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Other/Mixed Good health habits that take no extra time

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
What's the issue? Heels raise up?
No, more just incredibly uncomfortable if I don't have a counterweight.
It is more I have to lean way forward to maintain balance. The whole squat pattern goes out the window when trying to do work in a squat.
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
No, more just incredibly uncomfortable if I don't have a counterweight.
It is more I have to lean way forward to maintain balance. The whole squat pattern goes out the window when trying to do work in a squat.

Time to start front squatting with a barbell to build up that upper back strength to hold your torso upright when in the hole. ;)
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
Time to start front squatting with a barbell to build up that upper back strength to hold your torso upright when in the hole. ;)
Haha, been playing around with front squats lately. But my delicate delts aren't tough enough yet to do them 3x a week so I've been alternating zerchers and front squats.

Also again, I feel like I can sit in the hole with a front squat for quite a while. It is just when trynig to get work done on a laptop that it feels absolutely miserable.
This is just awful: squat working.jpg

Wheras this feels great:
 

Torin

Level 4 Valued Member
It is just when trynig to get work done on a laptop that it feels absolutely miserable.
This is just awful:
FWIW: Your ankles aren't flexed (dorsiflexed) enough to balance your center of gravity over your feet. Which is to say, your shins are way too vertical for that foot placement.

 
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Adachi

Level 6 Valued Member
Since time is short I want to make sure all the parts of being healthy that take no time are on point in my life, alongside strength/cardio/mobility training.

For instance:
- Healthy diet
- Good sleep hygiene
- Practice good posture throughout the day.
- Wearing barefoot/no shoes instead of regular ones to strengthen feet.
- Learning to breathe well, slow nasal breathing during the day.
- Standing desk for work (or changing position/moving often ot both!)
- Treadmill desk (I haven’t tried/got one yet but would like one in future).

All things that take no extra time than unhealthy habits but can help us on our health/longevity goals.

Does anyone care to share any more?
Count your blessings.

I find that I'm much closer to peace and contentment when I take stock.

the effects on me have not been insignificant.
 

silveraw

Level 7 Valued Member
You're ankles aren't flexed (dorsiflexed) enough to balance your center of gravity over your feet. Your shins are way too vertical for that foot placement.

Huh, I suppose that is why I feel it in my shins so much when I sit in the squat without load.

I thought I had avoided dealing with this issue when I gave up on pistols... Now here it is again.

Also thanks for the info.
 

Chris Hall

Level 4 Valued Member
Most of the things I would have said have already been mentioned. The thing I would add is get your light exposure optimised:
- go outdoors whenever practical (even what we consider bright indoor light is less bright than a dull cloudy day, so get outside even when it is overcast)
- get sunlight as soon as possible after waking up. (That’s outdoor light again). Keeps your body clock set correctly.
- when you have to be inside in the day time, keep things bright as much as possible
- Make your sleeping place as dark as possible.
- Make your room lighting as dim as practical in the hour or two before bed.

Our bodies are built for a clear distinction between day and night (A very dark overcast day is about 1000 times brighter than a night with a full moon). Unfortunately our indoor spaces tend to have a light level too dim for our body clocks to register as ’day’ and too bright to register as ‘night’.

Get your body clock sorted and a huge range of health factors start working better.
 

oab

Level 5 Valued Member
Learning to mentally relax as you go about doing things outside of practice sessions in relaxing the body and mind so the mind slows down and stills. In stillness lies calm. Being mentally relaxed means learning to live calm rather than with a still mind. A still mind in daily living would mean going around in something like a trance so you extract the calm component and cultivate that. It involves relaxation, as you all know here, relaxation is the opposite of tension. Relaxation of the mind involves that too - it is effortless. These ideas from Dr Ainslie Meares' meditation method.
 

Kev

Level 6 Valued Member
Most of the things I would have said have already been mentioned. The thing I would add is get your light exposure optimised:
- go outdoors whenever practical (even what we consider bright indoor light is less bright than a dull cloudy day, so get outside even when it is overcast)
- get sunlight as soon as possible after waking up. (That’s outdoor light again). Keeps your body clock set correctly.
- when you have to be inside in the day time, keep things bright as much as possible
- Make your sleeping place as dark as possible.
- Make your room lighting as dim as practical in the hour or two before bed.

Our bodies are built for a clear distinction between day and night (A very dark overcast day is about 1000 times brighter than a night with a full moon). Unfortunately our indoor spaces tend to have a light level too dim for our body clocks to register as ’day’ and too bright to register as ‘night’.

Get your body clock sorted and a huge range of health factors start working better.
Yup. Respect the circadian rhythm. Unless you are Inuit or a Reindeer. They evolved to not have one.
 

DannyHoj

Level 2 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
  • Bringing your own, well tasting coffee at work, rather than consuming trash from a machine that stimulates anger.
  • Find more or less legitimate reasons not to attend long, pointless meetings.
  • Bring heavy backpacks and incorporate some fun, easy climbing when going for hikes.
100%
 

iron&flint

Level 6 Valued Member
Cold shower every day.
I was all in on cold exposure (including the cold showers, which I still do occasionally) until I read The Book on Heat by Brad Pilon.

It’s generally accepted that saunas are beneficial to health but the published research (all referenced in Pilon’s book) on both acute exposure to heat and general acclimatisation to higher ambient temperatures is really compelling. He doesn’t exactly throw the cold baby out with the bathwater - there are benefits to both approaches - but let’s just say I’m now rugging up more than I was.
 

ClaudeR

Level 6 Valued Member
Remember that proper sauna has a cold shock element which is just as much part of it than the heat… evidence on which part (or the combination of both) is the beneficial one is scarce

You haven’t lived until you’ve had vodka-infused sauna in the finnish north followed by a dip in a finnish lake (preferably with the management of the company you expect to do business with)

I’m sure @Antti will knowingly nod to this :cool:
 

Antti

Level 9 Valued Member
Remember that proper sauna has a cold shock element which is just as much part of it than the heat… evidence on which part (or the combination of both) is the beneficial one is scarce

You haven’t lived until you’ve had vodka-infused sauna in the finnish north followed by a dip in a finnish lake (preferably with the management of the company you expect to do business with)

I’m sure @Antti will knowingly nod to this :cool:

I agree. The combination of the contrasting temperatures really elevate the experience. The vodka and some good company as well.

As a recently resurfaced funny aside, the contrast method was recommended by Finnish doctors 100 years ago for calming the nerves and avoiding masturbation. No mention of vodka there in that context.

I understand the modern science is very much behind it as well, perhaps for other reasons, though.
 
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