Kettlebell Does anti glycolic training....

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Harald Motz

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Certified Instructor
How are kettlebell swings not Cardio???
@MikeTheBear did a great job to explain what's going on with different kind of activities and intensities in regards to heart adaptations.

In a nutshell you need in order to get optimal heart wall expansion by doing rapid cyclical low intensity (unweighted) movements with little tension in the thorax (no power breathing) and muscles to not hinder blood flow to and from the heart. Running, cycling, nordic skiing seem to be the most favourable to do that.

My guess for A+A work is generally speaking, the intensity of the ballistics is relatively high for the short repeats and there can be and actually is lots of tension. While shaking and breathing for rest in between for recovery and reducing heart rates there should be some stretching of the heart walls.

But the A+A protocols are no means to substitute traditional endurance work. From my experience the whole picture of Alactic Ballistic work + Aerobic endurance work is more than just the sum of both. Each one effects the other one quite positively in a synergistic manner.
 

Steve W.

Level 7 Valued Member
@Mark Kidd, if by antiglycolytic training, you mean short intervals of KB ballistics with relatively generous recovery (what we often refer to as A+A), as far as I know your question has not been studied and the answer is unknown.

However, low intensity cyclical/locomotive aerobic activity (such as following MAF guidelines) can also be considered "antiglycolytic." The effects of this kind of training have been better studied and the effects are better known, as discussed in the thread @Harald Motz linked above.

This is one reason I much prefer the term "A+A" to refer to short intervals of KB ballistics with relatively generous recovery, rather than "antiglycolytic." It's much more specifically descriptive of the training we actually mean. In fact, I'd prefer a term that refers more directly to the parameters of the actual training, instead of the energy system(s) being targeted.

The parameters of the training are known and can be clearly observed (i.e., reps, sets, rest periods, etc.). This is what we know we are doing.

The targeted physiological effects are inferred or hypothetical (based on specific training research and/or general knowledge of human biology) and can not be directly observed under normal training circumstances. This is what we hope is happening.
 
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Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
From what I gathered at Strong Endurance, no, it doesn't. That particular adaptation comes most specifically from steady state cardio.

However there are many forms of anit-glycolytic training (AGT). A+A is one type or sub-set of AGT. Some of the others come closer to stimulating steady state cardio.
 

GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member
However there are many forms of anit-glycolytic training (AGT). A+A is one type or sub-set of AGT. Some of the others come closer to stimulating steady state cardio.
About 1 1/2 weeks ago, on a day I would normally do A+A snatch work, I felt good overall but one shoulder and low back were talking to me, telling me to take it easy. My usual working weight is just about 30% body weight so I grabbed next one down which is almost 21%. That lower weight is enough that I can feel the groove of the movement but easy quite easy to do it. Working with 30% bell, after 5 snatches/15 seconds, I generally need about 1 1/2 minutes to recover heart rate so that highest peak is just inside MAF. I found that with 20% bell, same number/time snatches, I could start next set at considerably higher heart rate to still hit same peak and recovery time needed was more like 30-45 seconds. End result in how I felt was much more like steady LSD cardio. The changes up and down in heart rate were smaller and average heart rate was considerably higher and still within MAF.
 

User 6372

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About 1 1/2 weeks ago, on a day I would normally do A+A snatch work, I felt good overall but one shoulder and low back were talking to me, telling me to take it easy. My usual working weight is just about 30% body weight so I grabbed next one down which is almost 21%. That lower weight is enough that I can feel the groove of the movement but easy quite easy to do it. Working with 30% bell, after 5 snatches/15 seconds, I generally need about 1 1/2 minutes to recover heart rate so that highest peak is just inside MAF. I found that with 20% bell, same number/time snatches, I could start next set at considerably higher heart rate to still hit same peak and recovery time needed was more like 30-45 seconds. End result in how I felt was much more like steady LSD cardio. The changes up and down in heart rate were smaller and average heart rate was considerably higher and still within MAF.
Good to know. I want to try MAF but I need a heartrate monitor that gets out of the way of the bells.
 
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GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member
I have a Polar 60 that has wrist watch read out. If I place it so it butts right up against base of my hand, as far as it will go, and put the face/readout on inside of my wrist, it fits just above contact area of KB. I do mostly use comp bells so that may be a factor as they are pretty big diameter. And my 12 kilo, smallest bell is iron classic style but it has really wide, open handle shape. Before I figured out how to wear the monitor I was just putting a belt of some sort on, over my clothes, and hanging it from there. Almost as easy to grab for a quick peak.
 

The Nail

Level 7 Valued Member
Good to know. I want to try MAF but I need a heartrate monitor that gets out of the way of the bells.
I use a Polar H10 chest strap when I'm tracking my lifting HR, feeding data into my smart phone. Stays put pretty good. When doing my MAF runs, I use the strap plus the Polar M430 watch to monitor my heart rate.
 
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