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Other/Mixed If you do exercises like the suitcase deadlift or a similar exercise. Does that help your punch power

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

Habib

Level 1 Valued Member
Suitcase deadlifts ( aka one-sided deadlifts- don't think any1 calls it that ) work your obliques according to beyond bodybuilding because your working against resistance & r trying 2 twist (the obliques twist ur body). In a straight (a type of punch-not a jab), u twist your body which adds power to ur pucnh. So does improving STRENGTH primarily in that movement (not muscle) make your punches more powerful
 

Tjerr

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Yes and No.
You do train the oblique, but specificity demands that you als train the punch movement itself. So while the suitcase deadlifts does train the obliques, doing it as a standalone, without anything else won't increase your punch.

If you do the suitcase deadlift whilst still doing punches a couple of times per week, it may increase the punch.

But there is also a punching technique portion, if you don't root the rear foot, you can be stronger, but still don't generate the maximum amount of power. It is also hard because the deadlift is a grind, an a lot of the punch power comes from the explosiveness.

So long story short, do swings & get ups. That will get your punch strong!
 

Kev

Level 6 Valued Member
All I do is the basic swings, snatches, double C+P, C+J kind of stuff. I got a shot of a heavy bag recently having not hit one in a very long time and I was brutalising that thing. Similarly I got a shot of a kicking shield and my Thai roundhouse was giving the poor bugger holding it a hell of a time. I don’t know if suitcase dead’s etc will make you more powerful but I do know the ballistics and grinds did it for me. I hadn’t kicked a kicking shield for even longer than the last time I set about a heavy bag.
 

bluejeff

Level 6 Valued Member
FWIT, I got an almost immediate boost in punching power from doing Full Contact Twists. Not because it made me that much stronger in one or two workouts, but because it quickly taught me how to connect my hips to my shoulder via my lats and abs.
+1

Also, since the full contact twist is a landmine movement, you might try landmine pressing variations. If done a certain way you will be connecting the ground to your reaching hand the same way you would be during throwing a punch. That is, contralateral foot to hand, or ipsilateral foot to hand. Might be something to experiment with.
 

rwleonard

Level 7 Valued Member
If one is on the fence about buying a land mine, I just made a little corner out of three pieces of scrap wood, stuck it in a real corner in the basement to protect the walls and floor, and used a standard olympic bar to do the FCT's.
 

Stephen B.

Level 5 Valued Member
If one is on the fence about buying a land mine, I just made a little corner out of three pieces of scrap wood, stuck it in a real corner in the basement to protect the walls and floor, and used a standard olympic bar to do the FCT's.
You can also put a 45lbs plate face down on the ground, and stick one end of the barbell in it. That’s how I do landmine drills at home.
 

watchnerd

Level 8 Valued Member
If one is on the fence about buying a land mine, I just made a little corner out of three pieces of scrap wood, stuck it in a real corner in the basement to protect the walls and floor, and used a standard olympic bar to do the FCT's.

Old trick is to cut a tennis ball in half, stick it on one end of the barbell, and jam it in a corner.

I did that for a time, then finally invested in a cheapo $25 landmine post that fits in a plate to make a base.

Works much better, has more angles of motion, don't have worry about scuffing the wall.
 

John Spezzano

Level 6 Valued Member
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Suitcase deadlifts ( aka one-sided deadlifts- don't think any1 calls it that ) work your obliques according to beyond bodybuilding because your working against resistance & r trying 2 twist (the obliques twist ur body). In a straight (a type of punch-not a jab), u twist your body which adds power to ur pucnh. So does improving STRENGTH primarily in that movement (not muscle) make your punches more powerful
I don't mean to be facetious but I recommend you work on your punching. Punching is all about transferring the power generated at your connection to the ground (your feet), through your midsection (via appropriate hip rotation), and delivering it through your fist to the target. If you can keep good grounding, get good rotation, and "sit down" on your punch at the moment of impact, I wager it will help your punching power much more than anything you can do with an external load. I'm certainly not saying don't train your strength. KB and BB training are terrific for building strength and making you "anti-fragile" but there are only so many hours in the day, so if you're trying to punch harder, find a good boxing coach and train with him consistently.
 

Pantrolyx

Level 6 Valued Member
I must agree with those stressing the fact that punching power first and foremost requires hours and hours of technical punching training. Bad grounding, just like wide elbows while pubnching straight, will lead to weak punching, even for very strong suitcase deadlifters.
And I know that as a tremendous anti-talented boxer who for years kickboxed with the punching power of a 97 year old flyweight, despite being above average big and strong in many other areas. Kicking hard came fairly naturally to me, yet the art of punching hard took a long time to get a grip of, despite mass and strength providing the same potential in both areas, more or less.
 

John Spezzano

Level 6 Valued Member
Senior Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Just to add one small bit of anecdotal evidence. Years ago (probably late 90s) I used to go to Freddie Roach's Wildcard gym in Hollywood to hit the bag and shoot the bull with Freddie. Back in those days before his time with Pacquaio and Cotta he wasn't the name trainer he is now so hanging with him was a big part of going there. Anyway, he was training Juan Lazcano at the time (135# champ), meaning he probably walked around at 150ish. I saw him training for an upcoming fight and wished him good luck. He said thanks and clapped me on the shoulder. Fellas, I weighed 175 at the time, I had fought kickboxing 3 times (amateur at 165) and he knocked me sideways with a pat on the shoulder. At 150!!

Boxers spend a lot of time punching and much less time with weights for a very important reason. It's the best way to get good at punching. I'm all for strength training because it makes you more durable and can address the imbalances that all sports develop to varying degrees in the athlete who pursues that sport. But if you want to punch hard, find a good boxing coach and listen to him.
 

Walker

Level 2 Valued Member
I think one arm push ups in combination with suitcase carries work better. Add a leg exercise and you have a full program.
 

Alan Mackey

Level 6 Valued Member
Suitcase deadlifts ( aka one-sided deadlifts- don't think any1 calls it that ) work your obliques according to beyond bodybuilding because your working against resistance & r trying 2 twist (the obliques twist ur body). In a straight (a type of punch-not a jab), u twist your body which adds power to ur pucnh. So does improving STRENGTH primarily in that movement (not muscle) make your punches more powerful
Cleans (any variation, using any implement) and push presses (not presses, not jerks) are the only exercises with a very significant impact on my striking power.

Being strong all-around (squats, deadlifts, dips, pull ups, bench, rows, presses…) is always a good thing and may improve you punching power. But, in my opinion, cleans and push presses (not necessarily in a sequence) are all a martial artist needs.
 
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North Coast Miller

Level 8 Valued Member
Coach Jason Van Veldhuysen (Precision Striking) mentioned in one of his videos that the humble burpee greatly increased his punching power.
 

Dayz

Level 7 Valued Member
I spent about 15 years boxing and kickboxing, with a few amateur fights. I started at 12/13.

When I started strength training ~age 20 my power went up drastically. I did Starting Strength with a barbell 2x per week. I'm 99% certain it was the strength training that made the difference, but note that that is on top of 6 days of technique training. IMHO the latter is what allowed the strength increases to transfer.
 

Mark Limbaga

Level 8 Valued Member
Elite Certified Instructor
TS, how much striking specific work do you get?

I can give you this: some of the hardest punchers I have known usually have a good amount of relative strength
 
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