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Kettlebell Iron Cardio

mvikred

Level 5 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I agree. Having watched all the videos. For me the biggest takeaway was biomechanics breathing to whichever sequence one designs.

One place where I do something slightly different from how @Brett Jones demonstrates is on the clean. I take in air before I hike, then hike and power breathe in sync with the hip thrust to get the bell to the rack and then I take in a sip of breath with the bell in rack then I press and power breathe. This has become so natural to me now (even if it is slightly inefficient) that I might find it difficult to change to what is suggested in the video.

Another point that I thought would be great to cover was how a sequence of pattern can have different training impacts - i.e. if I do a clean+press+snatch+squat vs clean+snatch+press+squat. Maybe no impact with single reps but if one starts added double reps it could feel different. Something to experiment with for sure.

Also curious how one can use HR to guide training as not everyone is super intuitive - the way I approach in general to long sets like this is start and let HR recover to 70-75% of my MHR and then continue to do so. If I fix my number of sets 40 or 60 and then track how less time I take then probably I will know if my work capacity is improving.

Definitely looking forward to the book and all have some thoughts formulated regarding programming but I'm sure this is an inexperienced mind being excited at the possibilities of what it can make from the broad principles that have been laid out.
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
I am very excited about this release and am looking forward to the book!

I wonder how applicable this is for beginners, how much hypertrophy, conditioning, and strength are to be expected, and how this compares with plans like ROP and the Giant.
 

Cochran

Level 2 Valued Member
@Brett Jones Will we be notified about the PDF download once it’s available?

Also, a quick training question - I can’t sit in the butterfly position to perform the shoulder warmup. Any alternatives?

Thank you! Very excited about this.
 

Brett Jones

StrongFirst Director of Education
Master Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Beast Tamer
I am very excited about this release and am looking forward to the book!

I wonder how applicable this is for beginners, how much hypertrophy, conditioning, and strength are to be expected, and how this compares with plans like ROP and the Giant.
This product is very much directed at beginners but with the snatches and progressions it can be used for quite some time.
 

Brett Jones

StrongFirst Director of Education
Master Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Beast Tamer
@Brett Jones Will we be notified about the PDF download once it’s available?

Also, a quick training question - I can’t sit in the butterfly position to perform the shoulder warmup. Any alternatives?

Thank you! Very excited about this.
You can perform the shoulder section in seiza or tall kneeling and see if the routine opens up the hips enough to get into the butterfly position.
Having a session with an FMS certified StrongFirst Certified Instructor might save you some time though.
 

Brett Jones

StrongFirst Director of Education
Master Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Beast Tamer
I agree. Having watched all the videos. For me the biggest takeaway was biomechanics breathing to whichever sequence one designs.

One place where I do something slightly different from how @Brett Jones demonstrates is on the clean. I take in air before I hike, then hike and power breathe in sync with the hip thrust to get the bell to the rack and then I take in a sip of breath with the bell in rack then I press and power breathe. This has become so natural to me now (even if it is slightly inefficient) that I might find it difficult to change to what is suggested in the video.
The inhale up into the clean and pressing really "sets up" the press very well. Especially for heavier pressing
Another point that I thought would be great to cover was how a sequence of pattern can have different training impacts - i.e. if I do a clean+press+snatch+squat vs clean+snatch+press+squat. Maybe no impact with single reps but if one starts added double reps it could feel different. Something to experiment with for sure.
I would keep in mind the guideline of 3-5 reps per set and not extending the sets. I will admit to being very much in the habit of only using the original sequence.
Also curious how one can use HR to guide training as not everyone is super intuitive - the way I approach in general to long sets like this is start and let HR recover to 70-75% of my MHR and then continue to do so. If I fix my number of sets 40 or 60 and then track how less time I take then probably I will know if my work capacity is improving.
HR may not be a reliable guide but experimentation may prove otherwise.
Definitely looking forward to the book and all have some thoughts formulated regarding programming but I'm sure this is an inexperienced mind being excited at the possibilities of what it can make from the broad principles that have been laid out.
mvikred,

Thank you
 

Brett Jones

StrongFirst Director of Education
Master Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Beast Tamer
@Brett Jones I just finished my first 20-minute session of cheat clean + press + squat + pull-up. One rep of each but I’m surprised at the pump I got out of it haha

One more question, what do you recommend as a cool-down?
Excellent

Cool down can vary—I will sometimes finish my session with a few sets of easy swings or just some fast and loose drills leading to a bit of stretching out
 

Ryan T

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I am very excited about this release and am looking forward to the book!

I wonder how applicable this is for beginners, how much hypertrophy, conditioning, and strength are to be expected, and how this compares with plans like ROP and the Giant.
I think in the long run, ROP, The Giant, S&S, Q&D, IC... all deliver on multiple aspects of physical health.

My take is IC is very much a template to build your base (and keep building it) because:

a.) high return for low biological cost
b.) ease of consistency

You'll always need to switch things up, periodically, especially if you have a specific end that you're trying to train for or peaking, but this seems a solid way to chop wood, punch the clock, etc...

There are also other "levers" you can pull (nutrition, easy aerobic exercise, etc...), to assist with developing certain attributes.
 

matteo

Level 6 Valued Member
I purchased this excellent product (and also "kettlebell strongfirst" with a 80% code discount)
I have already watched all the videos, but I can't find the frequency of the program. Three days a week? Or maybe 4/5 days a week are sustainable?
Thanks
Matteo
 

Bauer

Level 7 Valued Member
I purchased this excellent product (and also "kettlebell strongfirst" with a 80% code discount)
I have already watched all the videos, but I can't find the frequency of the program. Three days a week? Or maybe 4/5 days a week are sustainable?
Thanks
Matteo
Is there still an active discount code for Iron Cardio?

Thanks @Ryan T for the answer.
 

Ryan T

Level 6 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
I purchased this excellent product (and also "kettlebell strongfirst" with a 80% code discount)
I have already watched all the videos, but I can't find the frequency of the program. Three days a week? Or maybe 4/5 days a week are sustainable?
Thanks
Matteo
You'll probably get guidance on the frequency in the forthcoming book, but practically it depends on your other activities, ability to recover and goals.
 

paules

Level 3 Valued Member
Iron Cardio has been a mainstay of my training for the past 12 months. The thing I love about it, other than its simplicity, is its flexibility. I have run the protocol with both single bells, double bells and sandbags; sometimes with my 5RM other times with my 3RM; 5 days a week of 20 minutes sessions a day; 3 days a week alternating with steady state cardio; 2 days a week alternating with snatch practice; sometimes as a standalone protocol other times paired with deadlifts and/or loaded carries. I suspect it may not be the optimum protocol for strength, hypertrophy or conditioning but as an all round protocol for GPP and longevity, it might be hard to beat.
 
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Brett Jones

StrongFirst Director of Education
Master Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Beast Tamer
I purchased this excellent product (and also "kettlebell strongfirst" with a 80% code discount)
I have already watched all the videos, but I can't find the frequency of the program. Three days a week? Or maybe 4/5 days a week are sustainable?
Thanks
Matteo
Ballpark 3 days a week and it depends on if you combing it with any other training (like S&S).

If you are combining with S&S I would shoot for 2 days of each or maybe 2 days Iron Cardio and 3 days S&S—depends on recovery.
 
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