does it make sense that Alactic + Aerobic would burn more calories?

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
Very interesting topic. Strength, upon closer examination can be very specific to how it is trained. I recall several studies that compared high %RM to low %RM done to failure. The lighter load done to failure equaled the muscle growth of the heavier loading, the heavier loading increased RM by a significant amount, but isometric force was comparable between the two groups.

Is tempting to say "I increased my max loading on exercise X therefore I am stronger" but on some other exercise you might very well have gotten weaker or showed zero improvement.

I have to agree that some forms of strength training have more carryover - when doing my offset weighted pole exercises I nearly doubled my 1arm press AMRAP without doing any pressing. I believe exercises that force the core to activate to attempt the lift, and exercises that improve reflexive shoulder socket integrity/tension have the greatest potential to carry-over, but even these are largely specific.
In some weeks of VWC I was lifting 45-50,000 lbs just snatching, the carryover from hoisting that much tonnage overhead is amazing, my shoulders got bigger and fat melted from below the belly button, which is always the last place to go when ripping down. My weight stayed static but body comp changes were significant, shoulder vascularity was almost popping through my shirt.

Everything felt easier during the VWC process, my low back elasticity and durability increased and my legs felt springy, like I could jump up 10 ft in the air. On top of that my resting heart rate was way lower.

The main problem with the protocol is accumulated fatigue, I would have done it once or twice a week if I wanted to hang with the program for awhile. I have nothing bad to say about it and have zero regrets. It's just too glycolytic for me to do, now I'm getting stronger slowly in the A+A format. No matter how I look at them or do them, snatching in higher volume is the king for me, nothing else comes close.
 

North Coast Miller

More than 2500 posts
In some weeks of VWC I was lifting 45-50,000 lbs just snatching, the carryover from hoisting that much tonnage overhead is amazing, my shoulders got bigger and fat melted from below the belly button, which is always the last place to go when ripping down. My weight stayed static but body comp changes were significant, shoulder vascularity was almost popping through my shirt.

Everything felt easier during the VWC process, my low back elasticity and durability increased and my legs felt springy, like I could jump up 10 ft in the air. On top of that my resting heart rate was way lower.

The main problem with the protocol is accumulated fatigue, I would have done it once or twice a week if I wanted to hang with the program for awhile. I have nothing bad to say about it and have zero regrets. It's just too glycolytic for me to do, now I'm getting stronger slowly in the A+A format. No matter how I look at them or do them, snatching in higher volume is the king for me, nothing else comes close.

I get it - currently am working in a few higher intensity sessions - 1 metcon, 1 HIIT per week, and my strength sessions are cluster format, so still a good bit of volume but with more built in recovery and less intensity per set. My recovery is off the charts for me, I have to time my rest periods to keep from just plowing ahead.

There's volume that triggers a nice response, and volume that is above that just beats you up. Within the effective range there is still room for a lot of loading/volume/intensity tweaks. This conversation sort of crossing over with the "injury question" thread
injury questions
 

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
There's volume that triggers a nice response, and volume that is above that just beats you up.
This is key! Waving volume and static loading work well, waving volume and load works too. It simplifies things and is repeatable indefinitely.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
My workouts consist of Swings, Pull-ups, Push-ups, Leg Raises and Squats. Having read several articles on anti-glycolitic training here, I decided to make all my lifts heavier and drop them below 20 seconds per set, taking long breaks to ensure that I'm not feeling any exertion.

My workouts basically went from 45 minutes to 90 minutes, so I'm working out for longer even though I'm sure I'm doing less actual work.

However, I feel really hungry during my workouts now and I never felt that doing the same workout with slightly lighter lifts in a glycolytic range.

Does this make sense to anyone? Or am I wired funny?
Makes perfect sense to me. Sounds great.

-S-
 
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