Great examples of heavy kettlebell hardstyle snatches

Reuben B

Level 1 Valued Member
Deeper knee angle increases quadricep contribution, and allows more time for force to be applied along a more vertical trajectory. Good things for heavy lifting as evidence by the natural change when that is the goal.
I am not really seeing a downside to using more muscle mass to move heavier weight through greater joint angles when the purpose is GPP? And obviously snatch specific performance goes up.
If we are seeing a big change in technique as weight increases, form may be deteriorating, or maybe we are getting away with inefficient form at light weights?
This assumes the goal of GPP or snatching heavy weights. Deliberately modified technique for a specific goal, think greater hinge in RDL vs Conventional DL, would be a different topic.
 

DuncanGB

Level 6 Valued Member
My rough "know it when I see it" rule (which is still open to some interpretation): "Are you snatching the bell, or is the bell snatching you?"
This.
For me it's "know it when I feel it" - especially so in the down cast.

The great thing about A+A snatch sessions is that you can really hone technique, correcting bad reps, always aiming for those feel-good repeats. "Did I pull the bell down to fully re-load the hinge nice and smoothly?" or "Did the bell drop me into a weaker (dare I say "squatty") hinge?"

That said, I'm snatching 32kg - not that heavy relative to my bodyweight of around 80kg - so what do I know?
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
For the record, I would not consider this a squatty snatch. It is perfectly executed all things considered.

Thanks @Os Aponte ! Likewise... your snatches are excellent. In all likelihood, we are only a few degrees apart in what we're talking about, if even that. Words don't always do justice to actual movement. The heavy snatch is an awesome exercise.
 

Steve W.

Level 6 Valued Member
My rough "know it when I see it" rule (which is still open to some interpretation): "Are you snatching the bell, or is the bell snatching you?"
This.
For me it's "know it when I feel it"
Yes -- When I was writing my post I actually went back and forth between "know it when I see it" and "know it when I feel it."

I'm going to go back and edit it to "know it when I see (or feel) it."
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Ha, you just beat me to it, @Alexander Halford !

I was going to post Sven's snatches, and also Tim Almond's -- so interesting to note the differences in timing. Both snatching 44kg.

(To be clear, I think they're both outstanding examples and find no fault with either!)

I admire Sven's sprinty style.

I also admire the way Tim loads the top position, and uses the timing so precisely.


 

DuncanGB

Level 6 Valued Member
I admire Sven's sprinty style.
I also admire the way Tim loads the top position, and uses the timing so precisely.
Bang on point as usual in observation as well as expression

Sven Riegert's Pavel quote: “The one-arm snatch is the Tsar of kettlebell lifts, fluid and viscous” - such a thought-provoking choice of adjective is "viscous" in the context of kb ballistics...

Tim Almond's gainz over his 10 months' snatching the 40 - just wow... has me intrigued by his "volume brackets":
"2,400kg at the start through to 12,000kg towards the end" - assuming A+A-style 5-rep repeats, that's from 6x 5L - 5R through to 30x, or 12 through 60 repeats

Seems like it's just a relentless accumulation of volume adding 6 repeats a month - is it that simple though?
"Today I went back to the low volume practice in bracket 1 with the 44kg bell (2,640kg at 44)" - perhaps it is... maybe?
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Tim Almond's gainz over his 10 months' snatching the 40 - just wow... has me intrigued by his "volume brackets":
"2,400kg at the start through to 12,000kg towards the end" - assuming A+A-style 5-rep repeats, that's from 6x 5L - 5R through to 30x, or 12 through 60 repeats

Seems like it's just a relentless accumulation of volume adding 6 repeats a month - is it that simple though?
"Today I went back to the low volume practice in bracket 1 with the 44kg bell (2,640kg at 44)" - perhaps it is... maybe?

We have a member on @Al Ciampa's forum (@Snowman) that has experimented with a more hypertrophy-inducing format, primarily some repeats towards the end of the session of 10 snatches per repeat instead of 5, for a little burn and growth stimulus. Seemed to work well for him.
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 7 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
We have a member on @Al Ciampa's forum (@Snowman) that has experimented with a more hypertrophy-inducing format, primarily some repeats towards the end of the session of 10 snatches per repeat instead of 5, for a little burn and growth stimulus. Seemed to work well for him.

Now you got me thinking (again) I'll PM you
 

Snowman

Level 6 Valued Member
We have a member on @Al Ciampa's forum (@Snowman) that has experimented with a more hypertrophy-inducing format, primarily some repeats towards the end of the session of 10 snatches per repeat instead of 5, for a little burn and growth stimulus. Seemed to work well for him.
I originally did a write up of what I had been experimenting with here on SF on this thread. I've played around with it a little more since then and learned more, though certainly nothing ground-breaking. A high volume of heavy snatches will be enough by itself to generate hypertrophy for a lot of folks, and for the rest of us, the amount of tweaking needed to put on some mass isn't too major. Smaller that I originally thought, actually. The results aren't as dramatic as a dedicated hypertrophy program, but I think most folks could expect 1-2 pounds/week of lean mass if they play their cards right. If anyone has questions that aren't answered in the old thread, feel free to revive it.

I don't want to derail this thread, so to bring it back on track, let me just say that heavy snatches rock (y). And I agree that it's ok for there to be small differences in technique when comparing snatching 30%BW vs 50% BW. What you're ultimately trying to do doesn't change, but the movement just has to evolve a little bit.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
Anna,
Thank you.
I discovered that I was looking up by watching the videos myself. It's not something I am consciously doing and for now I am not "arguing" with it.

Yes, it's always informative to get the video/external view to superimpose on the experience/internal view. Video has been one of my greatest training tools. It facilitates self-coaching, which helps me in two ways: coaching experience, and improving my own practice.

As for where the eyes go for the snatch, I tried a few light snatches with the eye gaze up and it's an interesting effect. Seems to facilitate "up" movement. With squats, some coaches will say "look up to go up" and some will say the opposite, so I suppose it could be similar. It's a neat idea for snatches and yet another detail to experiment with... Thanks.
 

Steve W.

Level 6 Valued Member
As for where the eyes go for the snatch, I tried a few light snatches with the eye gaze up and it's an interesting effect. Seems to facilitate "up" movement. With squats, some coaches will say "look up to go up" and some will say the opposite, so I suppose it could be similar. It's a neat idea for snatches and yet another detail to experiment with... Thanks
I've actually been doing a lot of snatches with my eyes closed. Especially if I don't feel like I'm in a good groove at the beginning of a set, closing my eyes seems to help by shutting out visual proprioceptive input and letting me focus internally on timing and positioning.

Or maybe that's not the reason, but it usually has the immediate effect of getting me back in a good groove.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
I've actually been doing a lot of snatches with my eyes closed. Especially if I don't feel like I'm in a good groove at the beginning of a set, closing my eyes seems to help by shutting out visual proprioceptive input and letting me focus internally on timing and positioning.

Or maybe that's not the reason, but it usually has the immediate effect of getting me back in a good groove.

I was going to mention that too! Eyes closed (when safe and already very competent at the movement, of course) is an awesome way to get new internal feedback and learn new things. I've used this with swings, get-ups, presses, snatches, squats, and deadlifts.
 
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