FMS Correctives

Kettlebelephant

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Hey!
I'm planing to get a FMS-Screening in the near future, but after some research on the internet I start to worry a bit about the application of the correctives. A lot of them seem to require additional equipment, partner work or even machines that you only find in a gym.
A little bit of extra equipment like e.g. 2-3 bands is acceptable, but nothing more.
I don't need to pay 100 bucks to get the assessment followed by a list of exercises that I can't do because I don't go to a gym or have a partner to help me with them.
So to anyone with a bit more knowledge about this, is it possible to get correctives that can be done at home, alone and with minimal equipment?
Thanks in advance,
K-phant
 

jca17

More than 300 posts
I looked for an FMS that had SFG or RKC certifications. All the correctives she gave me were body weight or kettlebell (you may need to get an 8 or 12 kg kettlebell for some types of correctives, but heck, you can always help someone else get started with getups or something when you don't need them any more). See if you can find one with those qualifications. It was great because as part of my rehab, I also got technique coaching for movements I'll be doing long after rehab (halos, one arm swings, TGU, etc)
 

Pavel Macek

More than 2500 posts
Master Certified Instructor
FMS has a extensive toolbox of correctives, so it depends on the experience of the FMS expert. I definitely recommend to go through FMS.
 

Kettlebelephant

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Thanks guys!
Good to hear that there are bodyweight and KB options.

I looked for an FMS that had SFG or RKC certifications. All the correctives she gave me were body weight or kettlebell (you may need to get an 8 or 12 kg kettlebell for some types of correctives, but heck, you can always help someone else get started with getups or something when you don't need them any more). See if you can find one with those qualifications. It was great because as part of my rehab, I also got technique coaching for movements I'll be doing long after rehab (halos, one arm swings, TGU, etc)
I did that too, but couldn't find someone like that in Germany. The only one is a guy who fitness mags like Men's Health etc. call "Germanys leading Kettlebell expert", but he has no known certification (SFG, RKC, IKFF, WKC) and I'm very, very sceptical about people like that.
I've already planned to get a lighter KB for Armbars, so that wouldn't be an issue.

hopefully you don't need any correctives and that's that. If you do, discuss the options with your FMS practitioner.
I hope so :) but I did a self-test yesterday and would end up with a score of 15-17. Sure the score in a supervised test might be different, but at least it showed me that I'm not totally screwed up. However there's room for improvement and so I assume some correctives will be needed.
 

ali

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
@Kettlebelephant, I have done the FMS but in no way whatsoever am I a daily practitioner of it, just a bloke who thinks it is a great system for assessing movement.....you may not need correctives at all.....correctives are just that, they correct things. Well the aim is to correct things with the right and appropriate corrective exercise. The score doesn't really reflect that you may or may not need correctives. A balanced set of 2s for the 7 movements will result in a score of 14 and the green light to continue developing strength. You may well score 14 or higher but made up of imbalanced 2/3, 1/3 or 1/2s, some 1s and some 3s.....in which case you may well need some corrective work. Your score of 15-17, could be ok, maybe not so much! The score doesn't mean much on its own, the individual scoring is more the point. If you have done it yourself, are you able to identify any asymmetries? And any 1s? Yes, always better to get some third party eyes but if you know you are a 1 on a certain movement, or you have a clear asymmetry anywhere, then you will know yourself what you may need to work on it. If you are not sure how to go about resolving any known issue, then it maybe cautionary to back off any strength training with a known problem until it is resolved. And certainly if any movement causes pain. Is your score a 15 or 17? Could be any combination of balanced or imbalanced movements at 1, 2 and 3. See what I mean, need the details of the score, not the score itself. And how come it is 15-17? ie a range? If you are in doubt of a score, score lower. Borderline 3 or 2 is a 2, borderline 2 or 1, is a 1. And what is your lowest score and how, if at all, it impacts your other scores? It is very difficult to assess, clearly, on the scoring alone without the details and crucially without actually seeing how you move. Get some eyes on you if you have concerns.

I'm really not experienced enough at all to know all the many correctives with all the many tools and opportunities that they offer to resolve an issue, you know 'it depends'. Some are variants of the same movement, done with a kb or a fixed machine or bodyweight. The point being is if you have a movement dysfunction and adopt a corrective exercise to resolve that dysfunction and the prescribed exercise works, bank it and move on. It is fixed. Consolidate the pattern. And add strength. Job done. And if it doesn't, choose another, with consultation from your trainer/practitioner. There is no point in doing corrective exercise to fix something that doesn't need fixing....and forgive me, I may be misunderstanding your original question.....so if you see someone using a fancy machine apparatus to fix a shoulder mobility problem, that doesn't mean you need to do the same exercise if you have a shoulder problem. So yes, if stuff needs fixing it needn't involve overly specialised machinery. But some people may well benefit from that approach if deemed to be appropriate and available for them. Equally, a kb, a stick, or the floor may do the same thing, for better or worse.....Hope that may help, or reassure in a small way.
 
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