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Other/Mixed Kettlebells or DL?

Other strength modalities (e.g., Clubs), mixed strength modalities (e.g., combined kettlebell and barbell), other goals (flexibility)

Girevik007

Level 2 Valued Member
Hey all,
Im working on programing and im wondering if i had to choose either the DL/barbell or kettlebell swing what would everyone recc?
I'm 24 and I mainly trained with calithstenics and free weights.
I started looking into hip hinge movements after realizing that the only people that were smoking me in BJJ have high DLs or swings.
My first attempts at DLs and kettlebells where a real eye opener as i realized that my mobility and ROM is not good.
(Sort of a ego check as I am very advanced in bodyweight training. feels weird to be starting at the bottom of the ladder again )
So I want to know what would everyone recc me work on hip hinge with DL/barbells or kettlebells?
 

Pete L

Level 5 Valued Member
and if you only could do one ?
For me swings because I'm old and there is more of a power component. But I'd want to add in the proviso that I can do cleans as well.
Also, I can do them at home. I'm buying a barbell shortly and it will have to find a home in the garage.
 

jozko

Level 2 Valued Member
Barbell deadlift is better for building maximal strength. If you do Romanian deadlift, which is my favorite, you'll experience considerable time under tension and it quite likely will improve your knee health.
Swing is ballistic movement. Although not as good strength builder as barbell deadlift, you can become decent deadlifter just by doing swings. It goes without saying that if you want to be a good deadlifter, you should deadlift more. The biggest advantage of swing for me personally is that it can build both strength and endurance. Swings are also lower impact exercise than deadlifts, which is worth considering when planning.

If you combine them in a right way, they have great synergistic effect on each other.

If you need to pick one, perhaps do swings most of the year, and then spend 8-12 weeks on deadlift focused protocol.
 

BJJ Shawn

Level 6 Valued Member
I thought kettlebell swings had prepared me for deadlifts, but I was wrong. I worked up to Timed Simple and completed the 10,000 swing challenge immediately before trying barbell deadlifts for the first time, and my first cycle of PTTP I topped out at 5 x 255 (if I remember correctly), which is not TERRIBLE, but only about 1.5 bodyweight. Within 4 months of deadlifting, I was able to add over 50lbs to that number and felt much stronger overall. I don't have a bell heavier than 32, but without spending any time swinging since hitting simple I am easily able to swing 2 x 20kg bells for sets of 10, and 2 x 24kg for sets of 5 with no problem.

Swings didn't really improve my deadlift, but deadlifting improved (or at least maintained) my swings.
 

Anna C

Level 9 Valued Member
Team Leader Certified Instructor
Elite Certified Instructor
Sinister
For you I'm thinking deadlift would be more effective than kettlebell swings in bringing your hip hinge strength up to par with your bodyweight/calisthenics ability.
 

Steve A

Level 6 Valued Member
Hey all,
Im working on programing and im wondering if i had to choose either the DL/barbell or kettlebell swing what would everyone recc?
I'm 24 and I mainly trained with calithstenics and free weights.
I started looking into hip hinge movements after realizing that the only people that were smoking me in BJJ have high DLs or swings.
My first attempts at DLs and kettlebells where a real eye opener as i realized that my mobility and ROM is not good.
(Sort of a ego check as I am very advanced in bodyweight training. feels weird to be starting at the bottom of the ladder again )
So I want to know what would everyone recc me work on hip hinge with DL/barbells or kettlebells?
If you can't do hip flexion/extension properly, then you should NOT be doing any ballistic hip extension/flexion movement. So you should not be doing swings at this point. You can do deadlifts if you keep them sub-maximal for both load and range of motion. You should work on improving range of motion before progressing load. Not a barbell or kettlebell, but you can work on that mobility and ROM with numerous BW exercises.
 

John K

Level 7 Valued Member
Certified Instructor
Why the choice of either or? Is it an access issue? How often can you train the it?

I would pick whichever I could do most bestest, or whichever I had access to someone who could teach me.

If you are only willing to set up 1 day a week to train it, I would probably say deadlift.

Now if you asked what *I* would do ...

Personally, I would choose both, deadlifting (or a variation) once or twice a week, and swinging once or twice a week. Then I'd learn how to (KB) snatch. E.g. Monday - Deadlift; Wednesday - Snatch (or swing), Friday - Deadlift; Monday - Snatch (or swing); etc.

Personally, once my working weight is over 400lbs, on weeks where I am deadlifting twice, I would most likely make one of those sessions a variation day - deficits (if you have the mobility), block pull, stiff leg, etc.

Putting that all together, my plan would look like...

Monday - Snatch
Wednesday - Deadlift
Friday - Snatch
Monday - 4" block pull, hold at top for 5-10s (no straps); 4" deficit stiff-leg for 1-2 sets of 8-15
Wednesday - Snatch
Friday - Deadlift
Repeat two week block.
 

Dayz

Level 6 Valued Member
As a beginner, both will add to your strength and power.

As an intermediate, deadlifts will build your maximal strength and your power simultaneously and quite dramatically, while swings will build your power, but only add minimally to your strength.

The best is to combine them. Build strength with the DL, learn to express that strength very quickly (powerfully) via swings.

Edit:
As an example, I can swing the 40 very powerfully and the 48 well. I recently started deadlifting - albeit adding them in very slowly and haven't tried to max/nursing a glute injury - but was nevertheless surprised the light weights I'm using don't feel even lighter.
 

watchnerd

Level 7 Valued Member
At age 24?

Deadlifts.

You're at the prime point in your life to get really effing strong.

You're near your biological peak to build muscle and make gains.

Get gains now and you'll have to do much less work to simply maintain them later in life than if you try to build that same strength later.

The majority of my baseline / muscle memory strength is based upon foundations I laid down with strength training work in my 20s.

I'm not as strong as I was then, but I'm a lot stronger than my age peers who are just now trying to work on their strength and put on muscle mass later in life.
 

Hrungnir

Level 1 Valued Member
kettlebells and deadlifts go together like pickles and vodka.
Uh, how do you garnish your bloody marys?! Then we get into the pubescent pickle, cukes, and the amazing ways it complements vodka. Pickles kissing cousins would also say they get along with vodka in a Gibson and dirty martini. Then there are all those crazy Scandinavians drinking aquavit, which is the worst part of pickles and the worst part of vodka that they absolutely adore.

Pickles and vodka are a dynamic pair.
 
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