Double bodyweight deadlift

jef

I am a student of strength.
Certified Instructor
Now I know it is not much that a bit of training and coaching can't achieve!
Now you know that YOUR training made you achieve this. Yes, anybody can achieve this level, if they put some work into it. You put the work, many didn't.
Strength is not a data point, it is an attitude. (quoting @Rif ).
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Here's 285 lbs., which is just under double bodyweight, for 9 reps.

This is what I call paused touch-and-go format - you put the bar lightly on the ground but you never let the slack out altogether. My competition bodyweight is 145.5 lbs.

This way (paused t-n-g) of deadlifting is definitely _not_ recommended for the new deadlifter, but it's a nice muscle builder for an older, skinny lifter with close to 20 years of deadlifting in the bank because it's a long time under tension.


Enjoy. Next competition, and last one for a while, is coming up on June 23.

-S-
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
I'm just over 6' 1" tall, weigh between 225-230 lbs and consider my strength to be average.
I added deadlifts to my work-outs about 2 years ago and my PR is 300 lbs, about 1 -1/3 body weight.
I would be thrilled to lift 337 (1.5 body weight), I find it hard to believe that 2X body weight is achievable for the average guy.
Interesting. I am about exactly your height and weight, and I too train deadlifts, although not with a real "goal" in mind. I do them at 300lbs because it feels like a good workout at that weight without straining too much. I have up to 330lbs, and I did that weight no problem, but with a sense of "too much strain" to want to do it for reps at that weight.

2X my bodyweight would be 440lbs. That seems like a lot.

My adult bodyweight when young before packing on pounds was 180lbs. Double that (i.e. me without "fat" on my frame) would be a mere 360lbs, which I doubt I'd have difficulty with at the moment given that I can do reps at 330lbs.

At that way of looking at things, 440lbs would be 2.5 times my skinny bodyweight. Still, seems very heavy.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
No, I don't agree. I guess I didn't read the original closely enough. I think a double bodyweight DL is within just about everyone's reach. There are many factors complicating the statistics, e.g., if you weigh 300 lbs. but you're 100 lbs. overweight ... There are lies, damned lies, and statistics. :)

Any male who takes decent care of themselves can learn to deadlift double bodyweight. It's just not all that difficult if you put your mind to accomplishing it. My 2x bw DL is just under 300 lbs. and I'm pulling 340 once or twice a week in training this cycle, pulled 365 last June, and hoping for 370 at a meet next month and more in June. I'll be content when I pull 405 lbs., maybe. And I'm about to turn 63, and I had a severe lumbar spine injury, and have a long-standing t-spine injury, and I'm bow-legged and have near zero cartilage in my knees, I've got arthritis in at least one ankle and the other hip, and both shoulders, and I guess I'll stop there, but you get the idea. It's like what Pavel said that I quoted earlier - a double bw DL is not strong, it's just not weak, and everyone is capable of being not weak. I think we can lower the standards once people hit age 85 or so.

-S-
If you can do all this with all your injuries, I know that I need never think that one day I'll have to stop training! This is very encouraging!
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Thanks. I quote @Rif here - deadlifting, at least for some of us, is easy until it isn't. Or maybe it's deadlifting is easy until it's hard. Or something along those lines. I'm one of those people whose deadlifts look pretty easy right up until I hit a brick wall.

-S-
I'm using the time under tension concept while deadlifting - I hold it up at the top for as long as possible before putting it down. I do the same with my bodyweight exercises - I move up and down but slowly and am thinking more of the duration of the exercise than the reps.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@Kozushi, unless you have a specific purpose for the long holds at the top, I don't recommend you do them.

I recommend you pick up the bar at whatever speed is natural - faster is better than slower, all other things being equal, but all other things must remain equal - you must still stay tight.

Pause briefly at the top, perhaps 1 second to "own" the lockout position, but then continue on with the rest of the movement. If you really want to practice time in the lockout position, I recommend you save that for the final rep of each set.

If you want the time under tension during lifting and lowering to be longer, put more weight on the bar - seriously. Deadlifting purposefully slowly might have a place in a hypertrophy-focused program, and it can certainly have a place to deal with certain deadlift issue. So can pausing at certain places in the movement, and so can doing only parts of the movement. But these are specific things for specific purposes - wait until your pull feels solid to you. In your case, I'd say something like 200 kg. And even then, you don't need fancy stuff, just pull.

-S-
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
@Kozushi, unless you have a specific purpose for the long holds at the top, I don't recommend you do them.

I recommend you pick up the bar at whatever speed is natural - faster is better than slower, all other things being equal, but all other things must remain equal - you must still stay tight.

Pause briefly at the top, perhaps 1 second to "own" the lockout position, but then continue on with the rest of the movement. If you really want to practice time in the lockout position, I recommend you save that for the final rep of each set.

If you want the time under tension during lifting and lowering to be longer, put more weight on the bar - seriously. Deadlifting purposefully slowly might have a place in a hypertrophy-focused program, and it can certainly have a place to deal with certain deadlift issue. So can pausing at certain places in the movement, and so can doing only parts of the movement. But these are specific things for specific purposes - wait until your pull feels solid to you. In your case, I'd say something like 200 kg. And even then, you don't need fancy stuff, just pull.

-S-
Thank you. I'll do that. Thank goodness for your help!

The deadlift is clearly where it's at for maximum full-body strength. I'm getting quite excited about the lift - been doing it for about half a year but not regularly, now I want to get good at it. It's so time efficient, and I am aware of its benefits for judo and for life generally.
 

Rif

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
Thanks. I quote @Rif here - deadlifting, at least for some of us, is easy until it isn't. Or maybe it's deadlifting is easy until it's hard. Or something along those lines. I'm one of those people whose deadlifts look pretty easy right up until I hit a brick wall.

-S-
Steve the quote is 'it's all easy 'til it's heavy' and while I came up with that while trying to train sumo deadlift ( I am a conventional dl'er) it applies to all techniques and form. Forms are easy to do and hold, until the weights get heavy then it's another story
 

Reneta Music

Level 2 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
IMO, if you focus on training the technique the DL will increase by nature. Add the necessary weight to become stronger while training for perfect technique. I am still chasing the 2x BWDL I will achieve it one day. My work schedule is demanding and it is difficult to train consistently.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Steve the quote is 'it's all easy 'til it's heavy' and while I came up with that while trying to train sumo deadlift ( I am a conventional dl'er) it applies to all techniques and form. Forms are easy to do and hold, until the weights get heavy then it's another story
Sumo is _so_ like that for me. Conventional much less so - it's easier to muscle through a really heavy single, and that's why the one meet in which I pulled sumo was my first and only.

-S-
 

Rif

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
Thank you. I'll do that. Thank goodness for your help!

The deadlift is clearly where it's at for maximum full-body strength. I'm getting quite excited about the lift - been doing it for about half a year but not regularly, now I want to get good at it. It's so time efficient, and I am aware of its benefits for judo and for life generally.
Personally I think the barbell squat is superior to the DL for overall full body strength as the eccentric component of the squat is always present as opposed to the DL. and safer to do. Squats transfer well to DL strength but not so much the other way around.

In powerlifting it's relatively common to see lifters train the squat but only pull a little before competition but this never happens the other way around.
 

Kozushi

Level 7 Valued Member
Personally I think the barbell squat is superior to the DL for overall full body strength as the eccentric component of the squat is always present as opposed to the DL. and safer to do. Squats transfer well to DL strength but not so much the other way around.

In powerlifting it's relatively common to see lifters train the squat but only pull a little before competition but this never happens the other way around.
I have a "serious lifter" friend who switched over from deadlifts to squats. I have to say that he was much less rotund before making the switch, however.
 
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Rif

Level 6 Valued Member
Master Certified Instructor
I have a "serious lifter" friend who switched over from deadlifts to squats. I have to say that he was much less rotund before making the switch, however.
Well, there could be a few reasons for that but the squat is know to be king of mass exercises
 

Jeff Roark

Level 3 Valued Member
Personally I think the barbell squat is superior to the DL for overall full body strength as the eccentric component of the squat is always present as opposed to the DL. and safer to do. Squats transfer well to DL strength but not so much the other way around.

In powerlifting it's relatively common to see lifters train the squat but only pull a little before competition but this never happens the other way around.
I agree. The first time I pulled 500+ weighing around 170lbs at that time I was doing a Stu McRobert Brawn style program and I was squatting followed by SLDL's for 1 set only once per week. I had some cousins come in from Ohio and we started messing around with the weights and that night I hit a 485lbs squat, 340lbs bench(T-n-G) and pulled 510lbs.

This definitely stands for me. Seems like the more I deadlift the worse I get at it. Don't know if its mental or that the lift just drains my nerves. Strange enough, I also found this with the Olympic lifts. One per week of both lifts was the best for me.

On the 2xBW note...how many here have managed it double over hand grip no hook? I pulled 370lbs easily just a few weeks ago and tried 380lbs and it slipped out of my hands 3 times. I want that lift! Actually I want 400lbs+ double over hand no hook, but that may take a minute or two.
 

Matts

Level 3 Valued Member
Squatting is def king imo. Everyone should learn it and do a good program of heavy squatting at least once in their lifetime, preferably while young. I also think that's all that's needed- it really teaches the body how to work together and it does trigger the growth hormones. After one gets the benefits of it, I don't think 'heavy' squatting is needed long-term, and can be detrimental to achieving other goals (hogs your energy!). When I squatted heavier, I rarely dl'd, but when I did, it was always going up from the squats, and usually about 100-125lbs above squat weight. DL'ing is a more useful and sustainable exercise for lifetime fitness, but doesn't make the body connect with all parts as much as squatting.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
On the 2xBW note...how many here have managed it double over hand grip no hook? I pulled 370lbs easily just a few weeks ago and tried 380lbs and it slipped out of my hands 3 times. I want that lift! Actually I want 400lbs+ double over hand no hook, but that may take a minute or two.
I can do 315 (more than double bw) that way.

-S-
 

jef

I am a student of strength.
Certified Instructor
On the 2xBW note...how many here have managed it double over hand grip no hook
I did it a few times. Last time was a double two weeks ago. But as I am a light weight, it is only 140kg for me. :)
It is actually my deadlift middle term goal to own the double bowdyweight double overhand deadlift. Still not there, but it is getting better. I lift DOH as much as I can, and switch to alternate grip only when I feel the grip is getting weak and I risk to speed up at the top without locking properly.
 
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