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Other/Mixed Grip training program

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

TobyC

Level 1 Valued Member
Hi all, I’ve recently gotten two Gods of Grip trainers, the 100 and 150 pound. I can just close the 150 pound, so am going to be using the 100 pound as my “working weight”, just have a quick question about programming. I’m planning on doing RoP style ladders 3 times a week with heavy light and medium days. This is in addition to my normal training sessions, KB and bodyweight based with some gymnastics rings thrown in. Has anyone used these before? Any feedback or recommendations?
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
I’ve recently gotten two Gods of Grip trainers, the 100 and 150 pound. ... Has anyone used these before? Any feedback or recommendations?
Different Kind of Grip Strength

Below is information on the...

The 3 Types of Grip and the 8 Ways to Train Them


Types of Grip Training and When to Use Them

Grip training goes well beyond squeezing grippers or stress balls. After all, there’s more than one kind of grip strength:
  • The Crush Grip is the grip between your fingers and your palm—the one you use for shaking hands and crumpling beer cans.
  • The Pinch Grip is the grip between your fingers and your thumb. This can be further subcategorized into individual fingers + thumb grip.
  • The Support Grip is the ability to maintain a hold on something for a while—think pull ups or long and productive shopping trips.
The type of grip training you do depends completely on its applicability to what you want to accomplish.
 

Hrungnir

Level 6 Valued Member
Make sure you’re doing some expansion movements too, either with broccoli bands or in a bucket of rice.
 

Kenny Croxdale

Level 7 Valued Member
It seems that this article recommends only isometric grip training.
Isometric Grip Strength Training

1) Pinch Grip Strength Training is a short term Isometric; lasting around 8 seconds; Rock Climing, opening jar lids, etc.

2) Holding Grip Strength Trainng. It Endurance Grip Strength such as holding on to a Pullup Bar for time, Farmers Walk, etc.

Holding Strength Training is important for Deadlifting.

Crushing Grip Strength

This involves a Concentric Component. As the article stated, It is used ""...for shaking hands and crumpling beer cans."
 

Rúben Sousa

Level 4 Valued Member
Hi all, I’ve recently gotten two Gods of Grip trainers, the 100 and 150 pound. I can just close the 150 pound, so am going to be using the 100 pound as my “working weight”, just have a quick question about programming.
If your goal is to close the grippers, I would suggest to train 1 day a week. Just simple stuff. 2 warm up sets, 3/4 work sets to a heavy single. Just use a gripper that you can close. Don't be like me trying to crush my max all the time. It doesn't work that way. Do not push your self too hard.
No holds, negatives or silly high reps. It will only slow you down. Trust me. I learnt the hard way. If you can do 5/6 reps with the gripper move to the next one. Set a goal. A big goal like closing a 2. 5 or 3. It will keep you motivated.

If you are more interested in getting overall grip strength, they are better ways

1 - Holds on the Saxon Bar, I prefer double hand than one handed lifts. The heavier the best.
2 - Wrist plate curls will put you bending frying pans same way you can roll a newspaper.
3 - Pronation like armwrestlers do. This part is very neglected and it is very effective for elbow health and strength.
4 - Double overhand deadlift hold close to your grip failing. But again not to failure. Just close.
5 - Finger work like 2 finger pullup/deadlift hold.

Yes you can do also grippers but you have to choose one thing at the time because they interfer with each other. If you blow yourself in the Saxon, forget about grippers next or vice versa. The numbers of reps time etc are not that important. Don't do too much. Don't do too little.
Just take one day of your training and in the end do some grip work.

Regarding your training and considering that you only have kettlebells at home (because if you had a barbell I would put all my trust in the Powerlifts + OHP)
Why do you want to press more? If your goal is overall strength and health, I would do kettlebell complexes, you can get a hell out of strong just simplying play with light moderate weights, do some walks, and have fun doing bodyweight high tension movements (Janda sit ups, Front levers in the rings, one arm push ups, etc).

Kind regards from Portugal
 

Uphill Endeavors

Level 1 Valued Member
Train the nine categories of grip and you should be good. Frequency is key and work up slowly. Per Adam T. Glass:


  1. Crush grip, such as squeezing a torsion spring gripper
  2. Pinch grip, both dynamic and static. There are 4 different pinch positions commonly trained
  3. Support grip, such as holding on to the pull up bar, barbell or a rope. Commonly described when the hand is mostly closed and the load is spread between the fingers and palm. We can also include the different styles of finger lifting here
  4. Open hand grip, such as fatbars and thick handled objects.
  5. Levering, typically using the wrist along with a closed hand position.
  6. Bending, a combination of holding strength with the hands and stabilization at the wrist while moving the upper body.
  7. Tearing motions, using the fingers, thumb and wrist often in circular motions such as card tearing and shredding phone books.
  8. Extension of the fingers and hand, primarily as opposition to work in flexion.
  9. Wrist movements including flexion/extension and ulnar/radial deviation motions. Most people get adequate flexion and extension training with their pressing, pulls, and curl motions. Wrist deviation motions can be a useful addition for those who do not work with levering or neutral grip apparatuses
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
Train the nine categories of grip and you should be good. Frequency is key and work up slowly. Per Adam T. Glass:


  1. Crush grip, such as squeezing a torsion spring gripper
  2. Pinch grip, both dynamic and static. There are 4 different pinch positions commonly trained
  3. Support grip, such as holding on to the pull up bar, barbell or a rope. Commonly described when the hand is mostly closed and the load is spread between the fingers and palm. We can also include the different styles of finger lifting here
  4. Open hand grip, such as fatbars and thick handled objects.
  5. Levering, typically using the wrist along with a closed hand position.
  6. Bending, a combination of holding strength with the hands and stabilization at the wrist while moving the upper body.
  7. Tearing motions, using the fingers, thumb and wrist often in circular motions such as card tearing and shredding phone books.
  8. Extension of the fingers and hand, primarily as opposition to work in flexion.
  9. Wrist movements including flexion/extension and ulnar/radial deviation motions. Most people get adequate flexion and extension training with their pressing, pulls, and curl motions. Wrist deviation motions can be a useful addition for those who do not work with levering or neutral grip apparatuses

I almost thing there needs to be a 10th category holding power tools.

Chainsaws and even pressure washers (if used long enough) can cause me to get grip fatigue, even though you're not holding them that tight.
 
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