Deadlift with resistance bands

Timo Keskitalo

Triple-Digit Post Count
Getting back to the original question: do you have a power rack from which you could hang the bar? That setup you can measure with some accuracy by loading the bar to see how high it hangs.

That said, does anyone have experience with hangbar DL? Mine is that I hurt my back with it. I thought I used moderate weight for speed pulls.

But maybe it was too much. I had used 120kg bar a month before, and I think my setup was 100/118kg. Could be a little more My max at the time could be as low as 150-160kg. In percentage 67%/79% or 62%/74%
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Getting back to the original question: do you have a power rack from which you could hang the bar? That setup you can measure with some accuracy by loading the bar to see how high it hangs.
Reverse Loading Band Resistance Measurement

Reverse loading the bar by hanging them from the top of the rack provides some feed back on the amount of resistance that is decreased/subtracted in the Deadlift or another movement; where the 45 lb bar is zeroed out at a certain length of the stretched bands.

That works for Reverse Band Loaded Deadlifts or other movement fairly well.

However, it requires more math in determining the amount of resistance added to the bar for...

Bottom Loading Band Resistance Measurement

For a Bottom Loading Band Resistance Movement, the quickest and easiest method of determining the amount of resistance is a...

Fish Scale
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Juslike-...gital-Fish-Hook-Hanging-Scale-Black/878508583

Just pull the one of the band up to the height you want measured, then hook the fish scale to the band.

Since you are only measuring the resistance of one band, you then multiple by two if you are using two band to obtain the total amount of resistance.


If you are only using one band, as illustrated in FinleyB's post, just measure the one band's resistance.

The cost of the Fish Scale is less than $15.00. It measures weight resistance up to 50 kg/110 lb.

...does anyone have experience with hangbar DL? Mine is that I hurt my back with it. I thought I used moderate weight for speed pulls.
Experience With Reverse Band Loading

The majority of my training involves some type of Accommodating Resistance Training with bands, chains and/or bungees.

Other members here have also used Reverse Band Loading.

I usually use Bottom Up Loading and occasionally perform Reverse Band Loading. Essentially, they provide the same training effect.

It's hard to know why you hurt you back with Reverse Band Loading at this point.

But maybe it was too much.
Base on the information you provided, it doesn't appear that you were performing them with too much weight.

I used moderate weight for speed pulls.
Speed Training Misnomer

For some reason, years ago, the term Speed Training was incorrectly used and continues to be used for Power Training; more on that in a second.

Speed Training with Traditional Strength Training Exercises employs load of 10 - 40% of your 1 Repetition Max Training Load, with around 30% of your 1 Repetition Max being the sweet spot.

In percentage 67%/79% or 62%/74%
Power Training Percentages

For the development of Power with Traditional Strength Training Exercises, like the Deadlift, percentages of 48 to 62% of your 1 Repetition Max fall into the optimal zone.

That means your 62% was in the Power Zone and your 67% may have been, as well. Some individual may be able to produce Power with up 67%; but not that many.

However, your 74% and 79% were out of the Power Zone Training Protocol. That mean you end up eliciting a different training effect; shifting it more into the Limit Strength Training area.

If your focus is on Band Loading more for Limit Strength, using higher percentages will be effective.

However, if you objective is Band Loading to increase Power, performing the movement with a higher percentage is counter productive. You aren't training or developing Power.

Kenny Croxdale
 
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