Honest Effort

Dekapon

Level 3 Valued Member
Ummmm...no! If I could hit those numbers with sand I'd be a superhero. 400lbs of sand would be about the size of metal trash can. I do need to pick up some chain, but that's not cheap.
...
I don't know exactly what it is about sandbags, but everything feels heavier with them.
I always assume everyone else is superhero strong...

I see. It looks really heavy and has a nice thud-sound when you drop them on the floor. Like in MMA-training when they do squats with two people on their back.

Bags like these are up to 135kg, the one's you're using doesn't look that much smaller, a bit longer and narrower. Are you sure you're not just being humble? :cool:
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
I always assume everyone else is superhero strong...

I see. It looks really heavy and has a nice thud-sound when you drop them on the floor. Like in MMA-training when they do squats with two people on their back.

Bags like these are up to 135kg, the one's you're using doesn't look that much smaller, a bit longer and narrower. Are you sure you're not just being humble? :cool:
The bags I use would look like his lunch bag, I could climb in the bag he's hauling with my 90lb sack and still have a few pounds to spare.

I plan to run out of weight, but realistically that 220 gonna own me for a long time. I need to get to a gym with racks and see how that translates.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller ,

First off, congratulations for your physique ! This is a excellent and very impressive achievement being both that strong and ripped ! I'd like to get the same hehe, even if I am only 29 yeas old !

I am very "flat-chested" (do not know if this work makes sens in English ?) and looks almost "skinny fat" regarding the abdominals, despite all my physical activities ahah (62kg for 1,83m ; 136 lbs for 6,00)

I saw you modified a little your training strategy. Then, what is the goal ? Do you simply want to get more variety or are you looking for something special ?

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
@pet',
My current goal is multifaceted, I am doing the slow crawl to improve across the range of physique, strength, higher intensity and casual endurance. I don't have the time to devote to LSD endurance, so I'm working around that for now. Most of my training is modified HIT/DeLorme/Thib. I'm familiar enough with some of the volume accumulation strategies, but I respond a lot better to intensity of capacity.

I realize this theoretically slows progress in any single attribute, but probably factors out over time as long as one isn't training to peak - which I'm not.

Another thing becoming more important to me, is just trying different approaches. I intend at some point in the next year or so to begin doing some personal training, and there are some strategies I am not personally familiar with, and many that I never implemented systematically.

I need to correct this so when I plot a course for someone else I have a much better idea of how it fits with their goals. I don't want to be cookie cutter in my approach. As a trainer I want to look like I walk the walk, and am also driven to stay fit for my kids, who are only 11.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller ,

I understand.

Assuming both your performance and physique, I guess you are doing an excellent job !

You probably already know, but Ivan Ivanof does very interesting things with a Bulgarian bag. He is a big proponent of highly functional patterns. I never mixed Bulgarian bag training with modified HIT/DeLorme/Thib strategies thoug. Nonetheless, when I trained with it (most of the time, simply by using a timer for on / off periods), I got good results in terms of GPP.

Old time strongman Sieg Klein may also be "worthy" for someone after both strength and hypertrophy:
Sig Klein’s Beginner Workout
Did you already try something similar ?

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller ,

I understand.

Assuming both your performance and physique, I guess you are doing an excellent job !

You probably already know, but Ivan Ivanof does very interesting things with a Bulgarian bag. He is a big proponent of highly functional patterns. I never mixed Bulgarian bag training with modified HIT/DeLorme/Thib strategies thoug. Nonetheless, when I trained with it (most of the time, simply by using a timer for on / off periods), I got good results in terms of GPP.

Old time strongman Sieg Klein may also be "worthy" for someone after both strength and hypertrophy:
Sig Klein’s Beginner Workout
Did you already try something similar ?

Kind regards,

Pet'
I was introduced to some of the Bulgarian sandbag variations when S Maxwell started training them. I wouldn't mind getting one but are a bit pricey. Some of them can be done with my commercial sandbags, and would be even easier if the bags were loaded with chain to keep the weight up and profile down.

I don't try to use those kinds of patterns with a HIT format, they are all done for time and to generate HR response with a bit of muscular activation to keep metabolism high between resistance sessions. When I use the bags for strength it is an entirely different set of lifts that have more in common with free weights.

Ever since I started on the "Hobo bundle" experiment, no matter what I'm using for resistance I have tried to get at least one upper body lift per session where the load is away from the center of gravity and the arms do not move in an extension/retraction format - this type of motion is not all that common day to day despite being virtually 100% of most resistance work under the desire for maximum ROM.

When I first noticed this, I started to apply Filipino martial arts inspired movement angles to my resistance work where possible - also inspired by FMA when using heavier weapons the elbow stays bent and movement is at the shoulder and torso (some of this can also bee seen in Ivanof use of Bulgarian bag, though I use it with slow resistance format).

All of these principles agree with each other, and I've noticed a big improvement in blue collar strength application. It also had a very positive effect on my upper pecs and lats/traps - the muscles directly supporting/powering these angular movements as opposed to extension/retraction work.

The one thing that is beginning to really gnaw at me is my lack of plyo/agility footwork. Aside from square and circular footwork to complement kickboxing/MA, I have never systematically included any of this in my training. But it is a no-brainer to include in pretty much everyone's programming once they get past a base level of activity, modified to match their abilities of course. So why am I not doing it?

After consulting with my trainer it is decided to introduce some of this soon. With my current format, the two middle days that are now for metcons are the floating part of my work, not so much variety days, to use for other attributes.


Sig Klein basic format is spot-on in my opinion. (y)
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller ,

Currently, I try to create some kind of mix between different goals:
- General physical preparation. Then, I look for multi factor training, without any kind of specialization.
- I also try to use patterns which are useful for my boxing.

At the moment, I extensively use mace work, by focusing on explosiveness. Focusing on power generation using reduced weights create - IMO - a relatively conditioning-oriented training if on reduces the rest to the bare minimum. For isntance, I use plenty of moves, such as "Barbarian squats", several "mill" moves, "spear throw", C&J, etc... They also do a create job regarding joint mobility.

It seems I am more agile and explosive during the boxing session.

Considering the footwork, I dedicate a while to it during each training. When I do shadow-boxing, I use a rubber band for the upper body, and another one tied at knee level. That way, I have a slight resistance, but this does not diminish move quality. Usually, I do 3 rounds that way, with a "fight intensity".

Contrary to you, this training makes me lean, but does not give me your kind of "washboard" abs and massive upper body ;)

My raw (and near maximal) strength is secured with OAOL PU, heavy weighted pull ups (40kg), loaded pistols (up to 20kg) and OA swings, 1,5x DL. Like you, I enjoy adding some "core training" to the whole mix, just because I like it hehe

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller

Yesterday evening, during the boxing sessin, I thought about you during several exercises. We often perform them though.

The first one is about footwork:
- two feet parallel, shoulder width. Basically, you are simply standing (so not a boxing stance)
- then you "tap" as fast as you can with the ball of your feet.
- then you do some kind of "cross" while taping : the left foot goes forward and on the left, while the right foot goes backward on the right. Once you reached the desired distance between the two feet, while keeping taping, you make your feet closer (they eventually parallel, as in the first step). Then you do the other side of the cross (right foot forward on the right and left foot backward on the left). Then you repeat.

With this exercise, you have to avoid all torso torsion. The faster you go, the harder it is. You can do it with a timer for instance. This is tough for the calves but makes the legs quite "toned" as you learn to use the rebound.

If footwork interests you, depending on you boxing style, you can get training methods by watching Vasyl Lomachenko's training. Ali, Sugar Ray Leonard are extremly interesting as well.

Anderson Silva is also fantastic in terms of feet timing (when in relation to the oponent's moves). Max Holloway, Tony Fergusson, Anthony Pettis, Jose Aldo are also nice.

Recently, you talked about the kettlebel "hot potatoe" exercise to work on your lats. This leads me to the 2nd exercise:
You stand straigth, feet with shoulder width. Then, you lift the left leg, without hip / torsion rotation. Basically, as if you wanted to do a front split. You also have to maintain a 90° angle between your foot and your shine bone. The more you lift the leg, the more you have to make an effort to maintain a vertical and straigth torso. It works well glutes and balance too. For additional resistance, you can use a ankle weight or a resistance band.

I hope it can interest you.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
@pet'
I'm looking more into some of the footwork drills the hockey folks do off ice - short sprints/ a handful of rapid steps fore and aft or side to side with sudden reversals. Have been playing around with these and they really get the HR up there. Also feeling a considerable pump in the legs that is somewhat surprising.

Not really plyo although could probably be trained that way - I plan on using them as intervals.

Although I'm thinking "things are going so well help me screw it up", I am real happy with my current progress and routine - am not overtraining and am slowly but surely increasing strength and size while maintaining my stamina - why make changes if progress is still happening?

On the other hand I believe the agility drills will complement lower body strength work and fill gaps in my overall training.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller

Yes you are right. As long as your method works for you and fits your goals, then why would you change it ;)

Working on plyo moves with intervals is perfectly possible. For instance the "cross tapping" I mentioned earlier. We often do some kind of supersets:
- maximum of cross during 40s
- easy shadow boxing during 40s

I guess this is perfectly doable with plenty of other exercises, as long as they remain explosive and are based, at least to a certain extent, on change of direction.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

WhatWouldHulkDo

Level 6 Valued Member
I tend to feel my fastest / most agile when I have some basic regiment of sprints and jumping. I used treadmill intervals and burpees (focused on a big jump) in the winter, just once a week each, and felt like my volleyball mobility went way up.

My $0.02.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
Simplifying some of my workout tools, using sandbags with the original Hobo pole and slightly modified patterns - still hitting the target. I am always looking at ways to make these more accessible to others without the need for specialized gear and this approach is probably as close as its liable to come aside from tying a KB to a pole - a $10 dowel and a few feet of rope on top of standard commercial fitness sandbag.

These might be tougher than the offset loaded pole versions, though a bit less precise when tweaking resistance. As such, are perfect tool for HIT strategy, though could easily be used with more of a SF volume approach.

The larger diameter dowel is brutal on the grip. With all of these varieties, a great deal of local and core tension is developed at the upward limit ROM.

This is the mod'd version hobo Flag:


and personal form check using sandbags for Sissy Squats and Hobo Paddle with 70lb sandbag. While the load on the squats is lower than my hips by quite a bit, loading them up still makes it considerably tougher to do these. I cannot balance with the load any higher, although I have seen some folks do these on a platform and stay more upright, knees lower than feet. Have also seen people use a much reduced ROM and the weight held higher, basically stopping the lift prior to unbalancing, and this is probably the best way forward.

Looking at the video I really need to focus more on pausing at the top of the lift with the Paddles. Pretty much zero pause in evidence but not for want of trying! These are some tough a$$ exercise movements and the command just wasn't being answered.


 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
And here's what the working portion of today's metcon looks like, this is 1/10 of the session, 90 seconds of work, 60 seconds of rest (roughly) hitting about 80% max HR by the end of the work period.

 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
Hacking specificity.

As an update, did a three day canoe trip, involving a fair amount of paddling into the wind fully loaded, and solo paddling a 15 ft 2 person canoe under variety of conditions.

I have to say the paddle exercises I have been doing nailed the movement pattern almost perfectly. I felt like I could have gone at it hard all day, at no point was I fatigued and felt zero soreness afterward. The first day back had that exercise in the plan, was a few reps off my usual but otherwise felt great.

In the past I have been much stronger overall and did not deal half as well with this movement pattern for prolonged periods.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

In the past I have been much stronger overall and did not deal half as well with this movement pattern for prolonged periods.
Is it because you are more "conditioning" oriented nowadays than you were before ? Or is it due to the type of very complex moves you are now doing ?

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

masa

Level 9 Valued Member
Nice job on the paddling. BTW, I bought recently a new item for the summer medieval festivities. Fleur de lis dagger. It fits to my costume well. IMG_20190602_123430.jpg
 

North Coast Miller

Level 7 Valued Member
Hello,


Is it because you are more "conditioning" oriented nowadays than you were before ? Or is it due to the type of very complex moves you are now doing ?

Kind regards,

Pet'
I'd say definitely the movement patterns. Specifically using the partially fixed elbow joint, triceps engaged with pulling movements and biceps engaged with pushing.

Paddling perfectly demonstrates both principles in action, and how a lot of day-to-day applications have little in common with many mainstream exercise movements.
 
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