Gray Cook Books

conor78

More than 500 posts
Certified Instructor
Having had great advice in a thread regarding flexibility I recently bought Flexible Steel, Supple Leopard and two Gray Cook books, Athletic body in balance and Movement. I have read Flexible Steel, and quickly read Supple Leopard(which was excellent) The Body in Balance book looks really good however I think I'll need all of generous teacher's holiday to get through Movement. Has anyone been reading Gray's work and applying it to their practice?
 

ali

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
What is great about Gray's work is the complexity of distilling it all down to movement is movement. Whatever is your thing, someone else's thing, a new thing or many old things it is all fundamentally the same thing......movement. Studying and learning from the fms gives you a reference, a lens, to look at all movement however simple or complex it may appear, walking to sprinting, mobility to gymnastics......that doesn't mean it gives you the ability to do them obviously. And Gray and @Brett Jones and other members affiliated to fms are fantastic educators. I have some of their DVD educational secrets series and they are excellent additions. I hold them fully responsible for fuelling my obsessive tendencies. From just a bloke's perspective their ability to communicate their ideas to a bloke on the street and to a trained physio or chiropractor simultaneously is remarkable......no talking up or down to their audience or readers.
Whatever you buy, read, watch will certainly be time well spent.
 

Lee Hunt

More than 300 posts
Certified Instructor
I've just started doing the assessments in body in balance. I knew my flexibility wasn't my strongest qualities, however I've already improved my score with a retest which is great! I still have some work to go, but I'm enjoying the focus it's giving me and the direct feedback I get. I'm also interested to hear how others have got on with these books...
 

conor78

More than 500 posts
Certified Instructor
That's super Lee. I'm getting some coaching from an SFG and mobility in the hips and hamstrings are something I need to work on. I never really had an interest in mobility but I can see the appeal now as I push towards 40. I read balance quite quickly and I got the same sensation as I got when reading S and S. The writing touches a chord. I must run some of the assessments and see where my baseline is..I dread to think.. @ali you're right about the movement paradigm. I'm probably a bit like yourself...obsessive tendencies...after exhausting Pavel's work I now have Gray Cook's back catalogue to look forward to...
 

wespom9

More than 500 posts
Certified Instructor
FMS practices basically changed the entire way I coach clients. I've delved pretty deep into it, as well as all the other books you mentioned and countless others. Not a day goes by where I learn something new about the system. I can pick up Movement, read 4 pages and learn things I missed the first 7 times I read it. It's that good. @ali hit the nail on the head - at the core, the way our body moves, the competency it currently has, drives everything else.

W From just a bloke's perspective their ability to communicate their ideas to a bloke on the street and to a trained physio or chiropractor simultaneously is remarkable......no talking up or down to their audience or readers.
Whatever you buy, read, watch will certainly be time well spent.
extremely well said
 
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