Knee pain when running

Pinkninja

Triple-Digit Post Count
Hi there,
I usually post in the Kettlebell section but this problem of mine seems better here. Ive been a runner for about 20 years..I run probably 3 days a week atm with other days doing kettlebells and strength training. Ive never ever had any issues with injuries. I am not sure why but for the past 2 months I am getting a sharp pain in the outer side of my knee about 40 minutes in to my run. It always hurts at the same time on my run...same street of the course and the street is no different to the other ones I run on. I bought a pair of Brooks Adrenaline and noticed the knee pain soon after. Im not sure if its a coincidence or if the shoes could be the cause. Its really impacting my training because I love running. Does anyone here have any similar experiences and what have you found works? Should I change shoes?
It never hurts at any other time during the day and I wear the shoes to work 3 times a week. The only time I get pain is when I sit cross legged and then go to stand up. Im 44 years old.
 

Bro Mo

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
I've had IT band syndrome and it sounds like that to me. It would hurt when I would go down stairs but not hurt when going up stairs. My guess is that the new shoes change your gait someway.

I recently got some new shoes from Brooks and they gave me bad plantar fasciitis. I emailed brooks and they redunded me and recommended a different model which fixed the issue. O would contact Brooks and see what they recommend or simply return them and go back to a model that worked in the past.
 

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
Hi there,
I usually post in the Kettlebell section but this problem of mine seems better here. Ive been a runner for about 20 years..I run probably 3 days a week atm with other days doing kettlebells and strength training. Ive never ever had any issues with injuries. I am not sure why but for the past 2 months I am getting a sharp pain in the outer side of my knee about 40 minutes in to my run. It always hurts at the same time on my run...same street of the course and the street is no different to the other ones I run on. I bought a pair of Brooks Adrenaline and noticed the knee pain soon after. Im not sure if its a coincidence or if the shoes could be the cause. Its really impacting my training because I love running. Does anyone here have any similar experiences and what have you found works? Should I change shoes?
It never hurts at any other time during the day and I wear the shoes to work 3 times a week. The only time I get pain is when I sit cross legged and then go to stand up. Im 44 years old.
Hi @Pinkninja , I started running late last year at 59 yo, had some calf problems initially but all is good now. Being a karate guy for 3 decades+ I've always trained barefoot and recommend minimal shoes. The shoes I use are all zero drop ana some have thicker soles than others, I prefer to run in Merrell Vapor Glove or the Trail Glove.
I run 12 to 16 mi per week and actually prefer to trail run, it works the legs and feet much better than running on a hard surface. Shoes have a big impact on structure and how the foot works, my guess is the foot is where the problem starts and works its way up the chain. If you run the same track all the time pay attention to road camber, if you're always on the right side of the road the outer right knee will be stressed outward chronically.
My recommendation is to ditch the problem shoes (which ironically may have only shone a spotlight on on an already existing problem) and work slowly into minimal shoes. Also run on different tracks and surfaces which helps the body tremendously. I enjoy beach runs because the slope changes when I turn around to come back, balancing knee stress..
 

Gregor Samsa

Double-Digit Post Count
Foam rolling the IT band for outside knee pain is pretty standard advice among runners. It seems to work for a lot of people.

If you live near a running store, you can get answers to your shoe questions. Such stores usually have people who can watch you run and find shoes that fit your gait.
 

Bro Mo

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
If you live near a running store, you can get answers to your shoe questions. Such stores usually have people who can watch you run and find shoes that fit your gait.
I had never had a problem in 20 years until a "pro" helped me so don't accept their recommendation as gospel.

I think the zero drop shoes are a great place to start. Some still have good cushion but the drop is important.

Edit: Altra Running Shoes
 
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Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
I had never had a problem in 20 years until a "pro" help me so don't accept as gospel.

I think the zero drop shoes are a great place to start. Some still have good cushion but the drop is important.
Agree completely Bro Mo, these 'pros' are just sales people trying to sell the latest gadget, I believe the huge increase in running related injuries started with the advent of 'running shoes'.

Feet need to 'work' just like any other exercised body part, when crutched here and supported there they become a tangled mess of imbalance IMHO, and that mess seems to creep upward creating unnecessary chaos in the beautiful and time tested design of our bodies.
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
@Pinkninja
It does sound like ITBS. But the only way to know for sure is to be diagnosed by a sports medicine doctor.

Fortunately ITBS responds really well to PT.

(And not all running shoes supplied by the big manufacturers are gadgets or snake oil, nor are 'minimalist' or zero drop shoes a cure-all. You need to find what works for you.)

Disclaimer:
4.5 decades of all-terrain / all-condition running...
 

Steve W.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
(And not all running shoes supplied by the big manufacturers are gadgets or snake oil, nor are 'minimalist' or zero drop shoes a cure-all. You need to find what works for you.)
I prefer zero drop minimal shoes in general, and the fact that @Pinkninja is having pain coincidental to a change in shoes is suggestive that the new shoes may be an issue.

But to me, 20 years of running without injury is good reason not to make a drastic change to a very different style of shoes. You know the old saying -- If it ain't broke, don't break it ;-).
 

offwidth

More than 5000 posts
@Pinkninja
As the others have said...barring any other changes to your routine, it really does seem most likely the change in your foot wear is the culprit.
If the shoes you were wearing prior were working, then why not go back to that model?
I get it that shoe models can get dropped or changed, and that can be frustrating.

Again... a qualified sports medicine professional, should be able to confirm ITBS and recommend the best course of treatment. (Trying to run through the injury will not likely be one of the recommendations)
 

Pinkninja

Triple-Digit Post Count
Thanks everyone for your very great advice. I will try rolling the quad area and down the side of my thigh tonight and also before going out for a run tomorrow morning. I do feel deep down that I need to make a change to my footwear. Those shoes are so comfy to run in though...just so light but I guess my knee might be telling me they arent for me. Also Bret S Im going to experiment with some hill running on Thursday and will see what happens. Im so very grateful to you all. Offwidth Im a little guilty of running through the injury tonight...desperately trying to convince myself that the knee felt slightly better after running on it while it was sore.
 

Steve Freides

Forum Administrator
Staff member
Senior Certified Instructor
@Pinkninja, you should talk to runners about shoes. I ran for a couple of decades. Things like changing model of shoe within the same brand are safer than changing brands. Runners have adages like "never wear new shoes to a race." That's even a new pair of your favorite style of shoe.

-S-
 

Pinkninja

Triple-Digit Post Count
@Bret S. I will let you know how I go..hopefully just a small learning journey is needed here.
@Steve Freides yeah I used to run in Nike Structure 18 and they lasted me for about 3 years until the soles wore down and the cushioning started to go wonky in the undersole. They were the best...no Nike Structure past then has compared...all too narrow now and the opening of the shoe sits too far back making toe front of the shoe long..I guess Im at that point like when your favourite hairdresser leaves and no one quite compares...anyway I will persever with the suggestions you all gave me. I didnt go for a run this morning as I will stick with kbs and wall balls today. Rolled out the thighs last night and this morning and will roll on tennis ball tonight again and try a run tomorrow...if still sore, will have to go to shoe shop. I got those Brooks because I thought they would be a good stability shoe but I dont know now. Maybe going with a minimalist shoe is the way to go...thats so unlike me though!!
 

Bret S.

Quadruple-Digit Post Count
Certified Instructor
@Pinkninja have you read 'Ready to Run', by Kelly Starrett?

The book is full of good info, may be something in there to help you..
 

Pinkninja

Triple-Digit Post Count
So this week I ran on Monday, kbs and wallballs Tuesday, nothing on Wednesday, kbs Thursday then a run today. As well as that, I spent more time rolling out my thighs and lower legs with tennis ball. Then rolled before going out running today. So, the news is that my knee pain stayed away for a good 20 minutes further into my run...I was so excited that the pain didnt come at the time it came on the last few runs. I thought I could tell you that my pain had all gone but Im happy that I got a lot further into it. Still seems I have a bit of investigating to do. Still need to take more care rolling and stretching....it seems I cant just cane my muscles without showing them a bit of love as well. Still think the shoes may be a cause too. Anyway I have to spend a few weeks with pre and post run prep to see what happens. Shoe change too.
 

njrick1

Double-Digit Post Count
I had a very similar experience a few months ago and it drove me crazy. I got new shoes, stopped running, completely changed my training, read everything I could find on the subject, went to PT but nothing really helped. One day I decided to intensely stretch my hamstrings and I felt better instantly. Everybody's different but I figured my experience was worth sharing.
 

Eyetic

Double-Digit Post Count
Hi there! Just a thought of mine, I started doing barefoot walking and running for almost 2 years now and It changes drastically the way you walk, run and feel about it. Consider giving a try.
I'm 6.5ft and always had problems on my knees and pain after run, mostly due to poor technique, since I started "barefooting" everything has improved way too much, when I walk I do it without shoes, runnning I use special zero drop barefeet shoes (vivobarefoot, merrell glove etc). You have to escalate and adapt to it very slowly but feels completely different and for me was a game changer on my knees, running this way doesn't permit you to stomp the floor as you would do with any shoes on, so you will start adjusting your body in order to prevent bad habits and pain.
 

Timmer C

Double-Digit Post Count
... One day I decided to intensely stretch my hamstrings and I felt better instantly.
Tight hamstrings can make everything from running to the deadlift troublesome. Back when I used to run marathons, training program coaches would often refer to stretching only in terms of "warm up" or "cool down". But the longer I do yoga, the more I appreciate that stretching deals with mobility and the ability to better make my body do what I want it to do.
 
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