GTG pushups and pull ups questions

the hansenator

Level 6 Valued Member
I have about a month where I'll be working from home so I thought it would be a good time to give greasing the groove a try but there's a few things I'd like to ask about.

I remember seeing sets of about 1/2 max reps recommended, is that about right?

Can you gtg with pushups and pullups at the same time?

Is there a minimum or maximum number of sets recommended?

Would it be less effective to include slight variations, like change the hand position or include the occasional static hold?

In regular workouts, I assume I should minimize upper body pushing and pulling while doing this?

Thanks!
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

@the hansenator
Maybe I am a bit weird, but this is what I usually do with good results. When I am tired with one of the two moves, I stop for the day for both of them.

As always, the danger with GTG is recovery, so here you have to be 'double careful'.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

kennycro@@aol.com

Level 6 Valued Member
I have about a month where I'll be working from home so I thought it would be a good time to give greasing the groove a try but there's a few things I'd like to ask about.
Neural and Technique Development

The Craig Marker article that nate posted provides some good information GTG.

GTG innervates and coordinates muscle fiber so that they learn to fire together at the same time. Doing so allows you to produce more force (Strength and Power, dependent on the training load percentage).

Neural and Technique is optimally developed with load that are...

1) Around 85% plus of a 1 Repetition Max with Traditional Strength Exercises; Squats, Bench Press, Deadlift, Pullups, etc.

Loads of 70% are effective to a degree in the development of Neural Training and Technique Development; but not as optimal as load that are closer to a 1 Repetition Max used with 85% plus.

That because the neural firing sequence and technique is different with load in the 70% vs the 85% range.

However, the lower training percentage does allow some carry over and minimizing muscle fatigue.

2) Power is achieved with...

a) 48 to 62% loading in Traditional Strength Training Movements.

b) 70 - 80% of 1 Repetition Olympic Lift (Power) Movements.

Can you gtg with pushups and pullups at the same time?
Yes

One of the benefits of alternating opposing muscle groups, it allows you to produce more force in each movement.

Is there a minimum or maximum number of sets recommended?
Sets

The number of Set is primarily determined by muscle fatigue.

Once muscle fatigue set in, the muscle firing sequence and technique are changed. That basically means you are performing a different exercise when you continue in a fatigued state.

The number or Repetition is kept low, 1-5 per set. Around 1 - 2 set is usually going to provide a greater training effect.

Would it be less effective to include slight variations, like change the hand position or include the occasional static hold?
Changing Hand Positions

Varying hand positions amounts to performing a different exercise. It's similar to going from a Flat Bench Press to an Incline Bench Press.

Varying exercises is one of the keys to increasing strength and increasing muscle mass.

However, it not effective for developing the neural firing sequence and technique in a specific movement.

In regular workouts, I assume I should minimize upper body pushing and pulling while doing this?
The Workout Batting Order

The key to GTG, Neural-Technique, Development is to...

1) Perform it first in your workout, when you are fresh.

2) As Marker's article basically stated, once muscle fatigue set in, Stop.

Continuing in a fatigued elicits a different training effect.

3) One you have performed you GTG training movements, you can move on to some other upper pushing and pulling movement.

As per Pet...

When I am tired with one of the two moves, I stop for the day for both of them.

As always, the danger with GTG is recovery, so here you have to be 'double careful'.
 
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the hansenator

Level 6 Valued Member
Thanks for the replies.

I think that answers a lot of my questions:

So I guess when I start getting tired, that's it for the day.

Don't vary the exercise because then it would be a different exercise.

In regular workouts, it's ok to still push and pull but maybe use different exercises?
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

From my personal practice, I use GTG with what I want, regardless this already belongs to my main routine. It does not seem to bother recovery because I do not practice if tired.

That being said, I think the most optimal way is to GTG with things that does not belong to the main routine. For instance, you perform OVH press during the routine, you use GTG with any kind of push ups (assuming we are not talking about HSPU of course)

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

Masangkay

Level 1 Valued Member
Good discussion here. Here is my $0.02:

Can you gtg with pushups and pullups at the same time? Depends on other training volume. If nothing else is being actively trained, you absolutely could do both.

Is there a minimum or maximum number of sets recommended? The minimum (IMO) is one set a day, done 3+ days a week. The maximum depends on other training volume and your training history. Instead of thinking about "maximum sets," consider instead "minimum sets to make consistent progress." If I can do ONE set of 50% of my max push up reps 3x a week, and continually improve my max push up test, there is no sense in increasing the volume. If you slow down or stall out, then you can play with frequency and daily sets to mobilize your progress. Remember the purpose of GTG is to stay as fresh as possible.

Would it be less effective to include slight variations, like change the hand position or include the occasional static hold? This one again is "it depends" but it matters less than training volume. Let your goals dictate this one. If I'm striving to increase max reps of regular old push ups, >50% of the time I should be doing regular old push ups. But a set here and there of knuckle push ups, different hand widths, or static holds won't impede progress.

In regular workouts, I assume I should minimize upper body pushing and pulling while doing this? Again, the goal informs the answer here. You can easily create a program that uses nothing but GTG, or you can add GTG into your overall training in a manner that supports your overall goals and doesn't impede your recovery.

I'll end the post with how I personally incorporate GTG. I like to do at least a couple sets each day of cossack squats, thoracic bridges and hard style planks. A set of each back to back takes about 1.5 minutes and helps me feel nice & loose and mobile throughout the day and going into main workout sessions. The hardstyle plank allows me to reinforce practice of "the brace" without load which I can then apply to virtually any grind style lift. GTG'ing in this manner keeps me in a physical "ready state" all day long AND reduces the need for lengthy warm-ups for main sessions. This is training economy at its best.
 
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