Health Routine

dobie

Double-Digit Post Count
Question- walking for health and recovery, how long? Some reference long walks, how long, what speed? Stu McGill advocates 3 30 minute walks everyday. 90 total everyday seems like quite a bit.
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
Question- walking for health and recovery, how long? Some reference long walks, how long, what speed? Stu McGill advocates 3 30 minute walks everyday. 90 total everyday seems like quite a bit.
Like most things, I think it's an individual matter. If you don't walk very much at all, starting by just doing a couple 15 minute walks would be a fine start. Then, as you realize and feel how therapeutic it is, you may decide to take new routes, see new sites and extend the time. I think the main benefits of walking are to get fresh air, aid in circulation, enjoy the ease of movement and find pleasure in moving freely outdoors.
 

Jim Lauerman

More than 300 posts
I think the main benefits of walking are to get fresh air, aid in circulation, enjoy the ease of movement and find pleasure in moving freely outdoors.
And in my case, keeping the Miniature Schnauzer happy.

Seriously, I walk her 3-4 times a day in the park next door to our house. I don’t know who enjoys it more, me or the Schnauzer. It’s a major part of my fitness regimen.
 

kiwipete

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Hello StrongFirst!

I'm writing in the bodyweight forum for the first time to inquire about a routine for someone looking to step away from the barbell for a bit. I've trained with the barbell for as long as I can recall and after quite some time, I've felt the toll of this. As a powerlifting enthusiast, most of my training has centered around this but I seek a change that will help "reset" my body and allow overall systematic recovery to occur. I'm seeking ideas to create a callisthenic based program similar to that of yoga or tai chi to accomplish this. The main goals of this program are to
1) Deload the spine and joints
2) Restore harmony of movement
3) Enhance flow and energy of the body
$) Strengthen joints and create balance and postural optimization

Now, I am not seeking a strength program to increase my pushup reps or to raise my pistol squat repetitions. This program is for basic health of movement. I have become rather tight and stiff in my powerlifting training, and I wish to create something to keep me moving well for years to come, that I can use in between vicious strength cycles to revive my beaten down body. I have a few ideas. I very much like Max Shank's 5 minutes of Flow and will probably use that is a starting point. After that, I am thinking moves like Bridges, Renegade Lunges and Yoga Pushups. Does anyone have something along these lines they can recommend or a program or resources for similar situations? I'm thinking Pavel's "Super Joints" might be a good resource to look into as well. Please share any experience or knowledge on the subject! Thank you!
Hi Philippe!

I'm curious to know - once you've reset your body and achieved system recovery...what is it you'd like to do with your body/ time/ energy?

I use OS resets - even though I move plenty - as a form of meditation and checking in with my body each day to make sure I train / practise at a level appropriate for my energy that day (auto-regulation?)

I think breathing practises are a must. I use box breathing, been around since the dawn of man.

In a nut shell. 5-10 min a day, exhale for 5 seconds, hold 5 seconds, inhale 5 seconds, hold 5 seconds
 

Philippe Geoffrion

More than 500 posts
Hi Philippe!

I'm curious to know - once you've reset your body and achieved system recovery...what is it you'd like to do with your body/ time/ energy?

I use OS resets - even though I move plenty - as a form of meditation and checking in with my body each day to make sure I train / practise at a level appropriate for my energy that day (auto-regulation?)

I think breathing practises are a must. I use box breathing, been around since the dawn of man.

In a nut shell. 5-10 min a day, exhale for 5 seconds, hold 5 seconds, inhale 5 seconds, hold 5 seconds
I'd really just like to be efficient at being able to optimally perform daily tasks. For me, my work is very labor inducing, and I haul and move a lot of heavy boxes, pallets and the likes all day. I hope to expand my zone of comfort so on my days off, other physical labor, such as yardwork or tasks of the like at home, don't seem just like more work. So I wish to expand my capacity for work and also maintain a physically active lifestyle. And I also like powerlifting...however, it's a hobby to me and not a profession. I like to push myself and compete, but I do not wish to give it my all. For I think in doing so, I'd sacrifice too much, including my health and physical well being.
 

kiwipete

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I'd really just like to be efficient at being able to optimally perform daily tasks. For me, my work is very labor inducing, and I haul and move a lot of heavy boxes, pallets and the likes all day. I hope to expand my zone of comfort so on my days off, other physical labor, such as yardwork or tasks of the like at home, don't seem just like more work. So I wish to expand my capacity for work and also maintain a physically active lifestyle. And I also like powerlifting...however, it's a hobby to me and not a profession. I like to push myself and compete, but I do not wish to give it my all. For I think in doing so, I'd sacrifice too much, including my health and physical well being.
Cool! I think the ability to have greater energy ties in with paying attention to and experiment with nutrition, sleep and stress management.

I think those things are easily overlooked by people wanting to get more energy in their life... I know I overlooked them until more recent times.
 

guardian7

More than 500 posts
And in my case, keeping the Miniature Schnauzer happy.

Seriously, I walk her 3-4 times a day in the park next door to our house. I don’t know who enjoys it more, me or the Schnauzer. It’s a major part of my fitness regimen.
This is actually a very scientific approach called habit stacking. Link an activity you already do with the target activity. For me it is things like a set of pushups before leaving my office for lunch. A set of band pullaparts before leaving the office for home etc.
James Clear has a good new book on this. Many of us here enjoy our weight training but the mobility work may be something we neglect and this is a good strategy.
 

North Coast Miller

More than 2500 posts
Hello StrongFirst!

I'm writing in the bodyweight forum for the first time to inquire about a routine for someone looking to step away from the barbell for a bit. I've trained with the barbell for as long as I can recall and after quite some time, I've felt the toll of this. As a powerlifting enthusiast, most of my training has centered around this but I seek a change that will help "reset" my body and allow overall systematic recovery to occur. I'm seeking ideas to create a callisthenic based program similar to that of yoga or tai chi to accomplish this. The main goals of this program are to
1) Deload the spine and joints
2) Restore harmony of movement
3) Enhance flow and energy of the body
$) Strengthen joints and create balance and postural optimization

Now, I am not seeking a strength program to increase my pushup reps or to raise my pistol squat repetitions. This program is for basic health of movement. I have become rather tight and stiff in my powerlifting training, and I wish to create something to keep me moving well for years to come, that I can use in between vicious strength cycles to revive my beaten down body. I have a few ideas. I very much like Max Shank's 5 minutes of Flow and will probably use that is a starting point. After that, I am thinking moves like Bridges, Renegade Lunges and Yoga Pushups. Does anyone have something along these lines they can recommend or a program or resources for similar situations? I'm thinking Pavel's "Super Joints" might be a good resource to look into as well. Please share any experience or knowledge on the subject! Thank you!

Amosov's daily 1000 sounds like a good fit. To this I would add jumping rope, jogging, rucking.

Amosov 1000 Moves

 

watchnerd

Triple-Digit Post Count
After seeing so much praise for OS, I gave some of the resets and crawling a try. The result was a big “MEH.” I don’t get it. Maybe daily yoga covers it, but when I tried OS I wasn’t practicing. I did find rocking and crawling helpful when I tweaked my back last week with a DL.
After hearing all the praise, I'm about halfway through the Reset book and most of the stuff about breathing and the movements seem pretty much the same as what is practiced in yoga.

The emphasis on crawling was definitely different, though, but the rest seemed familiar to anyone who has practiced yoga.

Am I missing something?
 

Anna C

More than 5000 posts
Elite Certified Instructor
After hearing all the praise, I'm about halfway through the Reset book and most of the stuff about breathing and the movements seem pretty much the same as what is practiced in yoga.

The emphasis on crawling was definitely different, though, but the rest seemed familiar to anyone who has practiced yoga.

Am I missing something?
IMO with about 10 yrs intermediate-ish-level yoga and some experience with OS, I would say it's quite different. I never did rolls, rocking, or crawling in yoga, and while yoga is often about elongating the body in some plane, OS doesn't really try to do that at all.

What did you find to be the same about them?
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
IMO with about 10 yrs intermediate-ish-level yoga and some experience with OS, I would say it's quite different. I never did rolls, rocking, or crawling in yoga, and while yoga is often about elongating the body in some plane, OS doesn't really try to do that at all.

What did you find to be the same about them?
I agree. Yoga, at least any I have experienced personally or through family and friends who are instructors, is quite a bit different from OS.
 

watchnerd

Triple-Digit Post Count
IMO with about 10 yrs intermediate-ish-level yoga and some experience with OS, I would say it's quite different. I never did rolls, rocking, or crawling in yoga, and while yoga is often about elongating the body in some plane, OS doesn't really try to do that at all.

What did you find to be the same about them?
Actually, in my yoga classes we do rocking and rolling. But not crawling.

All the other moves, and the breathing emphasis, look pretty yoga-esque to me.

It probably depends a lot on the particular school of yoga, too. Most of the stuff I do is the opposite of Bikram -- more Yin and Iyengar.
 

Ricky01

Triple-Digit Post Count
I am not a yogi , but have dabbled - so no where near an authority on the subject. I am however a level two OS coach and trainer of their methods.

OS uses developmental movement patterns to restore movement and build reflexive strength.

I am not saying that Yoga does not have similarities and does not build these qualities, but to my knowledge yoga does for use developmental movement patterns as it's foundation.

Richard
 
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