Kefir

Discussion in 'Diet and Nutrition' started by Harald Motz, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. Harald Motz

    Harald Motz Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    A few years ago I ordered some milk Kefir cultures, and was an avid producer, or I should say more precisely observer and consument of Kefir and the Kefir cultures, which did the work of transformation all by itself. So I was a Kefir culturist.

    I moved into a new apartment almost two years ago, and since then my Kefir culturism ended abruptly. I forgot about them, I remembered them a again a bit over two weeks ago.
    I ordered some, to make half a litre of kefir from half a litre of milk.

    I put the cultures into a jar of preserving glas with a rubber seal, so no additional oxygen can enter the glas, but the pressure from the gas (build up of carbonic acid) that builds up inside can go out. It has to stay 10-25 degrees Celsius, around room temperature. I put a big towel over it because it does not like much light.

    After one day there are two phases, one on top looking like a white foam, consisting of casein. I take the glass, shake it gently (that shoud make a really creamy consistence) and it stays for another day. Then I open the glass, stir it up with a big plastic spoon, as the cultures do not like metal, that the casein which separates above dissolves with the compete fluid, than I pour the whole thing throug a plastic sieve in which are the cultures then, which I wash with some water, that the rest of casein that build up around the kefir grains gets of.

    the grains of kefir come into a fresh glass with fresh milk, to make in a fermentation process out of lactose Kefir, which is totally different from milk. It makes out of pasteurized milk totally vivid kefir. It has a mild sour taste, contains carbonic acid which tingles just slightly on the tongue.

    So in an almost two week period, the cutures got more, that I today can use instead of half a litre of milk three times of it. Kefir is a totally living organism. It was and is always enjoyable to me to watch the living of it, how it changes the milk, which gets something totally different in the process. When there is a bit to much cutures than milk, than you have eventually two phases in the glass: up there is the casein, down there is watery fluid, which is whey.

    So I wanted to share my enjoyment being a revived Kefir Culturist, for the pro milk fraction and for the anti milk fraction also, because there is water kefir too, which I enjoyed some more years ago, also.

    Have a nice refreshing weekend all of You.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
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  2. Antti

    Antti More than 2500 posts

    Interesting stuff. I don't really eat other dairy than quark but Cultivating Kefir sounds like a hobby that rewards in many ways.
     
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  3. ali

    ali Quadruple-Digit Post Count

    @Harald Motz, looks like you've had more success than I had. A couple of years ago I bought myself some live cultures and started my own kefir lab. I agree, as a milk lover too, it has a nice, tangy taste. So there I was with bottles of the stuff at varying degrees of maturity, then something happened. Like a scene from 60s sci-fi horror movie the stuff was everywhere, growing exponentially on an industrial scale I couldn't keep up with the outbreak. Running out of suitable and enough containers to keep up the the growth of the goo, I couldn't possibly drink it all either, divorce threatened and I had visions of swat teams wearing nbc suits kicking my door in to save mankind from alien life forms. So I stopped. I buy it occasionally, ready made, from a Polish supermarket. Probably not the same but a lot less stressful.
     
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  4. Harald Motz

    Harald Motz Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    @ali : always enjoying your great sense of picturescque humor.
    That is what it does.

    @Antti : yes quark mixed up with fresh fruits is a staple of me
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2016
  5. Steve Freides

    Steve Freides Forum Administrator Senior Certified Instructor

    We buy the stuff from Trader Joe's sometimes. One of the wonderful things about Kefir is that it really doesn't need refrigeration for at least several days, so you can take it with you places you might not be able to take milk.

    I've tried making it on my own but haven't in years. I do roast my own coffee, however. :)

    -S-
     
  6. Harald Motz

    Harald Motz Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    that is what the nomads do.
    home roasted coffee, with a shot of home made kefir, mmhhh... I don't know. But nevertheless I am about to get some real stuff in a few minutes...
    20160118_162419.jpg 20160118_162503.jpg Kefir cultures did some multiplication work.
     
  7. Wesker11

    Wesker11 More than 300 posts

    A slow cooker is a life saver. Saves so much time and I use it nearly every day. Crock pot meatloaf is a staple of my diet. :)
     
  8. Keep Lifting

    Keep Lifting Triple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    what are the benefits of kefir - i've never tried it - do you use it as a primary protein source? good for pre/post workout meal? easy on the stomach - other benefits - probiotics?
     
  9. Steve Freides

    Steve Freides Forum Administrator Senior Certified Instructor

    IMHO, probiotic is the main benefit, plus it's a real, old-fashioned food.

    -S-
     
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  10. Henningb

    Henningb Triple-Digit Post Count

    Allergic to diary products, so kefir is not an option unless the allergens is broken down.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2016
  11. Harald Motz

    Harald Motz Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    @Keep Lifting : +1 what Steve said. It good for digestion, I like the taste and to experiment to get the " perfect" kefir, as there are some parameters that influence the outcome. Kefir and milk are the same but totally different. Metamorphosis.
     
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  12. Steve Freides

    Steve Freides Forum Administrator Senior Certified Instructor

    Slow cooker posts in this thread moved to Slow Cooker

    I split one post by @Henningb, otherwise moved them.

    -S-
     
  13. Harald Motz

    Harald Motz Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    @Steve Freides : I am very pleased, to see that the kefir culture sprout out a totally new tribe. Kefir knows a thing or two about metamorphosis.
     
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  14. Anna C

    Anna C More than 5000 posts Elite Certified Instructor

    Keep Lifting likes this.
  15. Harald Motz

    Harald Motz Quadruple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    @Anna C : When you like it from the store, you will like doing your own even lot more. Period. And this is the real deal. When sieved, kefir is still living and working, thus changing itself over time. Kefir is a living organism. It is vital and gives one vitalism. But, I have to admit...I am biased.
     
  16. Henningb

    Henningb Triple-Digit Post Count

    This got me a bit curious, not for me, but for my wife. She likes yogurt in the morning and she often make it herself. Have you tried culturing own yogurt and if yes, why do you prefer kefir? Secondly I think its a bit hard to get the kefir culture starter here in Thailand, so if purchased, can the starter become a perpetual culture? Is it possible to make it dormant in the freezer?
     
  17. Misabi

    Misabi Double-Digit Post Count

    I'm interested to see if your grains would work with coconut milk.

    An option for those without the time or space to look after what sounds like something from "The Blob" :)

    I've recently gotten hooked on coconut milk yoghurt. As it was too expensive to buy regularly i looked into making my own and found recipes using dairy mik yoghurt starter or the contents of probiotic capsules. Then i remembered i had a few sachets of kefir starter culture, which when used with a litre of cows milk you can then take a cup and seed another litre of milk to make more kefir and do this a further 4 times.

    I've now got my 3rd batch brewing. The first i left at room temp for a day or two at which point it was like kefir then refrigerated and after a couple of days it thickened and set like the store bought yoghurt :)

    The second batch stayed more liquid, which i think was due to a cooler couple of days when it was sitting in the bench top.

    I've also done a batch with probiotic tablets crushed to powder form and added to the milk which I'd warmed on the stove. 3 to 4 tablets/capsules to a litre seems to be about right ymmv.

    You can also add some sugar, honey or maple syrup to feed the little blighters a bit more during the fermentation phase.
     
  18. Keep Lifting

    Keep Lifting Triple-Digit Post Count Certified Instructor

    so much research taking place these days between the brain-gut connection with a possible link to anxiety and other behavioral disorders - thanks for the link - i look forward to ingesting this one.
     
  19. Anna C

    Anna C More than 5000 posts Elite Certified Instructor

    Yes they talk about that quite a bit in the book. Fascinating stuff, and well written; for the layperson but not over simplified like so many health-related books are. I was surprised to find that they're not very "pro" on taking probiotic supplements, although they're certainly not against it, and advise that it's probably a good idea following a course of antibiotics. The book explains why. They are VERY big on fermented foods like kefir.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  20. Steve Freides

    Steve Freides Forum Administrator Senior Certified Instructor

    Silly question, perhaps, but what happens if I just take a whole milk yogurt and leave it out for a few days? Do I get kefir or do I get a stomach ache?

    -S-
     

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