Interested in your opinion- S&S progression?

Goodo

Level 6 Valued Member
Hi All,
I'm currently doing a ratio of 24 28 28 28 24 for both swings and getups. I went to a 28 rather than a 32 at the time because I couldn't do a getup with the 32 (was scared to try to be honest), but alas here I am and I can now do a getup with the 32 both sides.

My dilemma is should I stick with the progression through the 28s and eventually implement the 32 with a 28 32 28 28 28 ratio in a few months, or now knowing that I can lift the 32 go into 24 32 24 24 24 and build from there.

I'm not sure what the pros or cons of each could be so keen to here your thoughts, recommendations, and experiences.

Thanks😎👊👊👊
 

Bro Mo

Level 6 Valued Member
I would say to finish the cycle you're on. I would only worry about increasing a weight if the weight you're using is so easy, you get nothing from it.

Swings can still be relatively light and yet max power be developed due to higher acceleration. The getup can grow from using a shoe so I imagine you'll also get better at it with a measly 28kg.

Perhaps the middle ground is reducing the steps with the 28kg from 4 weeks, down to two weeks each.

Strength is a marathon, he who lifts the longest, gets the strongest.
 

pet'

Level 8 Valued Member
Hello,

should I stick with the progression through the 28s and eventually implement the 32 with a 28 32 28 28 28 ratio in a few months
This is exactly what I did, with excellent results, so I agree with BroMo when he says to finish your cycle.

A lot of people are proponent of big jumps, but basically, do what works for you.

Kind regards,

Pet'
 

IMayAgainKnowChris

Level 5 Valued Member
I jumped from 16 to 24 and it actually felt better because the weight sort of let me know where my form was off. That jump wasn’t too bad. I’ve never picked up a 32 but can only imagine it’ll be a little bit more of a challenge. Pavel recommends 8kg jumps for a few reasons I can’t remember. But that’s what’s sort of nice about S and S is that it doesn’t need to be done in a set amt of time (unless testing) which means if you go heavier and have good form you could probably just rest longer between sets.
Can’t find a 32kg to save my life anyhow so I’ll be working with the 24 for a bit.
 

Papa Georgio

Level 5 Valued Member
Hi All,
I'm currently doing a ratio of 24 28 28 28 24 for both swings and getups. I went to a 28 rather than a 32 at the time because I couldn't do a getup with the 32 (was scared to try to be honest), but alas here I am and I can now do a getup with the 32 both sides.

My dilemma is should I stick with the progression through the 28s and eventually implement the 32 with a 28 32 28 28 28 ratio in a few months, or now knowing that I can lift the 32 go into 24 32 24 24 24 and build from there.

I'm not sure what the pros or cons of each could be so keen to here your thoughts, recommendations, and experiences.

Thanks😎👊👊👊
IMO, S&S works better when volume is built up slower over time. And, you can accumulate more volume when you are using a submaximal weight. A lot of people get into trouble and stall out in S&S because they try to use a weight too heavy. This is how I like to describe it:

Max weight: This is the weight you can eke out 1 or a couple of reps. Best used for padding your ego and making instagram posts. You can't do an entire session (100 swings & 10 getups) with it.

Challenge weight: This is the weight where you are capable of doing a whole session (100 swings & 10 getups), but you can't do it all the time. This is where a lot of people want to operate, but they quickly stall out and then claim its due to boredom.

Everyday weight: This is the weight where you can do your full session, and do it darn near every day. Once your weekly volume is established, you don't get sore or too wore out.

S&S works better when you work on slowly raising your "Everyday" weight up over time. For instance, when I got to doing 40kg as my "everyday weight" , I noticed I could pull off some decent reps with the 48kg. I had to resist the temptation because it could risk injury or feeling too sore to work out the next day. BTW: I eventually got up to doing the 48kg, 5 days a week, and I shamelessly used 4kg jumps.

To your question, I would encourage you to stay on your current progression by working up to doing all sets with 28kg, and feel comfortable with your sessions before adding in sets of the 32kg.

Good Luck!
 

Greg H

Level 3 Valued Member
I couldn't do the 24kg-32kg jump. At 49, I was having recovery issues and was trashed for fun cardio i.e. biking and hiking. I was also having wrist/arm strain and some slight elbow tweaks from the TGUs. I knew I could do the 28kg, so went to all swings/TGU at 28 kg, timeless. Now I am starting to work in the 32 kg per S&S 2.0. I'm glad I didn't gut it out and insist on stating with 24/32kg jump.
 

Goodo

Level 6 Valued Member
IMO, S&S works better when volume is built up slower over time. And, you can accumulate more volume when you are using a submaximal weight. A lot of people get into trouble and stall out in S&S because they try to use a weight too heavy. This is how I like to describe it:

Max weight: This is the weight you can eke out 1 or a couple of reps. Best used for padding your ego and making instagram posts. You can't do an entire session (100 swings & 10 getups) with it.

Challenge weight: This is the weight where you are capable of doing a whole session (100 swings & 10 getups), but you can't do it all the time. This is where a lot of people want to operate, but they quickly stall out and then claim its due to boredom.

Everyday weight: This is the weight where you can do your full session, and do it darn near every day. Once your weekly volume is established, you don't get sore or too wore out.

S&S works better when you work on slowly raising your "Everyday" weight up over time. For instance, when I got to doing 40kg as my "everyday weight" , I noticed I could pull off some decent reps with the 48kg. I had to resist the temptation because it could risk injury or feeling too sore to work out the next day. BTW: I eventually got up to doing the 48kg, 5 days a week, and I shamelessly used 4kg jumps.

To your question, I would encourage you to stay on your current progression by working up to doing all sets with 28kg, and feel comfortable with your sessions before adding in sets of the 32kg.

Good Luck!
Great post. It's kinda hard to think differently after reading that and it's consitent with the other replies also. Slow and steady it is. I will own the 28 before I start thinking about the 32 (puts phone down and starts trash taking the 28).
 
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