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Barbell Do these exercises work the entire body?

Warzone2022

Level 4 Valued Member
I'm in a training rut due to being unable to do overhead pressing, the rut is that I know overhead pressing is important and is part of all popular strength routines such as 531 for example, but due to physical and disability reasons I cant overhead press.

So although I'd love to do 531 bbb without overhead press, everywhere I look its very cult like surrounding the overhead press and i cant find any useful 531 bbb routines without it.

So first of all is it detrimental to remove ohp from routines?

Also, due to not finding a routine to fit my needs, ive come up with this plan

Mon
Squat
Curl

Wed
Bench
Row

Fri
Deadlift
Pulldown

Does this hit the whole body?
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
I think there are a lot of programs that don't incorporate the OHP, and while it is a good full body exercise, you can still see great progress without it. Starting Strength uses the press OR bench press, PTTP uses a press of your choice and often that choice is bench press or floor press, Faleev 5x5 uses a bench press with no OHP option, etc. If I was in your position I would just omit it and do the rest of the program as written, or replace it with a press you can do like dips.
 

LukeV

Level 6 Valued Member
I’m a big fan of abbreviated training but due to injury have had long periods of time when I was unable to perform certain staple exercises, most notably OHP and bench due to shoulder issues, pull-ups and rows due to elbow issues and deadlift due to elbow and back issues. Yet here I am at 52 years old and no-one looks at me in the gym and comments on any short-coming in physique. The fact is unless you intend to compete no particular exercise is essential and every gap can be worked around. If you can’t do X, just do Y. For my part, when I couldn’t OHP I could sometimes still bench with a reasonable incline and even when pressing was pretty much out altogether a slow partial movement on a dip machine kept my arms and shoulders looking good for the months it took for a shoulder to heal. When restricted by injury consider these things: reduce the weight/increase the reps, slow the motion (incl going very slow), do a partial movement (eg pull-ups stop with your eyes level with the bar or board press), consider another exercise on the same or an adjacent plane of movement (eg bench v floor v incline v decline), consider exercises that work the same muscle group but on a different plane (eg bench v dips or rows v pull down), try isometrics (I’ve never tried it but some reputable people on here are big fans). Just do whatever it takes to keep exercising safely and you’ll not notice the difference in the long-term
 
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North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
@Michael Brian Turner

I scrubbed heavy and/or high volume OHP years ago due to degenerative disks in my neck. I haven't missed it and don't subscribe to the school that places a high level of importance on OHP. Horizontal push and horizontal pull covers upper body basics very well.

Your intended exercise selection will work the whole body, I'd consider sneaking some triceps work in there if doing curls separately too.
 

Dayz

Level 6 Valued Member
In a few places Wendler has explicitly said you can swap OHP for any other compound pressing exercise. He suggests close grip bench, and also Floor Press and incline. Easy fix you can run BBB with any of those.
 

Alan Mackey

Level 6 Valued Member
I'm in a training rut due to being unable to do overhead pressing, the rut is that I know overhead pressing is important and is part of all popular strength routines such as 531 for example, but due to physical and disability reasons I cant overhead press.

So although I'd love to do 531 bbb without overhead press, everywhere I look its very cult like surrounding the overhead press and i cant find any useful 531 bbb routines without it.

So first of all is it detrimental to remove ohp from routines?

Also, due to not finding a routine to fit my needs, ive come up with this plan

Mon
Squat
Curl

Wed
Bench
Row

Fri
Deadlift
Pulldown

Does this hit the whole body?

I’ve done 5/3/1 using squat, row, deadlift and bench as main lifts. No problem whatsoever.

And to become even more heretic, I’ve also replaced both overhead and bench presses with incline press, experiencing great success.

Oh, I almost forgot… During a rather large stint the only pressing I did were the “evil” dips. And, once again, it was all good.

You routine seems fine, but if you like 5/3/1 you can replace presses for rows no problem (even if Wendler doesn’t recommend it).
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
I agree, just pick some other pressing variation that you can do instead of the overhead press.
 

SUOMI-PUKU

Level 5 Valued Member
I think there are a lot of programs that don't incorporate the OHP, and while it is a good full body exercise, you can still see great progress without it. Starting Strength uses the press OR bench press, PTTP uses a press of your choice and often that choice is bench press or floor press, Faleev 5x5 uses a bench press with no OHP option, etc. If I was in your position I would just omit it and do the rest of the program as written, or replace it with a press you can do like dips.
Starting Strength uses Bench and Press. They seem to more strongly favour the Press in intermediate/advanced programming too.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
I'm in a training rut due to being unable to do overhead pressing, the rut is that I know overhead pressing is important and is part of all popular strength routines such as 531 for example, but due to physical and disability reasons I cant overhead press.

So although I'd love to do 531 bbb without overhead press, everywhere I look its very cult like surrounding the overhead press and i cant find any useful 531 bbb routines without it.
There's been a focus on OHP because it was (is) neglected in favor of bench press, which some believe have caused negative effects on the shoulder by "unbalancing" the body, especially when coupled with neglecting training bench press antagonist muscles.
So first of all is it detrimental to remove ohp from routines?
No exercise is "necessary." But if you cannot do an exercise, it is important to look at why and work towards fixing the issue (if possible). I removed OHP around 4 years ago due to limited shoulder mobility causing presses to irritate my back. I fixed the issue, now I can press pain-free. If you cannot "fix the issue" then it is important to look at how to train with those limitations, and a lot of that is goal-dependent. Joe De Franco has put out some fantastic material regarding training and not relying on the press.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
if you cannot do an exercise, it is important to look at why and work towards fixing the issue (if possible). I removed OHP around 4 years ago due to limited shoulder mobility causing presses to irritate my back. I fixed the issue, now I can press pain-free. If you cannot "fix the issue" then it is important to look at how to train with those limitations, and a lot of that is goal-dependent.
+100

Yes yes yes. Unless you have structural issues that are definitely unfixable (and more is indeed fixable than you might think) my two cents is to work around the issues you currently have, while working on fixing those issues. All too often I see people say they can’t do something because it hurts so they train something else, all the while listing the things that hurt. This isn’t medical advice, however I am also becoming a stronger and stronger believer that better movement will address many common issues people list. If you always move around a limitation (whether it’s temporary, fixable or not) you are leaving a weak link in your chain. I suggest at least trying to address what you can. Addressing weak points and mobility issues, etc will only make you stronger in the long run.

To the original question :yes.

An additional thought: if you have a barbell consider landmine presses. I am a strong believer that these, properly done,can help to re-educate the shoulder girdle to do what it’s supposed to do and hopefully alleviate problems. That’s not medical advice, mind you, but I would look into it. I’d be happy to elaborate if asked. I hope some of that is encouraging, Happy training!
 
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