Old Forum Kettlebell "jogging"

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Physical Culture

Level 6 Valued Member
 

I know this community favors intense cardio intervals, but it is generally accepted that most people also need at least some steady-state cardio at a moderate intensity.  Some GS competitors use a light kettlebell for some of their cardio (though most run or row as well).

I thought I'd give an example of this kind of cardio.  I took five classic kettlebell lifts: swings, presses, snatches, jerks, clean and jerks (notice alternating a pull and a push).  I took a 12k kettlebell and did each lift for 2 minutes. I did all one hand, then the other.  Each rep was easy, but it kept my heart rate in the mid 140's for 20 minutes.  Also good for grip and shoulder endurance, since it's 10 minutes per arm.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VW86tSgUIWo&feature=youtu.be
 

Physical Culture

Level 6 Valued Member
Andy,  I did it today, starting about 6:30 am.  Felt great immediately after, and feel good now.  No specific aches and pains (like my knees hurt after I run), and feel energized.  It was honestly one of the best cardio sessions I've had in a long time.  Usually I run or use my ski machine, and I hate it because it's monotonous and repetitive.  This was fun.

I was not familiar with Pavel's source you mentioned.  I'll have to check it out.  Thanks!
 

aussieluke

Level 5 Valued Member
Nice work Steve. Lovely form on all the lifts considering the light weight.

 

You might also consider 30-60 minutes of 1ALC with a 12 or 16 as another option. Switch hands whenever - maybe every 10 reps or every minute.
 

Physical Culture

Level 6 Valued Member
Luke, this is good advice, and I've done 30 minutes of OALC and 3o minutes of nonstop swings before with the 12k.  It's harder than it sounds, even with the light weight.  I chose these lifts because they are classical kettlebell lifts that I think have merit and everyone should do, but I focus primarily on long cycle, so if I don't build presses and snatches into my program somewhere, they just won't happen.  I'm sure I'll mix it up, adding in front squats, halos, round the body passes, and other exercises for variety.
 

Jason Ginsberg

Level 4 Valued Member
This is brilliant Steve, really great stuff. Gems like this are one of the main reasons I participate in this forum. At first I didn't "get" the exercises and their order, but once you pointed out the alternating push and pull, the penny dropped.

Really intelligent selection of exercises; particularly good for GS, but very applicable for any kettlebell lifter. I'm going to try this out, and play with some variations on it as well, and once I've experimented with it myself, will definitely use it with other people.

The video is great as well; you've got very solid GS technique. This is flexible enough to do either way though, which is part of why I like it so much. Thanks for sharing.
 

Pavel

Founder and Chairman
Certified Instructor
Very good, Steve.  I am all for aerobic training; see ES.
 

Physical Culture

Level 6 Valued Member
Pavel, I actually decided to do this after my coach mentioned that Anton Anasenko does it.  Something clicked, and I went back and re-read parts of the original RKC book, where you discuss Heavyhands.  I got the Heavyhands book a while back and honestly tried to get into it, but I just could not.  You referred to kettlebell ballistic lifts as a manlier version of Schwartz' panaerobics.  When my coach suggested this, I thought "this is what Pavel was talking about all along!" Next time I may do this again, then switch hands and run through it a second time at one minute per lift, to make 30 minutes.

Jason, thanks.  The push/pull definitely spreads the fatigue around.  Yes, my technique is suited to sport style lifting, but you could do it hardstyle, I imagine.  There are certain hardstyle features that might be difficult to maintain for time like this, like the crush grip and glute cramp in the press.  The fact that sport technique allows rest in the rack or lockout makes a big difference in long sets.
 

Pavel

Founder and Chairman
Certified Instructor
Steve, this sounds like a topic for another article for you!

Ladies and gents, if you are not training for GS, I would add "kime", a hip pop with forceful exhalation while keeping the effort low and explosiveness "medium" (more than GS, less than typical hard style).
 

Pavel

Founder and Chairman
Certified Instructor
To add: like an experienced full contact karateka who decided to work on the heavy bag that long.  Relaxed, yet heavy and with a "pop".
 

kris

Level 3 Valued Member
Yes Steeve, a very good warm up also, good to raise your hart beat, light and kick, still with a proper technique. And it is " low impact ", good for joints and back !!!
 

Mattsirpeace

Level 4 Valued Member
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345977

Hope I got the link to work.  Science proves that yes, there is such a thing as kettlebell jogging.  They used two-hand swings and sumo deadlifts.
 

Physical Culture

Level 6 Valued Member
Thanks, Matt!  I'd be interested to look more at the protocol.  They used novice men and women to do three 10m sets of "continuous" swings.  Even with a very light weight, 10m is a long time for an untrained person to keep swinging nonstop, so I wonder what they mean by "continuous".
 

Mattsirpeace

Level 4 Valued Member
Steve, actually, thanks for the thread.  It helped me still use a bell when hike/jog/climb was my priority.  Typically I would go on a barefoot nosebreathing jog, then without stopping finish up with 5 or 10 minutes nonstop with a 20 lb. bell.  Just barely enough to provide a counterbalance for squats and inertia for swings.  The only rest was an extra breath at the snatch lockout or doing a smaller movement like a halo or an around-the-body pass.  Thrusters also work.  Not strength training, just mobility maintenance and bonus aerobics.  Even with hammered legs I could still do this session and feel good at the end.

The study is a classic case of science playing catch up.  It's linked at www.kettlebellscience.com  Scroll down to "scientific kettlebell articles".
 

Mattsirpeace

Level 4 Valued Member
http://www.strongfirst.com/strongfirst-roadwork/

http://breakingmuscle.com/books-dvds/the-cardio-code-book-review

I see consensus.
 

ali

Level 6 Valued Member
Cardio Code - looks like another book I'm going to have to buy! Anyone here read it? Thanks Matt, more stuff to buy, expensive interest this. Collecting renaissance paintings by the Masters might be a cheaper interest!
 

Mattsirpeace

Level 4 Valued Member
This probably should be a topic, but I'll tack it on to Steve's thread:

http://www.cardiocode.dk/resources/articles/new_research/Jay2014_2/index.html

I don't see any huge controversy since Pavel already has a couple sections on jogging in Easy Strength.  It's just a bit alarming to hear that biomechanical breathing swings could have an "extremely negative" effect on heart health.  Wee bit overstated?

You can't see your heart, and can't really feel it.  With skeletal muscle, you can feel it during the lift, with next-day soreness, and with long-term growth.  I wonder if the heart might be analogous to the adductors;  if you squat deep with any halfway legit weight your adductors get both strong and flexible.  Can the heart do the same thing?

Another forum member motivated me to read Training For the New Alpinism.  It finally convinced me that since I enjoy moving fast in the mountains all day, I need low-intensity high-volume aerobics.  Specificity.  To quote Alicia Silverstone in Clueless, "does the word 'duh' mean anything to you?"

 
 
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