension by focusing on squeezing your chest up before the lift.
  • You give just a bit of a yank at the beginning of the lift -- if you combine the "squeeze the chest up" with "make the arms long and almost squeeze the bar off the floor/rack", THEN start the actual lift, you'll avoid any yanking or loss of tension. I like to tell students to hear the click of the collar as part of this step before the bar actually rises.
  • You are almost fully extending your knees before you extend your hips (see photo below). Try moving just a bit towards extending them together. Not so much that you have to move the bar around bent knees, but just so you're not trying to do the whole last part of the lift with your back and hips. The "chest up" cue can help with this too, giving you a tendency to be a bit more upright sooner.
  • Lockout looks good.
That is an interesting rack...

1584126662511.png
 

Anna C

> 6k Posts
Elite Certified Instructor
One more thing to add -- your descent.

If you let the bar fall with gravity, it doesn't matter much what your back does. But if you lower the bar any more slowly than gravity (which you are), there is load on your back while descending. Therefore you want to maintain your torso tension and don't let the weight pull your back any farther into flexion.

IMO, if you're descending with load, your back should look the same on the way down as it does on the way up. Don't lose any tension or position until you are unloaded.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
Looks basically good, @guardian7
  • I would agree with your self-analysis.
  • You might get more t-spine extension by focusing on squeezing your chest up before the lift.
  • You give just a bit of a yank at the beginning of the lift -- if you combine the "squeeze the chest up" with "make the arms long and almost squeeze the bar off the floor/rack", THEN start the actual lift, you'll avoid any yanking or loss of tension. I like to tell students to hear the click of the collar as part of this step before the bar actually rises.
  • You are almost fully extending your knees before you extend your hips (see photo below). Try moving just a bit towards extending them together. Not so much that you have to move the bar around bent knees, but just so you're not trying to do the whole last part of the lift with your back and hips. The "chest up" cue can help with this too, giving you a tendency to be a bit more upright sooner.
  • Lockout looks good.
That is an interesting rack...

View attachment 9953
The rack means that I can't wedge well and hear the clink. I am not supposed to drop the bar but I will be more aware of losing form on the negative. Thanks as always. I forgot to mention the chest up cue. I noticed that too.

Any cues or progressions to work on timing the hinge better?
 

Anna C

> 6k Posts
Elite Certified Instructor
Any cues or progressions to work on timing the hinge better?
"Chest up" can help you extend the hips sooner, in addition to a stronger t-spine extension. What I like to do is take a light warm-up weight and experiment with the timing until I find that happy medium. With that light weight, do some reps at both extremes -- hips first, then knees.... then try knees first, then hips... adjust towards the middle until you feel a coordinated effort that keeps the weight balanced over mid-foot all the way up, keeps the bar against your legs and moving in a straight vertical path, keeps that wedged feeling with all muscles engaged all the way up. Then practice replicating that up to and including your working weight.
 
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