Dynamic vs Static

Discussion in 'Bodyweight' started by Neuro-Bob, May 22, 2018.

  1. Neuro-Bob

    Neuro-Bob Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum

    What would be the difference in strength adaptation when training with a dynamic movement vs a static hold?

    For example: training via one arm pushups for (quality) reps, as opposed to static holding the bottom position of a one arm push-up and simply increasing the TOT?

    I believe a static hold at the bottom is mentioned somewhere in NW, as I’ve used that technique in the past.

    But either way, which kind of goal would be better suited to which method of training? When would it be wise to choose one over the other?
     
  2. Anna C

    Anna C Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum Certified Instructor

    If you search for "slow fibers" on the articles page you'll find the blog articles about using the static (or near static) exercises. The static hold limits the blood flow in the muscles during the work and encourages the hypertrophy of the slow fibers. For most people and applications, it's not the best way to go, and dynamic exercises are better. But they can be useful, especially for sports or applications where you static muscular endurance at a high percentage of 1RM such as wrestling.

    That's my brief understanding of it, anyway... hope that helps.
     
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  3. North Coast Miller

    North Coast Miller Strong, Powerful Member of the Forum


    Yeah, if you have any application where static control is a strong component it really pays to include a bit of that in your training, or if the movement allows, abbreviated ROM in the desired range. I've been experimenting with this and getting some very good if limited results. I have also gotten good results doing iso and yielding iso to increase striking speed both hand and leg.

    For general fitness a full ROM is better, but some research shows a mix of full and isometric can improve size or power output depending on the lift/muscles involved.

    Bodyweight Isometrics for Improved Strength | T Nation
     
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  4. offwidth

    offwidth Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum

    I agree that in some case (goal dependent) one needs to train both. In rock climbing for example there is a term known as 'lock-off' strength. This is the ability to hold oneself in a static position. Imagine doing a pull-up and then holding the top position, whilst you reposition your body, or fiddle with gear, or reach for another hold. Very important in climbing.
     
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  5. Anna C

    Anna C Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum Certified Instructor

    Yes, rock climbing is another excellent example. For this, Pavel recommended the hack squat hold. 30-60 seconds, moving very slowly back and forth through the hardest part of the hack squat movement. Brutal.
     
  6. Neuro-Bob

    Neuro-Bob Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum

    @Anna C thanks for the reference. The “how to build your slow twitch fibers” series was very interesting, and came with some plans for practical application. It seems similar to what you said, though it did include that some people may simply prefer the “burn” from slow twitch training as opposed to heavy weight/low reps. I’m not sure where I fall on that scale.....

    @North Coast Miller i liked that article, thanks for sharing it. Reminds me of a former roommate that was a collegiate gymnast...,even after an injury that put him out for a few months, his withered arm was bigger than mine!

    @offwidth excellent use of the word “whilst.” Very Dickensian. More seriously, that makes sense as a practical application. I love watching things like ninja warrior, and you can always tell who is a climber and who isn’t.....
     
  7. Karen Smith

    Karen Smith Chief SFB Bodyweight Instructor Master Instructor

    They both have there place. At the SFB I teach people to use the Static holds near their sticking points. For example if working the OA/OAOL pushup and as you near the bottom you lose tension and cannot perform the full range of motion, then I would stop just short of that tension loss and hold that position for time. We also teach to start from the bottom up and do the same thing. Beginning relaxed and "zipping up" tension to a spot just before the sticking point. Think of building the movement from top down and from bottoms up until you meet in the middles with one very strong solid movement.
     
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  8. Neuro-Bob

    Neuro-Bob Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum

    This makes perfect sense, thanks!
     
  9. Jak Nieuwenhuis

    Jak Nieuwenhuis Strong Member of the Forum

    choose both. static and dynamic.

    nothing will educate you more about the OAPU and pistol than holding the bottom position.

    when I run NW, I choose 1 or 2 days per week to work ONLY on the top and bottom positions for time..

    doing statics and dynamics in the same day is not preferred.. for me anyway
     
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  10. dododo

    dododo Second Post

    train holds to be good at holds...
    train dynamic to be good at moving under tension...
    train a given thing to be good at that given thing. there is some carry over but don't depend on it
     
  11. Sergej

    Sergej Double-Digit Post Count

    Google johnny grube or wildmantraining.com

    He is a very big proponent of isometrics.and has some very simple,but hard and effective workouts containing them.
     
  12. Sergej

    Sergej Double-Digit Post Count

    How exactly can the hack squat help with climbing?
    As far as i know,climbers recommend pistol squats because you need one leg strength.
     
  13. Anna C

    Anna C Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum Certified Instructor

    Pavel made the recommendation during the Strong Endurance seminar in May, and if I remember correctly, it was about two things: 1) isometric contraction, as you have to hold yourself on the wall (thus the 30-60 sec hold), and 2) using the leg strength specifically in that range of motion where the hip joint is externally rotated AND maximally flexed. I actually remember this from my little bit of climbing last year with my son in Yosemite National Park -- although my legs were relatively strong, I had a hard time reaching my foot WAY up on the wall for a new foothold and then pulling myself up onto it. I think the hack squat hold would have helped address that.
     
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  14. offwidth

    offwidth Strong, Powerful, Explosively Athletic Member of the Forum

    Rock Climbing:
    Pistol Squats, and Wall Squats, and to a certain degree Cossack Squats
     
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