Kettlebell Focusing on too many exercises at once detrimental?

Opiaswing

Level 5 Valued Member
Hi guys,

I have recently been learning the wonderful variety of kb movements after a period of doing mostly swings and cleans.

Once overhead work was on the agenda, I started working single and double c&j, single and double snatches, all kinds of loaded carries, along with continued swings and cleans.

Unsurprisingly my shoulders have taken a beating and whilst I rehab a twinged rotator cuff, i want to come up with a routine that will allow me sustained training and progression.

With this in mind, I'm considering dropping down to double clean and jerks with swings and squats. Am I covering all bases here, and would. I benefit much from adding in snatches, or would the added volume and shoulder work hinder my progress in the C&j (which 2x48kg is the main goal of my training)

Thanks guys.
 

Ryan T

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
The answer to the title of your post is a resounding “YES”.

Just do C&J. Also remember it’s a ballistic, so you may not need to do much in the way of swinging.

DFS pairs nicely if you feel like your legs need more. Even still, monitor your recovery with the squats and be ready to either go lighter or lower in volume if you’re not recovering.

Just out of curiosity, why do you have a goal to double C&J @ 48 kg? Will it help you with a particular activity or sport? Are you close now?
 

JamesPTA

Level 5 Valued Member
The answer to the title of your post is a resounding “YES”.

Just do C&J. Also remember it’s a ballistic, so you may not need to do much in the way of swinging
I agree!

I’m currently doing a single LCCJ program and I don’t feel the need to add anything else as covers pretty much all the bases. On non-training days, I might add in some crawling and pull-ups but at a very low volume.

If the goal is to get to 2x48kg LCCJ, have that movement be the sole focus.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

I agree with all the above posts.

If one has a goal, one has to keep it in mind and being relatively focused on it. One can add moves as long as it does not get detrimental to the training per se. Indeed, it may alter performance, recovery, create injury, etc...

From an "health" standpoint though, I'd say that it can be interesting to discover different moves, as long as we perform them with good technique. Progression will be slowler, because nothing beats specificity (SAID principle). Nonetheless, it may create some "plasticity" to learn faster, at least to a certain extent.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

JamesPTA

Level 5 Valued Member
@Opiaswing

To expand a little bit more on my response and goals, I basically want to get comfortable with my heavier KB pairs overhead. In about a month, my plan is to start a 12-week program from KB Express Ultra! by @Geoff Neupert, called OLAD 3.2 (One Lift a Day). All doubles, with one day focusing on LCCJ, and the other 2 days are exercises that I believe complement this movement well, FSQ and DSN. An excellent "Olympic Style" program! If you have access to this program, I would recommend that you check it out.
 

watchnerd

Level 6 Valued Member
Hi guys,

I have recently been learning the wonderful variety of kb movements after a period of doing mostly swings and cleans.

Once overhead work was on the agenda, I started working single and double c&j, single and double snatches, all kinds of loaded carries, along with continued swings and cleans.

Why swing if you're cleaning and snatching?

Swing is the stepping stone to cleaning and snatching.

Other than being easier to learn, I'd be hard pressed to think of some benefit* you can get swings that you're not getting from cleans and snatches.

*unless you're just trying to go super heavy and work the lower body harder, but swings are kind of 'meh' compared to barbells for lower body work, anyway
 

Don Fairbanks

SFG II
Certified Instructor
Throw in some mobility/walking easy days, and some bodyweight stuff, carry's, low zone jogs. Think active recovery give the shoulders a rest day.
 

Mirek

Level 6 Valued Member
Well I think the problem is not too much exercise variety but too much volume and/or intensity and not enough recovery,
or, of course, not an ideal technique thereof. Quite a few times in the past I've been doing greater variety of exercises
than you described without any detrimental effects on me.
 

Dayz

Level 6 Valued Member
The problem with doing too many exercises can be that it means you do too much overall volume and don't recover, or, that you end up doing too little volume of the key lifts you want to improve. Or both.

However, if you set your desired volume for your key lift/s, you might find you have some capacity to sprinkle in some variety in a way that will improve the desired lift.

For example, maybe there's a limit to how much overhead volume you can do. Once that is reached, instead of more overhead work, you spend time doing something different that will still benefit your overhead work by making you stronger and bigger, like a small amount of horizontal pressing, or something for triceps hypertrophy.
 
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