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Honest Effort

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Reading “Relaxing into Stretch” right now and came across this
View attachment 15343.
There is surprising little literature re this, but yeah - studies that used a range of angles demonstrated greatest strength for using a stretched position.

Even from an isotonic standpoint, would you expect to get stronger doing repetitions using the bottom 1/3 of a squat ROM or the top 1/3. We normally think of this as just mechanically disadvantaged but is also at the longest length. Ultimately this region defines the functional limit of your strength for most movements.

I wonder about activities like rows however, where the last bit of contraction also equals the toughest part of the ROM and the longest moment arm. Wouldn't it make sense that if you had the most strength at the toughest part of the movement, you'd have better dynamic strength through the entire range? You can take this further using the squat analogy - would you get stronger doing only the last 1/3 of a pull up or only the first 1/3?

Not sure I want to test that just yet, but even though it violates the "longer muscle length" rule, it makes a lot of sense...
 
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Benjamin Renaud

Level 7 Valued Member
Great video about your iso board and method. I also noticed you're into sharpening knives and stuff. I love to sharpen all kinds of tools. From my woodworking tools to my knives. I'll look more into your videos when I have more time.
 

Bret S.

Level 8 Valued Member
All holds done 10 seconds full on, 20 cycles rapid relax/ 30 - 50% on, 20 seconds rest.

4 intervals
So this sequence you do 4 times with 20 seconds rest between each one, then do the running in place before moving to the next exercise? It's a few minutes total work for each exercise performed?
Are you doing the HIIT work after 4 sequences of each exercise to flush lactic acid?
How often are you hitting body parts? How is your recovery? Are you cycling volume?

Sorry for all the questions, trying to understand how it works. Reading the works of Maxick and Checkley what you're doing falls in line conceptually with both I think. Checkley is big on lengthening muscle for more power etc, also on advanced muscle control, recruiting every muscle to it's full potential.
 
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North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
So this sequence you do 4 times with 20 seconds rest between each one, then do the running in place before moving to the next exercise?

Sorry for all the questions, trying to understand how it works.

That's it. 4 cycles Iso, 2 cycles HIIT immediately following - these are actually intended to flush inorganic phosphate from alactic pathway and generate lactic acid/deplete glucose to mimic isotonic exercise. This (for me esp with torn meniscus and on/off heel spur pain) is also to improve aerobic capacity. It is probably the biggest single advantage to iso, being able to insert HIIT and get a solid aerobic improvement at the same time as resistance training, and the two complement each other. It would kill me to even attempt this with any form of isotonic exercise that used a challenging load.

The timing is not iron bound. I set the timer for 90 seconds after the 2nd HIIT interval to set up for the next hold, but sometimes I have to take a breather or the next hold requires me to change how the straps are run etc and I need extra time, I just pause the timer for as long as it takes and restart.

So far I haven't done a "de-load". That will most likely simply be the elimination of the 20 pulse reps following the 10 second hold or better yet do a week or two of sandbag circuits. For now it is full steam ahead, this is still an experiment and was planning on running as is till Feb...

The entire program is Mon, Wed, Fri, pickup next week where it left off. So every two weeks I hit each "Day" 3 times. That's it.
 

Bret S.

Level 8 Valued Member
That's it. 4 cycles Iso, 2 cycles HIIT immediately following - these are actually intended to flush inorganic phosphate from alactic pathway and generate lactic acid/deplete glucose to mimic isotonic exercise. This (for me esp with torn meniscus and on/off heel spur pain) is also to improve aerobic capacity. It is probably the biggest single advantage to iso, being able to insert HIIT and get a solid aerobic improvement at the same time as resistance training, and the two complement each other. It would kill me to even attempt this with any form of isotonic exercise that used a challenging load.

The timing is not iron bound. I set the timer for 90 seconds after the 2nd HIIT interval to set up for the next hold, but sometimes I have to take a breather or the next hold requires me to change how the straps are run etc and I need extra time, I just pause the timer for as long as it takes and restart.

So far I haven't done a "de-load". That will most likely simply be the elimination of the 20 pulse reps following the 10 second hold or better yet do a week or two of sandbag circuits. For now it is full steam ahead, this is still an experiment and was planning on running as is till Feb...

The entire program is Mon, Wed, Fri, pickup next week where it left off. So every two weeks I hit each "Day" 3 times. That's it.
Very interesting, thanks for the details! I'm definitely interested to hear what happens with the program when you finish it. Have some ideas on the shoulder, Monday I'll get with you on the details and would love to hear your feedback on it.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello @North Coast Miller

All this is extremely interesting !

I'd have a question. As far as aerobic capacity is concerned, how does ISO + HIIT compare to traditional LISS ?

Thanks !

Kind regards,

Pet'
I'm not qualified to say, honestly.

From my POV, unless you have as a goal for the application of LISS such as marathon or other fairly long duration aerobic challenge, HIIT is probably a better choice for GPP, and especially as we become older.

It produces almost all the same benefits plus does a better job of improving/maintaining glucose metabolism. It is FAR easier on the joints and requires a fraction of time.

Many of the outcomes from LISS that I had thought HIIT could not induce actually are triggered by HIIT. L Kravtiz U of NewMexico has a ton of research on this - increased stroke volume, capillary and motochondrial density, reduced HR and BP. It would be fantasy to think you could run a marathon only using HIIT for aerobic capacity, but for a 5-10 mile run, or most sports, it will do very well, and it plays better with strength and power training.

I'm also biased, between my knee, ankle, and increasingly my lower back I am physically a poor match with LISS. Am also constantly short on time. For me its a no-brainer, if it weren't for HIIT I wouldn't be getting any meaningful aerobic training aside from a 5 minute warmup.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Finally dialed in row and ohp with a bar. To do OHP I had to NOT lean forward or back. That lean is what was stressing the heck out the origin of upper pec at collarbone. To do the row without killing my lower back I had to hinge deep enough that it bottomed out, almost an L-sit with slight backward lean, takes a lot of the load off the erectors, bar touching about three inches beneath my bent knee, hands wide.

3minutes jumprope warmup
- Squat
- OHP press
- hamstring curl
- Barbell row
- Leg Raises
- Triceps extension
All holds done 10 seconds full on, 10 seconds rapid relax/ 30 - 50% on, 20 seconds off, 4 intervals followed by two "max effort" sprint-in-place HIIT 12 on 30 off.
 

Bret S.

Level 8 Valued Member
It would be fantasy to think you could run a marathon only using HIIT for aerobic capacity, but for a 5-10 mile run, or most sports, it will do very well, and it plays better with strength and power training.
Agree, my aerobic capacity far outstrips the wheels, after an hour running they start to wobble, the most I've gone recently is 90 mins. Running can only be prepared for by running, a bike or other methods won't work.
My shoulder woes are simply an injury from pulling a dog leash and ripping on stabilizers. No need to PM you on the shoulder I think, the plan is to implement some iso holds on it at different angles in the template you describe, keeping volume/time low at first.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Agree, my aerobic capacity far outstrips the wheels, after an hour running they start to wobble, the most I've gone recently is 90 mins. Running can only be prepared for by running, a bike or other methods won't work.
Yep. A few years back I had some time before picking the kids up so I ran around the local reservoir to equal a 5k. My time wasn't terrible, but my feet were absolutely burning. That was the same Summer I swam underwater 25yards on a single breath without a dive, the first time swimming underwater any distance in about 40 years. To run better, you must run.


My shoulder woes are simply an injury from pulling a dog leash and ripping on stabilizers. No need to PM you on the shoulder I think, the plan is to implement some iso holds on it at different angles in the template you describe, keeping volume/time low at first.
Sounds like a plan. I've used it rehabbing by approaching the angles that most irritate and slowly ramping up to a near max exertion. If I can't go that hard I'll shift the angle to where I can, or if that isn't possible the angle at which I can exert the most force. Slow ramp with a longish hold, slowly let off. Repeat a few times every day.

For rehab, anything at or above 70% - which isn't really all that hard of a contraction for folks who regularly exercise.

I've had nagging Golfer's elbow for a few years now, comes and goes. Had to quickly arrest the dog (male Golden Retriever about 80lbs) when he lunged for another dog on a walk, immediately felt an ice-cold burn in my elbow right at the medial epicondyle. Could just barely do hammer curls, but absolutely no internal rotation of the hand. This was right about the time I began the Iso block - not gonna push it but it feels 100% now without doing any targeted therapy.
 

Bret S.

Level 8 Valued Member
For rehab, anything at or above 70% - which isn't really all that hard of a contraction for folks who regularly exercise.

I've had nagging Golfer's elbow for a few years now, comes and goes. Had to quickly arrest the dog (male Golden Retriever about 80lbs) when he lunged for another dog on a walk, immediately felt an ice-cold burn in my elbow right at the medial epicondyle. Could just barely do hammer curls, but absolutely no internal rotation of the hand. This was right about the time I began the Iso block - not gonna push it but it feels 100% now without doing any targeted therapy.
I have a heavy green band I can use, it will work well from a high, medium or low anchor point. My gut tells me this is exactly what's needed to get the muscles back to condition.

My dog incident is the opposite, he was attacked by a full grown male GS and I instinctively jerked him away where I could pick him up. Mine's a GS also and was about 5 mos old when it happened, he weighed 55 lbs at the time. When I jerked there was an audible ripping sound, pain was intense and growing. Iced it down and got it somewhat settled, now I'm still dealing with the aftermath. I hurt it again making a jerking movement when a hole in the pavement threw my Valkyrie to the right while riding down an alley, then again when doing concrete demo.. It's a very bad place for a problem but it's steadily getting stronger now.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
I have a heavy green band I can use, it will work well from a high, medium or low anchor point. My gut tells me this is exactly what's needed to get the muscles back to condition.

My dog incident is the opposite, he was attacked by a full grown male GS and I instinctively jerked him away where I could pick him up. Mine's a GS also and was about 5 mos old when it happened, he weighed 55 lbs at the time. When I jerked there was an audible ripping sound, pain was intense and growing. Iced it down and got it somewhat settled, now I'm still dealing with the aftermath. I hurt it again making a jerking movement when a hole in the pavement threw my Valkyrie to the right while riding down an alley, then again when doing concrete demo.. It's a very bad place for a problem but it's steadily getting stronger now.
Like knees, shoulders can take a long time to heal. At some point I'd include a non elastic canvas or rope option to use as well, it'll give you 100% control over tension force and rate of contraction.
 

Bret S.

Level 8 Valued Member
Like knees, shoulders can take a long time to heal. At some point I'd include a non elastic canvas or rope option to use as well, it'll give you 100% control over tension force and rate of contraction.
Good idea, baby steps I suppose.. it's getting better for sure, today I was able to knock out some Navy Seal burpees, will monitor the aftermath. The mace is feeling very good, all geared toward better shoulder function.
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Good idea, baby steps I suppose.. it's getting better for sure, today I was able to knock out some Navy Seal burpees, will monitor the aftermath. The mace is feeling very good, all geared toward better shoulder function.
Slow and easy with small challenges. You know the drill :l
 

North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
3minutes jumprope warmup
- Squat
- OHP press
- hamstring curl
- Row
- Leg Raises
- Triceps extension
All holds done 10 seconds full on, 10 seconds rapid relax/ 30 - 50% on, 20 seconds off, 4 intervals followed by two "max effort" sprint-in-place HIIT 12 on 30 off.

Weighed in right at 200lbs. Kind of incredible really. In ten weeks I've put on about 1.5lbs of fat to 5.5 lbs muscle from my start point of 193, at a guess.
 
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