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Other/Mixed Ido Portal

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)
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He is very skilled! I will never forget when he played ”touch butt in the park” with McGregor! :D
 

Adam R Mundorf

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Yeah, I've heard he charges a thousand dollars for a month of online training. Also, he has the right to "fire" you if you're not meeting the standards for progress. It's also required to train 4 to 6 hours a day.

It is worth noting that Steve Maxwell said Ido was gonna change his philosophy as he gets older. Lo and behold Ido posted on Instagram that as he ages he's eliminating the one armed tricks and other joint heavy moves. Also, I'm not sure if taller people could perform like him. Ido is 5 foot 5.

He is very skilled! I will never forget when he played ”touch butt in the park” with McGregor! :D

The worst was when Ido was bashing vegans and then Conor got beaten by a vegan.
 

Oscar

Level 7 Valued Member
For these guys that look amazing, I always wonder if they are that successful because of what they do or how they look. Klokov is another example. Not saying that what they do is not good, just wondering if they'd be as successful if they didn't look as good.

(I'm aware Klokov is a world champion. I'm just questioning his media success nowadays with those crossfit things)
 

IcyROM

Level 2 Valued Member
It is worth noting that Steve Maxwell said Ido was gonna change his philosophy as he gets older. Lo and behold Ido posted on Instagram that as he ages he's eliminating the one armed tricks and other joint heavy moves.

Are you referring to this post?

If so, how do you know he's referring to OAHS and joint heavy things?

Also, I'm not sure if taller people could perform like him. Ido is 5 foot 5.
The head teacher for his Israel academy (Roye) is 6'3" and does many things I have never seen Ido be able to do.
 

Adam R Mundorf

Level 6 Valued Member

IcyROM

Level 2 Valued Member
I'm pretty sure this is the post I based the comment off of. I did jump the gun with the specifics though. http://www.instagram.com/p/BXXj_49hSJN/?taken-by=portal.ido

Thank you for the post. It does not seem he's saying he does them less because of his age. But maybe he continues to discover other things to work on and refine and what he has accomplished before he maintains.

Yeah, that dude is truly a beast. I just wonder if he's an oddity or not.

I guess that's what happens when you train with Ido's method for 4-6 hours daily, for 7 years. When he started, Roye was not that impressive or strong. I could do everything he could. Now? He is way past anyone I've seen before! Hard work pays off just as much as good genetics I think.
 

Adam R Mundorf

Level 6 Valued Member
I guess that's what happens when you train with Ido's method for 4-6 hours daily, for 7 years. When he started, Roye was not that impressive or strong. I could do everything he could. Now? He is way past anyone I've seen before! Hard work pays off just as much as good genetics I think.
That's amazing. All this movement work is really really intriguing. I'm excited to see how Ido and his students evolve.

This is a really cool interview of Ido :



He seems allot more calm and approachable in this interview.
 

Tirofijo

Level 6 Valued Member
Ido and his high level students are amazing, but a better gauge would be the progress and improvement of his average students (not the ones that train 4-6 hours a day for 7 years.)

I've read some grumbling online that the progressions in his very expensive programs are unrealistic and folks can't complete them.


Here's Maxwell on Ido. I'm not sure if he's speaking directly about Ido's philosophy/exercises or just dismissing all 30 and 40 year old trainers. Maybe a little of both. (But he makes a good point that you have to expect some injuries from your sport but you shouldn't tolerate injuries from your supplementary training.) Video is just 4 minutes 30 seconds. He mentions getting hurt in kettlebell sport due to pushing it too hard and having poor form.

 
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Adam R Mundorf

Level 6 Valued Member
I've read some grumbling online that the progressions in his very expensive programs are unrealistic and folks can't complete them.
I've read the same. It also costs thousands of dollars. It seems like where Ido begins is where most programs end. You already need excellent control over your body to follow the template. The people who make it through, seem to get fantastic results though.
Here's Maxwell on Ido. I'm not sure if he's speaking directly about Ido's philosophy/exercises or just dismissing all 30 and 40 year old trainers.
I've spoken with Steve about this. Steve believes that unless you've felt the rigors of aging, you really don't understand what goes into training for longevity and health. That's why he preaches following people like Jack Lalanne and others who have proven their methods work into old age. Here's a blog post I wrote a while back about one of my phone conversations with Steve :
My Journey Through Life : Getting Better: Steve Maxwell -- Questions and Answers

Here's a really cool site called movnat and they give some workouts for free. It seems somewhat similar to Ido's work and is really intriguing. A Beginner's Guide to MovNat | MovNat, LLC

Here is Ido's work organized : The Floreio Project
 

IcyROM

Level 2 Valued Member
Ido and his high level students are amazing, but a better gauge would be the progress and improvement of his average students (not the ones that train 4-6 hours a day for 7 years.)

I think there is a confusion. The average Ido student does train 4 hours + a day. That's how much you train in his internships and in his online coaching.

I don't think you can train with him like a personal trainer (1 hour, 3-4 times a week). Maybe I'm wrong.

You already need excellent control over your body to follow the template. The people who make it through, seem to get fantastic results though.

Is this true? All videos I have seen of people progress after 3 months of online coaching shows very weak people (a few pull-ups, maybe ok handstands) and end with very fit people (Muscle-ups, handstand presses, splits, etc). Just youtube "ido portal 3 months".

It's very impressive really.

It also costs thousands of dollars.

Oh did the price went up? It always cost exactly one thousand. I was thinking of maybe doing in the future. One thousand for 3 months of 4-6 hours of daily coached exercise sounds to me like very very good deal for money but maybe I like the glass half full haha.
 

Tirofijo

Level 6 Valued Member
I think there is a confusion. The average Ido student does train 4 hours + a day. That's how much you train in his internships and in his online coaching.

In that case, it's fair to say that the average Ido student isn't very average - as most people can't dedicate 4+ hours a day to training.

Is this true? All videos I have seen of people progress after 3 months of online coaching shows very weak people (a few pull-ups, maybe ok handstands) and end with very fit people (Muscle-ups, handstand presses, splits, etc). Just youtube "ido portal 3 months".

I'd think you should expect good progress in skill work in 288 hours of practice (4 hours a day x 6 days a week x 12 weeks)

If he's somehow able to have his students avoid diminishing returns on those 288 hours for building pure strength then I would be really impressed (though still not for me.)
 

IcyROM

Level 2 Valued Member
In that case, it's fair to say that the average Ido student isn't very average - as most people can't dedicate 4+ hours a day to training.
Average has different meanings so I don't know what you mean.

I think they are average in that they don't have to be gifted, strong or powerful before.

But they are not average in that very few have the time to dedicate to this much training.

If he's somehow able to have his students avoid diminishing returns on those 288 hours for building pure strength then I would be really impressed (though still not for me.)

I think there is confusion that all Ido does is strength. Strength is only a small part of the curriculum (maybe a few hours a week). There is significant time spent stretching and mobility (maybe 1-2 hours a day), lots of time with flow and locomotion (maybe another 1-2 a day), equilibrium (hand and feet and ball juggling etc) and maybe another hour a day of his famous Corset (prehabilitation).

It is a full, complete, generalist system. Ido is as strong as the strongest but also as flexible as the most flexible, as mobile as those most mobile, as good in Handstands as some of best equiblists. You can only get that by training many hours on many disciplines. It is not just strength. It is about skill and movement and flow. Many things I think.

To me it sounds very interesting.
 

Adam R Mundorf

Level 6 Valued Member
Is this true? All videos I have seen of people progress after 3 months of online coaching shows very weak people (a few pull-ups, maybe ok handstands) and end with very fit people (Muscle-ups, handstand presses, splits, etc). Just youtube "ido portal 3 months".

It's very impressive really.
Those are the ones who survive the training. I've been getting allot of my info from Reddit :
What does an Ido Portal online coaching plan involve? • r/bodyweightfitness

It didn't go up in price as far as I know. I just assume that one would continue after 3 months. If you can do the training and put in the time, I'm sure you'll get great results. There seems to be allot of people on Reddit who didn't find the online coaching worth it.

Here's someone who had good results though! : r/bodyweightfitness - I just finished 3 months of online training with Ido Portal AMA.
 
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Tirofijo

Level 6 Valued Member
Average has different meanings so I don't know what you mean.

But they are not average in that very few have the time to dedicate to this much training.

This is exactly what I meant by not average. I'm lucky to get 4 hours a week to train, much less 4 hours a day.


I think there is confusion that all Ido does is strength.

To me it sounds very interesting.

No confusion from me that all he does is strength, but you said (generalizing, i know) that folks may go from a few pullups to a muscle up in 3 months. That might be impressive, depending on how weak the person was at the start of the three months.

You can only gain so much strength in 3 months, no matter how many hours you put in, but on the other hand the skill work (handstands, throw splits in there, movement) would only get better the more time you put in, so I'm not surprised to see vast improvement in those things given all the hours of practice. I would expect it.
 

Tirofijo

Level 6 Valued Member
Those are the ones who survive the training. I've been getting allot of my info from Reddit :
What does an Ido Portal online coaching plan involve? • r/bodyweightfitness

It didn't go up in price as far as I know. I just assume that one would continue after 3 months. If you can do the training and put in the time, I'm sure you'll get great results. There seems to be allot of people on Reddit who didn't find the online coaching worth it.

Here's someone who had good results though! : r/bodyweightfitness - I just finished 3 months of online training with Ido Portal AMA.

Yep. There's going to be a survivorship bias with any program. The ones that do well on ROP shout it from the mountain top (like me) and the ones that don't show great gains kinds don't necessarily go out of their way to share their experience.

But, I think the instagram/facebook-friendly programs/gurus are really guilty of promoting the survivors and hiding the ones that didn't do well. I was following the Gymnastic Bodies (or maybe it was GMB) and they'd have you think everyone is doing splits and one-arm handstands. Turns out many of the folks that pop up on their Facebook feed often have a background in gymnastics/circus arts or already had extreme flexibility. That's why I say show me the 'average' person, not the guy that grew up doing gymnastics. (Plus, their fascination with extreme shoulder mobility seemed off.)
 

Adam R Mundorf

Level 6 Valued Member
That's why I say show me the 'average' person, not the guy that grew up doing gymnastics. (Plus, their fascination with extreme shoulder mobility seemed off.)
On the last link I posted I found out the guy that had success said this : I could do a decent tuck planche, strict muscle up, chest to bar pull-ups, a crummy press to handstand, handstand pushups (Freestanding). I thought I was in good shape, but by Ido's standards I was "s***".
 

IcyROM

Level 2 Valued Member
On the last link I posted I found out the guy that had success said this : I could do a decent tuck planche, strict muscle up, chest to bar pull-ups, a crummy press to handstand, handstand pushups (Freestanding). I thought I was in good shape, but by Ido's standards I was "s***".

This is what is so impressive to me. I would not consider that "strong" either. Just "not weak". Maybe the press I would say is good but depends how terrible it was.

In 3 months person now works on One Arm HS drills, full Front Lever, Straddle L on floor, and mechanical advantage Planche Pushups.

I have been able to do that "starting" level for years now and I still cannot do any of those exercises Zack can do now. After years of training. And he does in 3 months.

Maybe the average person does or not well (impossible to say) but those that "survive" make more progress in 3 months than me in years haha.
 
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