all posts post new thread

Other/Mixed Direct core work has been a game changer for me

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

Opiaswing

Level 5 Valued Member
It has not only *noticeably* changed how strong and stable I feel on a daily basis in everyday tasks, but it has done wonders for my posture and strength overall.

I've been doing predominantly hardstyle plank working up to variations with longer leverage such as superman planks and have now began incorporating some ab wheel work.

I have been training for years and years with no idea how weak my core was almost to the point of dysfunction; pelvic tilt, flared ribs, thoracic extension, etc.

Any other exercises I'm missing that are worth incorporating ?
 

Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
Any other exercises I'm missing that are worth incorporating ?
take a look at the Stu McGill Big Three .

I have been regularly doing the hardstyle plank plus the Big 3 and I'm feeling similarly about how my abs seem to have lagged behind the rest of my strength acquisitions.

Bird Dog
Side Planks (insert plank in between sides)
Curl Up

10 seconds per hold for each position runs me a few minutes whenever I get up from my desk.
and apparently, Stu McGill explains against extending the hold beyond 10 seconds.

We'll see if I can pass my plank test in October as a result. 90s minimum (for my age)
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
It has not only *noticeably* changed how strong and stable I feel on a daily basis in everyday tasks, but it has done wonders for my posture and strength overall.

I've been doing predominantly hardstyle plank working up to variations with longer leverage such as superman planks and have now began incorporating some ab wheel work.

I have been training for years and years with no idea how weak my core was almost to the point of dysfunction; pelvic tilt, flared ribs, thoracic extension, etc.

Any other exercises I'm missing that are worth incorporating ?


3rd vid, short version. Old 12 min. foundation also very good, 7.4 mill. views

 
Last edited:

TedM

Level 5 Valued Member
It has not only *noticeably* changed how strong and stable I feel on a daily basis in everyday tasks, but it has done wonders for my posture and strength overall.

I've been doing predominantly hardstyle plank working up to variations with longer leverage such as superman planks and have now began incorporating some ab wheel work.

I have been training for years and years with no idea how weak my core was almost to the point of dysfunction; pelvic tilt, flared ribs, thoracic extension, etc.

Any other exercises I'm missing that are worth incorporating ?
Have you also worked in OS resets? That could be beneficial for what you are describing.
 

Boris Bachmann

Level 7 Valued Member
For many years, I didn't do ab work and was fine for a while, but eventually I was having more lower back issues.

I've found that as long as I'm keeping push-ups, pull-ups, and kettlebell work (snatches and windmills in particular) in the rotation, then I'm generally covered.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Elite Certified Instructor
It has not only *noticeably* changed how strong and stable I feel on a daily basis in everyday tasks, but it has done wonders for my posture and strength overall.

I've been doing predominantly hardstyle plank working up to variations with longer leverage such as superman planks and have now began incorporating some ab wheel work.

I have been training for years and years with no idea how weak my core was almost to the point of dysfunction; pelvic tilt, flared ribs, thoracic extension, etc.

Any other exercises I'm missing that are worth incorporating ?

I would look to the book Hard Style Abs for some ideas.

-S-
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
It has not only *noticeably* changed how strong and stable I feel on a daily basis in everyday tasks, but it has done wonders for my posture and strength overall.

I've been doing predominantly hardstyle plank working up to variations with longer leverage such as superman planks and have now began incorporating some ab wheel work.

I have been training for years and years with no idea how weak my core was almost to the point of dysfunction; pelvic tilt, flared ribs, thoracic extension, etc.

Any other exercises I'm missing that are worth incorporating ?

Try Pilates 100

I also like weighted around the worlds.

I usually use a 16 kg KB or a 10 kg plate.
 
Last edited:

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
Deadbugs are highly recommended by Geoff Neupert and Aleks Salkin, contributors to the SF site. I did a whole accessory program from Aleks Salkin based on them. I also recommend OS resets. Hardstyle Abs from Pavel as a good floor progression for hanging leg raises. Working on L-sits as it addresses core, thoracic opening, pelvic tilt, hip flexor, etc. while performing the movement is worth trying out.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
Deadbugs are highly recommended by Geoff Neupert and Aleks Salkin, contributors to the SF site. I did a whole accessory program from Aleks Salkin based on them. I also recommend OS resets. Hardstyle Abs from Pavel as a good floor progression for hanging leg raises. Working on L-sits as it addresses core, thoracic opening, pelvic tilt, hip flexor, etc. while performing the movement is worth trying out.

Deadbugs are a good start.

But after doing them for a few months, you get to a point where scaling them becomes a problem because you have to basically slow them down, and hold the positions for long periods of time.

It eventually just takes too long compared to doing something I can load to make it harder.
 

guardian7

Level 6 Valued Member
Deadbugs are a good start.

But after doing them for a few months, you get to a point where scaling them becomes a problem because you have to basically slow them down, and hold the positions for long periods of time.

It eventually just takes too long compared to doing something I can load to make it harder.

You can load deadbugs, but it should be done with caution. Yes, I meant for those who have not done them as a place to start. The OP asked for suggestions.
 

Hung

Level 7 Valued Member
Deadbugs are a good start.

But after doing them for a few months, you get to a point where scaling them becomes a problem because you have to basically slow them down, and hold the positions for long periods of time.

It eventually just takes too long compared to doing something I can load to make it harder.
Basic plank work very well when loaded. I use my gf
 

Pasibrzuch

Level 6 Valued Member
I will go with something less obvious, i.e. isometric neck training. These exercises come from a Polish coach based in UK, Andrzej "Wodyn" Roszkowski. All exercises are done 3x5s. Perform before a training session. Keep packed neck during all exercises.
Exercise 1: Put both hands on the back of your head, elbows facing forward. Push on your head. Resist with the base of your skull, tucking your chin.
Exercise 2: put the base of your palms on your eyebrows, elbows facing forward. Push and resist with your neck.
Exercise 3: place one hand with the base of your palm behind right behind your ear, fingers parallel to the ground, elbow flared to one side. Push, resist with your neck. Do on both sides.
Exercise 4: Place one hand as in exercise 3. Clench a fist of the other hand and place it on your chin from the other side. Press with your hands as if you wanted to twist your neck, but resist with your neck (hopefully).
Here's a video explaining why and how to train the neck. It's in Polish, but I put it here to give the credit when the credit is due.

If it's too convoluted a description let me know, I will clarify.

Besides that I like performing a modified neck bridge, but only the back version - the front one causes pain for me.

Another exercise come from a Polish PT, Marek Purczyński. I call it a spiral plank. Here is a link of a video with a tutorial. It's in Polish again , but the visuals are enough to understand it - reflexive tension will do its job. It can be done with a 90 degree bent in your knee (easier) or with straight legs (harder). If you feel a stretch while folding in this particular fashion, spend some time performing just the stretch without lifting your stomach from the ground (that's suggested by the author).

More obvious stuff:
  • dead bugs, but with the head pressing into the ground, legs straight, actively digging the heel of the down leg into the ground. I find it to work more on the deep abs than the "traditional" dead bug that gives you a burn in the superficial musculature.
  • copehhagen planks
  • bird dogs
  • side planks
 

TedM

Level 5 Valued Member
Deadbugs are a good start.

But after doing them for a few months, you get to a point where scaling them becomes a problem because you have to basically slow them down, and hold the positions for long periods of time.

It eventually just takes too long compared to doing something I can load to make it harder.
Personally curious: What is the goal which requires "scaling" or "harder"?
(In other words... what's "good enough "?
 
Top Bottom