Exercising one arm has double benefits in rehab

GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member

Exercising one arm has twice the benefits
Date: October 27, 2020
Source: Edith Cowan University


Summary:
New research has revealed that training one arm can improve strength and decrease muscle loss in the other arm -- without even moving it. The findings could help to address the muscle wastage and loss of strength often experienced in an immobilized arm, such as after injury, by using eccentric exercise on the opposing arm.
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Interesting. All my injured football teammates started working out whatever wasn't injured asap after injury/surgery back in the 80's, but not with a focus on the eccentric.
 

GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member
Interesting. All my injured football teammates started working out whatever wasn't injured asap after injury/surgery back in the 80's, but not with a focus on the eccentric.
My impression (not from the article really) is that they are two different issues. Working the immobile side helps the passive side is one thing. Eccentric only work just gives max bang for your energy expenditure but it is a lot easier to get into position to do an eccentric rep by doing a concentric one just prior to.
 

Steve Freides

Staff
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
@GeoffreyLevens, this isn't new news. :) I remember reading about it, I believe in one of Pavel's earlier books, 20-ish years ago. If memory serves, the statistic was a 70% carryover, e.g., if one arm is in a cast and you only exercise it, the arm in the cast will be 70% as strong as the uninjured one. Something like that - forgive me, just going from memory here.

-S-
 

GeoffreyLevens

Level 6 Valued Member
@GeoffreyLevens, this isn't new news. :) I remember reading about it, I believe in one of Pavel's earlier books, 20-ish years ago.
Had a friend clear back in mid 1970's who broke either the lunate of capitate bone (can't remember) in his wrist skateboarding. He could not work with one hand (surfboard mfg) so he brow beat his doctor into putting on a fiberglass cast which was somewhat rare in those days. He went surfing almost daily for the couple months he could not work and just the small amount of "work" his fingers/wrist did being pressed by the water as he paddled and then pushing against his board as he stood up, resulted in near zero atrophy when cast was removed. Of course he had to tack a pad on the deck of his board so he didn't smash through the glass each time he popped up to standing. Everyone including his doctor were amazed. Inadvertent N=1 experiment...
 
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