Hypermobility

miraculish

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I have a diagnosis of benign hypermobility syndrome that has become much less benign over the past two years. I was a bit anxious starting S&S because I was afraid that a ballistic move like the swing would dislocate something, but no injuries so far - except when I took a couple weeks off, during which I hyperextended my ankle and subluxed my hip while sleeping. No more time off! My body doesn't know how to hold itself together without being constantly reminded.

Anyone else?
 

Shahaf Levin

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
My body doesn't know how to hold itself together without being constantly reminded.
If you read Original Strength books you'll see they regard hypermobility as a lack of stability problem, FMS as well (at least to some extent) explain instability as a 'clueless' system. Babies are great example for this.

Seems that your personal experience goes along with these respected systems
 

rickyw

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Some people are congenitally hypermobile because their tissues are genetically more elastic or lax. It is beyond just having neurologic stability issues or poor movement patterns (though shahaf makes a good point). The best example of this I have seen in my office is ehler danlos syndrome, but you have to consider other things like Marfans syndrome and other connective tissue diseases. If you are truly subluxing a joint as stable as the hip in your sleep then you may consider seeing a doctor.
 

miraculish

Double-Digit Post Count
Some people are congenitally hypermobile because their tissues are genetically more elastic or lax. It is beyond just having neurologic stability issues or poor movement patterns (though shahaf makes a good point). The best example of this I have seen in my office is ehler danlos syndrome, but you have to consider other things like Marfans syndrome and other connective tissue diseases. If you are truly subluxing a joint as stable as the hip in your sleep then you may consider seeing a doctor.
Honestly, it's most likely Ehlers-Danlos (I have no markers for Marfan's). And yeah, I have one hip that subluxes easily and a shoulder that I have to be careful of (the worst day ever a couple years ago, I woke up having subluxed the shoulder and *both* hips).
I'm tight through my hamstrings though because that's the point my body uses to stabilize my hips, and the GPs I've seen use...I forget the name of the scale...basically how far beyond your toes you can reach as a "do you get to see a specialist" hurdle. My GP only allowed for the benign hypermobility diagnosis when I could show her how far out of the joint I could get my hip - which is incredibly painful and unhealthy, so instead of fighting for a potentially more appropriate diagnosis, I've worked on getting stronger in ways that are healthy for my joints and not too hard on the cardiac system.
Because when you can't do much about stretchy tendons, you got to have muscles that can take over to some degree if you have longterm plans that involve staying out of a wheelchair.
 
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