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Other/Mixed Easy Interval Method or Verheul Method?

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

JPCross

Level 6 Valued Member
Has anyone read up on, researched, or tried the Easy Interval Method by Klaas Lok or the Verheul Method as it applies to endurance training? It seems to have some parallels to Pavels approach to strength training in a way, specifically A+A or Q&D style work.

I’ve spent the last 2-3 years building a good aerobic base for endurance events using more of a MAF approach while maintaining a baseline level of strength. However, I was always an explosive athlete (collegiate tennis) and seem to have lost some of that pop or speed over the years despite maintaining good strength and power with lower body, especially hinge, movements.

I’m going to be incorporating this style of endurance work for the next few months to see what happens.
 

John Bye

Level 5 Valued Member
I’ve neither used it nor heard of it, but am interested enough to have ordered the book- so thank you! It sounds like it might be somewhat like the training I did as a mountain bike junior.

Not sure if you might want to post your question in a different forum section- I think this section is only open to those who’ve attended a Strong Endurance seminar and so you might get a better response elsewhere?
 

JPCross

Level 6 Valued Member
I’ve neither used it nor heard of it, but am interested enough to have ordered the book- so thank you! It sounds like it might be somewhat like the training I did as a mountain bike junior.

Not sure if you might want to post your question in a different forum section- I think this section is only open to those who’ve attended a Strong Endurance seminar and so you might get a better response elsewhere?
Thank you for the reply! I’ll post on the main forum but interested in your thoughts after reading the book.
 

Philskies

Level 2 Valued Member
I just found out about this book today and also noticed all the similarities with Pavel's endurance training methods, especially the article about "long rests". I came to this forum to see if anyone else made the same observation and lo and behold, someone has.

It seems the common theme to both methods is to build mitochondria in the full range of muscle fibers (type i, type iia, type iix and everything in between) by maximizing stimulus (through volume at the corresponding intensity) and miminizing fatigue (through long rests).
It just makes so much sense and jives with everything Pavel says about endurance training that I ordered the book right away and I can't wait to try it. I feel like my progress with MAF and slow running only stimulates mitochondrial growth in the slowest twitch fibers and doesn't do much for the faster fibers until the slowest fibers are fatigued which takes too long.
I’m going to be incorporating this style of endurance work for the next few months to see what happens.
@JPCross Did you end up using this style of endurance work, and how did it go?

Not sure if you might want to post your question in a different forum section- I think this section is only open to those who’ve attended a Strong Endurance seminar and so you might get a better response elsewhere?
I never attended the Strong Endurance seminar but I was able to find this thread.
@John Bye How did your experience go with the Easy Interval Method?
 

JPCross

Level 6 Valued Member
@JPCross Did you end up using this style of endurance work, and how did it go?
I've been using this for the majority of my runs; I've backed off running volume and added in some Concept2 rowing for endurance work but as far as running goes, the Easy Interval Method really fits me well.

It's really hard to say with 100% certainty the impact of Easy Interval Method because I started using this approach and also dropped volume overall while adding back rowing work to keep the total endurance training time about the same, but I will say this is what I've noticed over the last few months:

- Less "ploddy" and more efficient during fast paces.

- More "ploddy" at slower paces, likely slightly less efficient because I have been running slow less.

- MUCH more springy; I felt very aerobically fit prior and my heart rates at slower paces stayed low whereas now they seem to be about 5 beats per minute higher, but my faster paces feel much easier and I am running lighter if that makes sense.

- Less beat up in the lower extremities, possibly from less volume.

I feel like I am much more prepared now for everything up to and including a half marathon; I feel less prepared for anything beyond about 90ish minutes than I did prior.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
I like this stuff and have ordered the book a few moments ago.

So far it reminds me of the later training phases of Nils van der Poel:
(Free ebook on his training for a speed skating WR.)

He does his aerobic base building at steady states - but one a bike.
On ice he only trains at race specific speeds in intervals with active rest. And only during winter.

This strict periodization might also be due to speed skating being a winter sport. But he warns against training at slower speeds due to technical alterations.

Edit: I have summarized some of the similarities between this approach and StrongEndurance here.
 
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JPCross

Level 6 Valued Member
I like this stuff and have ordered the book a few moments ago.

So far it reminds me of the later training phases of Nils van der Poel:
(Free ebook on his training for a speed skating WR.)

He does his aerobic base building at steady states - but one a bike.
On ice he only trains at race specific speeds in intervals with active rest. And only during winter.

This strict periodization might also be due to speed skating being a winter sport. But he warns against training at slower speeds due to technical alterations.

Edit: I have summarized some of the similarities between this approach and StrongEndurance here.
Awesome find!

Yes, there is a lot of benefit to running easy. However, if you want to run a sub 90 min half marathon, 6:50/mi pace better feel sustainable, if not easy, and the only way to do that is to train that pace (or faster).
 

offwidth

Level 9 Valued Member
Awesome find!

Yes, there is a lot of benefit to running easy. However, if you want to run a sub 90 min half marathon, 6:50/mi pace better feel sustainable, if not easy, and the only way to do that is to train that pace (or faster).
Nils is the real deal (obviously)
But yeah…. at the end of the day if one wants a fast time then at some point in their training they just gotta go fast. (And hard)
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
Received the book today. I have only skimmed through it so far, but the first thing that struck me was the focus on "reactivity" vs. limit strength. Lok advocates that limit strength is not that important after distances over 800m - but reactivity is - the play between tension and relaxation to move forward.
a) This fits very well the description of tensegrity and elasticity in "The Lost Art of Running"
b) KB ballistics (espc. swings) should be perfect for this. Lok recommends a kind of vertical jump as a strength training exercise, and as we know, swings are a safer and more progressive alternative to, for example, depth jumps.
 

TedDK

Level 4 Valued Member
Nils is the real deal (obviously)
But yeah…. at the end of the day if one wants a fast time then at some point in their training they just gotta go fast. (And hard)
Easy interval method focus alot on intervals in sweetspot/tempo and not as much as many others on real slow/easy/MAF pace.

Im running very little but after the same principles and it works for me.
 

Philskies

Level 2 Valued Member
I just skimmed the book yesterday and did a 30min critical power test this morning using a Stryd power meter. I'm pretty excited to give this a go as I've been bored running slow/MAF all the time, getting very slow results, and getting injured. Hopefully this new way of running will some pep back in my step without the injuries, and make running a lot more fun. I'm also going to apply this easy interval method to my cycling training using the same %FTP/CP formulas and see how it goes. If all goes well, I might even apply it to indoor rowing.
 
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